How Do You Lead? With Values, Vision, or Voice?

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Actually, with all three. 

 

As blogger and author roshnyjr states in her piece entitled “Leadership and Ethics,” Values and Vision give the leader an organizational compass. But you can’t just know where you want to go; you have to have the right heart. That’s where Virtue comes in, and doing the right thing. Here, you have to be aware of relationships and how to conduct them appropriately. Finally, you can have all the Vision and Virtue in the world, but if you don’t Voice them, they are silent. You go nowhere!

 

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Let’s look at a great, long-term example of how this works. A favorite leader of mine is  Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. His father was a blue collar worker and had little or no health benefits for himself or his family. It was a constant struggle.

 

Taking that personal experience, Schultz created a value-based company by providing healthcare for all workers, even part-time employees. As roshnyjr states: “Here, the leader tried getting right things done so as to get a good result which influenced the workers to perform their duty in the right way.” As long as it’s authentic, that’s the right thing to do.

 

Schultz’s vision was local and global: they expanded into China and all over the world. At the same time, they created a strong, local presence by providing fresh coffee, personalized service and a store where people know your order. More than 15 years ago, their strategy was to create a “third space” outside of home and work; a second home to come to. They’ve done it.

 

Finally, Schultz is the voice and model of the company. He is a tireless worker and great spokesperson, driving the company through many challenges and enduring.

 

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Lead with Vision, Voice and Virtue – and you’ll be leading to success.  Want to read a more analytical piece on the diagram above? Check out the article that inspired this piece here!

The Human Touch by Spencer Michael Free ~ Don’t Get So Busy On Your Phone You Forget to Truly Connect!

 

A photo by Jonathan Velasquez. unsplash.com/photos/4mta-DkJUAgThis simple poem reminds us that genuine friendship is about the closeness of hands, hearts, and souls. It also, incidentally, captures the profundity of “touch” between Helen Keller, who was blind, deaf and barely speaking, and her mentor Anne Mansfield Sullivan.

 

“Tis the human touch in this world that counts,

The touch of your hand and mine,

Which means far more to the fainting heart

Than shelter and bread and wine;

For shelter is gone when the night is o’er,

And bread lasts only a day,

But the touch of the hand and the sound of the voice

Sing on in the soul alway.”

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Please put your cellphone down right now, and touch or help someone who needs it.  That’s where the true connection in life is!

 

Spencer Michael Free was a poet who graduated from the College of Physicians and Suregons at John Hopkins University in 1880. Later, he went on to practice medicine and surgery. He taught natural philosophy, chemistry, Latin and algebra at Ohio Wesleyan University. In addition, Free had a passion for the arts and letters which led to his writing hundreds of medical papers as well as poems.He tried several times to enlist in the army and wished to protect our country abroad. However, he never did, so instead he wrote and aimed to give his readers a sense of hope.

The Human Touch was written shortly after World War I and the poem urges a sense of love and humanity. Free also published Shawnee Cabin and Other Poems. While he was not healing people of their physical ailments, he worked for various charitable organizations throughout his life.

A Time to Talk [NOT ON YOUR CELLPHONE] by Robert Frost

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Living and Giving Team, I am asking you to talk today, and not about work. Talk to someone for joy. Talk to them for fun. Talk to them to give support.  And, do it live. There is nothing like slowing down, being present, and listening to another’s heart. Remember, it will change your life, too.

Lovingly, Pamela

 

“When a friend calls to me from the road

And slows his horse to a meaning walk,

I don’t stand still and look around

On the hills I haven’t hoed,

And shout from where I am, What is it?

No, not as there is a time to talk.

I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground

Blade-end up and five feet tall,

And plod: I go up to the stone wall

For a friendly visit.”

 

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A native San Franciscan, Robert Frost is a four-time Pulitzer Prize winner in poetry.  His work mainly focused on making sense of complicated social and philosophical themes of rural life. He had six children with his wife, Elinor. Sadly, 4 of those children died at a young age. Consequently, Frost had a very difficult personal life, and he wrote powerful literature. Soon after moving to England with his family, Frost published his first book of poems which did very well. When he returned to the states, he was well received by the literary world. His works were so popular that he was soon published by those who had rejected him before his move to England, including The Atlantic. 

Frost was best known for his ability to depict rural life and the countryside. His first book of poems, A Boy’s Will, was published in 1912. Shortly after, he published North of Boston. One of his most famous individual poems is “The Road Not Taken.

Frost then became a professor at several colleges. At Amherst College, they named their main library after Frost. Throughout his life he received more than 40 honorary degrees.  He was asked to write and recite a poem for the John F. Kennedy’s inauguration, a huge honor.  His legacy still lives on today as he is one of the most famous poets.

Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

A photo by Dogancan Ozturan. unsplash.com/photos/94taEmdowRw

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second? First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change. Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

Second then is body language and what we communicate; third come the words.

“I thought about what is the happy.” ~Jae-Young Kim, UniversalGiving Intern

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We are so fortunate at UniversalGiving to have a lovely team of interns every day. They are from all over the world.  What a team we have!

 

This is from Jae-Young Kim, a wonderful intern who had this to say in his writing sample:

 

“Hi Pamela, here is my part of free writing that you wanted.

 

I thought about what is the happy and how we are happy. Even though they said that you are a volunteer and that does it, I don’t think about that. Because she and me both give happy feelings to each other. After this happened,  I realized that helping people is such happy work.  That’s the happy.  That’s why I found the NGO companies and Universalgiving was the best company that I found. I really respected that your company gives donations directly and helps not only people but also animals.”

 

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Jae-Young Kim is from San Francisco, California. He attended Pukyong National University in South Korea. When he was on our team, he was an executive assistant intern.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt.”

David Ogilvy

“Don’t bunt.  Aim out of the ballpark.  Aim for the company of the immortals.” –David Ogilvy

This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus.  A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind.   Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

David Ogilvy (1911-1999) was a noted businessman, working in advertising.  He is often called “The Father of Advertising,” and was a key thinker in shaping modern advertising.