Finding Purpose, Finding Inspiration — An Interview with Inspired to Give

Finding Purpose, Finding Inspiration — An Interview with Inspired to Give
We hope you find inspiration in your life… when times are tough, it’s important to be creative. Find out in this interview how to think differently and make a difference. And check out InspiredtoGive.org!
We hope you enjoy!
Warmly,
Pamela and team
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You do not have to accept a drab and dreary day, a ho-hum outcome or a less than stellar experience. – Evan Melhenbacher

“You do not have to accept a drab and dreary day, a ho-hum outcome or a less than stellar experience” – Evan Melhenbacher
What a great quote from a strong thinker. He continues:
“You have all…. goodness to lean on and express to the fullest.  The so-called material world is not in control of how successfully you live this day.”  
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That really takes on new meaning. Do you feel like you are having a bad day?  Does your life seem 1/2 full, 1/4 full, or just that something missing?
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Well, you don’t have to accept it… a physical world is not dictating your day. Your heart, your devotion to good, your positive outlook, is gearing your next step. Believe the best and see the best, and you will soon experience the best.
Thinking of you,
Pamela

Love: Vulnerability Balanced with Courage

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 “I have learned about love. Love should be easy, free in connection; work, wonderfully so, as in investment; vulnerability balanced with courage, and always undergirded with trust. It should be grace, graced and grateful. It should uplift you.”

Love – we feel it, we know it, we believe in it. And I think it truly is indispensable.. we can’t live without it. As we peel away the layers of love… one I’d like to cover today is:

Vulnerability Balanced with Courage.

Love isn’t always easy for we must be open.  Are you willing to love even if you are hurt?

Because a relationship didn’t work the way you’d prefer… or a church committee member spoke harshly to you… your idea got shot down at work or a precious pet ascended to heaven…

I know… it hurts… of course it does…

So be gentle with yourself, first.

But dear leader – we have to have the courage to soften our hearts, stay receptive, and be open to love at all times.  And yes, that is at home and work.

This allows us to give the most to the world, and to ourselves.

Yes, at all times.

I know that might be hard to hear… Hang in there…

So there may be something that shut you down recently. Well, it’s time to unshutter the door and open back up. Take your heart out of the basement, or release your self-imposed sequestration in the attic. 🙂

Let’s be those loving, beautiful individuals, who deserve to receive and give love. And other people need it too!

Remember, to receive the benefit of love, we have to have courage.

“Love is Vulnerability Balanced with Courage.”

–Sunday, November 29th, 1998. 10:20pm.

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Pamela Hawley is the founder and CEO of UniversalGiving, an award-winning nonprofit helping people to donate and volunteer with top-performing, vetted organizations all over the world. Unique to UniversalGiving, 100% of all donations go directly to the cause.

Pamela is a winner of the Jefferson Award (the Nobel Prize in Community Service) and has been invited three times to the White House. Pamela was a finalist for Ernst and Young’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award and is an Expert Blogger for Fast Company and CSRWire. She is a philanthropy expert for the new TV show, Billions Rising.

Pamela is also an accomplished actress, improviser, dancer, and singer with over 100 performances in San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. She is trained by The Groundlings, a graduate of Upright Citizens Brigade, at advanced level Second City Los Angeles, and a BATS improv player. Pamela donates a portion of every show’s proceeds to UniversalGiving.

How Artificial Intelligence – and People – Can Change Your Life

Meet someone at an event?
Don’t take it too lightly.
It can change your life. It changed mine!
I was privileged to meet Marc and Jenni, two Dukies, at a Duke event which was celebrating people going back to school.  We struck up a conversation as I was leaving.  We stayed in touch, and they moved my life!
Read below:
“Here seemed to be two roads in front of us, but in fact, there was only one road that stays true to our life calling. We do not have a choice. We embrace it with all our hearts and souls. ….through Universal Giving, we are humbly called to make a difference in others’ lives.”
 
