The Classic Pamela Positive: “Belief Is A Wise Wager.”- Blaise Pascal

“Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you
if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation that He exists.”   

        – Blaise Pascal

Believing, about anything that is good, is the positive way forward in life.

 

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Believe in love.

 

Believe in nature and its calm healing power!

 

Believe in goodness.

 

Throw your weight into believing in anything good!

 

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Investing in Believing,

Pamela

 

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Mathematician Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France. He was the third of four children and only son to Etienne and Antoinette Pascal. Etienne had decided to educate Blaise—a child prodigy—at home so he could design an unorthodox curriculum and make sure that Blaise was able to express his own innate curiosity. In the 1640s he invented the Pascaline, an early calculator, and further validated Evangelista Torricelli’s theory concerning the cause of barometrical variations. In the 1650s, Pascal laid the foundation of probability theory with Pierre de Fermat and published the theological work “Les Provinciales”, a groundbreaking series of letters that defended his Jansenist faith.

 

Pascal is also widely known for his body of notes posthumously released as the Pensées. He died in Paris on August 19, 1662. He was 39 years old. Pascal’s inventions and discoveries have been instrumental to developments in the fields of geometry, physics and computer science, influencing 17th-century visionaries like Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Isaac Newton.

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Ben White on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rachel Pfuetzner on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Selfless Person Is More Concerned About the Happiness of Another…”

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“A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes. A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. ”

–H. Burke Peterson

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H. Burke Peterson was an authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the author of “A Glimpse of Glory”.  In World War II, he fought with the American Navy in the Pacific theatre.  After the war, he attended the University of Arizona and went on to receive his masters at the Utah State Agricultural College. He was married to Brookie Carden in 1947, and they had five daughters.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

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“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself;

he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”

–Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it. To being honest with ourselves… and to overcoming the challenge. We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.   With that honesty, as Goethe states, the criticism “will gradually yield to him.”

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766, he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

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     “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

– John Greenleaf Whittier

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John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

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“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”
–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

Terri has it right. What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important we keep doing so. At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so… however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth. So we must honor them, honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

As far as paddling one’s own canoe. As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.” She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together. We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there. She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special. She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

 

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Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I love That… In The Toughest Moments….He Never…Gets Distracted By The Chatter…He Just Keeps…Moving Forward” -Michelle Obama

 

“And I love that even in the toughest moments, when we’re all sweating it – when we’re worried that the bill won’t pass, and it seems like all is lost – Barack never lets himself get distracted by the chatter and the noise. Just like his grandmother, he just keeps getting up and moving forward… with patience and wisdom, and courage and grace.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      – Michelle Obama

 

You may face distraction.

 

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But your job is to remain calm and focused on the task at hand.

 

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That’s called character and grace, and we are called to it everyday.

Believing you can be your best,

Pamela

 

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Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States and wife of U.S. President Barack Obama, was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois. By the sixth grade, Michelle was taking classes in her school’s gifted program. She went on to attend Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the city’s first magnet high school for gifted children, where, among other activities, she served as the student government treasurer. She attended Princeton University, graduating cum laude in 1985, and went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1988.

After law school, Michelle worked as an associate in the Chicago branch of the firm Sidley Austin, in the area of marketing and intellectual property. It was there, in 1989, that she met her future husband, Barack Obama, a summer intern to whom she was assigned as an adviser. After two years of dating, Barack proposed, and the couple married on October 3, 1992. Their daughters, Malia and Sasha, were born in 1998 and 2001, respectively. On November 6, 2012, Barack Obama was reelected for a second term as U.S. president. After Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Michelle Obama accompanied her husband with their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, onto the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago, where President Obama delivered his victory speech. As first lady, she focused her attention on current social issues, such as poverty, healthy living and education.

 

Credits:
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Frank Mckenna on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive – I Love What Howard Zinn Writes: Hope Is Not Certainty… But Being Open to Possibilities…

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I love how Howard Zinn focuses on maintaining the human spirit. Throughout his life dedication to combatting injustice, striving to help those marginalized, and being involved in a brutal World War, Howard held his views of hope.

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