As you know, I am a lifelong believer of not only finding — but also fighting to find your calling. It’s not always so easy!
Marc and Jenni are doing it.  They are using their love of Artificial Intelligence to help bring comfort, solace and healing. Rather than use it for  straight commercial purposes, they want to devote their lives to using Artificial Intelligence for good. For healing. For help. For comfort when there is no one to turn to — or even if there is.
Read on for our series on “Compassionate AI”: Learn how Artificial Intelligence — and People — Can Change Your Life.
It did mine, and I am happy to share their story on Living and Giving.
Love, Pamela

 

Good Changes, and Changes that Pretend: “Jacob Zuma Wants to Protect Indigenous Leaders”? 

Dear Living and Giving Readers, it so important we distinguish between good changes, and changes that pretend.  Please read this below — how indigenous leaders are being “protected” In Bantustan– but actually forced there to be quiet and to stem the tide of their voices.
Indigenous people have long been trampled upon, forced out, removed, or killed from their homeland. Here, Bantustans are supposed to be areas of land run by the tribal leader.  Since they have leadership in place that is one of their own, they don’t need a voice. They have a leader who is of their tribe. So they don’t need the vote, they don’t need the right to speak, to voice change, to speak up for better lives.
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Interestingly these new laws are available — but only in English. How many of the indigenous tribal people speak English…..
I share this with you so that all of us can raise the curtain.  When people announce something positive — such as strengthening local leaders — find the there there.  Find out what’s really going on.  Today I share this with you that every person, especially indigenous, must have their important voice.  Spread the word so we can support them to take a stand, and that leaders such as Zuma must be firmly led to change their ways. If enough of us speak, if the world speaks, he can change!   And how important this is, when indigenous people really are the founders of their country…
Keep believing and helping,
Pamela
Jacob Zuma wants to strengthen traditional leaders
Critics say this will let them abuse their people
IN A community hall at the edge of the Kalahari desert, hundreds of Khoisan (also known as Bushmen) have gathered for a hearing on a new bill that could decide who rules them. Several are dressed in animal skins, with quivers of arrows slung across their backs. But despite their obvious interest, they are struggling to learn the details of the Traditional and Khoisan Leadership Bill. Few have seen a copy. It is available only online, and in English.
Even expressing their views is a problem: the parliamentary committee that travelled to the remote Northern Cape province for public hearings late last year arranged no translators for Khoi or San languages, or even for Afrikaans, the local lingua franca. Constance Mogale, the national co-ordinator for the Alliance for Rural Democracy, an activist group, watched the public hearing in Upington and shook her head in dismay. “They’re already trampling on our right to information,” she said.
Critics say the bill re-entrenches the tribal boundaries and leadership structures created by the apartheid regime, which dumped many black people in “Bantustans”, semi-autonomous homelands created to maintain the fiction that blacks did not need the vote because they were governed by a tribal chief, even if they barely knew him. The 17m people now in these areas would have no choice but to live under a traditional authority, which would have powers over land use and could be appointed by the government.
There is no shortage of examples of chiefs putting their own interests before those of their people. South Africa’s anti-corruption ombudsman recently found that in one place, Bapo ba Mogale, in the platinum belt north-west of Johannesburg, at least 600m rand ($45m) has gone missing from mining revenues meant for the community. In Limpopo province, a traditional council has been criticised for letting communal land be used by a mining firm that had given payments to the council. The new bill would give even more power to traditional leaders to make deals on behalf of their people.
For the Khoisan, the earliest surviving inhabitants of South Africa, the bill presents a different set of issues. Pushed off their land by colonists and oppressed under apartheid, their post-1994 appeals for land rights and cultural protection have largely been ignored by the ruling African National Congress. Although the new bill purports to address Khoisan gripes, it ignores the thorny issue of land (one group of Khoisan, in a recently filed court case, claims ownership of the whole of South Africa). And though traditional leaders in the former Bantustans would gain power over land, Khoisan leaders (who currently have no official recognition) would gain jurisdiction only over people. Joseph van Wyk, an organiser with Indigenous First Nation Advocacy South Africa, a non-profit, told the public hearing in Upington that his group objects to the bill because it fails to recognise the Khoisan as the first people of South Africa. But for Jacob Zuma, the president (pictured), the bill is a handy way to empower the rural bigwigs whose electoral support he craves.
This article appeared in the Middle East and Africa section of the print edition under the headline “Hail to the chiefs”

“Home is a Great Gift on Earth – Especially For Farmers”

Home is the dearest spot on earth for many of us. Home is peace; home is comfort filled with memories, meals, and meaningful times.

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For many farmers who travel here from countries south of the border, their jobs are the most important elements of their lives. And sadly, they left family members back home in Mexico, El Salvador, or Guatemala.
But they have to come. The wages they can make here in a day is the same as what they make in a week in Mexico. They can send the money back home and support their children. So when the farming season is over, they can go back and be with their families.
But everyone needs a home here, now. That’s why some owners of the farms put together a self-funded collaborative to provide beds for the farmers. The farmers have to get up early in the morning, such as 3 or 4, and are then provided a home cooked meal available from 4 to 6. They then head out to their workday and then have their own special bed when they return home.
What’s so important about this? The farmers love it. They queue up every year to try to get one of the available beds. While there aren’t enough, it’s a step in the right direction.
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I laud these farm owners who are coming together to help provide a home, meals and respite for their workers. They are watching out for them, caring for them, just as we want to be watched out and cared for. They help them beyond simply offering a job.
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Home is the dearest spot on earth. May we provide a bed, a meal, a shoulder, and a listening ear to all who need it. Can you find someone you can do this for, today?

“You do things when the opportunities come along” Warren Buffett

“I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  – Warren Buffett

You’re an entrepreneur. A scientist. A playwright. A second-grade teacher with a curriculum you need to put together. An artist. A music organizer. A guitarist. A preacher. All of them need new ideas, new creativity, every day!

It’s exciting… and also a lot of pressure.

What’s happening when “you don’t have any ideas”?

Well, something very important is happening.

First, your brain cannot be on creative overdrive every moment. It needs time to recharge and build up “blank” space. It’s like saying you don’t need to sleep. Body, mind, heart and soul all need time for rest… and then you can keep giving your 100% and be charged to excel again!

Secondly, patience is key. Just as Warren Buffett says, “if he doesn’t have an idea he doesn’t do anything.”

That’s really key. He’s not forcing it. He’s staying patient. He’s believing that the new idea is going to come.

And here’s where the real lesson is. He doesn’t make a billion dollar mistake.

If you get worried, push something, force an answer– it’s usually not right. So Buffett has done a brilliant but simple thing. He hasn’t made a lot of mistakes because he is not pushing it. He’s trusting the creative process. And therefore, waiting, patiently, for that wisdom. Therefore he makes billions of dollars, rather than lose billions of dollars.

Let’s review Buffett’s wisdom again. How does this affect your life? When have you made a rushed mistake? When you have had patience and waited for that peaceful answer? Please comment below!

“You do things when the opportunities come along. I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  – Warren Buffettstones-944145_1280.jpg


Warren Buffett

Born in Nebraska in 1930, Warren Buffett demonstrated keen business abilities at a young age. Nebraska was hit hard by the effects of the Great Depression. Like many children of the Depression, Buffett grew up to respect the value of money.
In grade school and high school Buffett not only showed his precocious proclivity for business by delivering newspapers, but also sold stamps, Coca-Cola beverages, golf balls and magazines door-to-door. By the time he was 15, Warren had amassed $2,000 and used it to buy a 40-acre farm in Nebraska. He hired a farm laborer to work on the land, then used the profits to help pay his way through University.
He formed Buffett Partnership Ltd. in 1956, and by 1965 he had assumed control of Berkshire Hathaway. Overseeing the growth of a conglomerate with holdings in the media, insurance, energy and food and beverage industries, Buffett became one of the world’s richest men and a celebrated philanthropist. In June of 2006, Buffett announced his intention to give away most of his fortune to charity.
Buffett believes in family and has 4 children, and lives in the same hometown of Nebraska.