The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do All the Good You Can” —John Wesley

“Do all the good you can
By all the means you can
In all the ways you can
In all the places you can
At all the times you can
To all the people you can
As long as ever you can.”
—John Wesley

 

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John Wesley (1703-1791) was the founder of the Methodist movement, along with his brother Charles. Wesley went to Christ Church College, Oxford, and taught at Oxford’s Lincoln College.  He preached in Georgia, and throughout England, giving over 40,000 sermons in his lifetime.  One of Wesley’s best-known doctrines is that of “salvation by faith.”  He also emphasized striving for “Christian Perfection,” where the believer lived by the love of God.  He was engaged with social issues such as prison reform and the abolitionist movement.  Methodism is now considered a separate denomination of Christianity, although in Wesley’s lifetime it was within the Anglican church.  At the time of Wesley’s death, there were 135,000 Methodists; today, they number some 70 million.

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

You look great!

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.

 

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All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals.  StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books.  In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps.  All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples.  Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “There is a place for every star, and they all blend together.” —Alexandra Hawley

“There is a place for every star, and they all blend together.”
—Alexandra Hawley

 

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This is a lovely quote from my mom, which was simply a part of an email to me.  I love the analogy of stars, for they all shine, and all uniquely so;  each one has its enduring place.  The light of each star is their unique, special contribution to this world. 

Here is where the star power comes in. With each star’s combined light, we create a greater luminescence which brightens everyone’s experience, and therefore the world.

 

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Thank you, Mom, for seeing the star in everyone!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Water and Wisdom Come Through — Not From — Your Brain” —Dan Millman

“Like water, higher wisdom doesn’t come as much from your brain as through it.  All you have to do is to listen and trust.”
Dan Millman, The Laws of Spirit

 

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I love this sincere quote from inspirational author Dan Millman.  It’s about trusting what already is available to us all: a Divine Inspiration that guides every moment.

You don’t have to be intellectual, smart or have high education to receive it. No, true wisdom is from the heart, from principles of goodness. It’s about being led to do the right thing.

True wisdom comes naturally.  We don’t have to think through it, manufacture it.

Let’s embrace Wisdom today.   We can live purity of right motive and action, every moment.

 

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Dan Millman began his career in the athletic arena.  He competed in gymnastics and trampoline in high school and college, winning international acclaim.  He became gymnastics director at Stanford University in 1968, and in 1972 moved to Oberlin College. He began writing in the 1980s, on diverse topics including fitness and philosophy.  His writing and motivational speaking tends to focus on achieving one’s potential. In 2006, his book Way of the Peaceful Warrior was adapted into a film, Peaceful Warrior.  He is married to Joy Millman, and they have three daughters and two grandchildren.

The Classic Pamela Positive: The “Big H”: The Unfailing Recipe for Happiness

We search. We search for the “Big H,” happiness, all the time. 

 

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We try to find our right calling.  Our right partner in life. The right home, city, school.  And yet…

Happiness is about sharing. 

 

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It’s about experiences, time, thoughts and caring for others — which are all spiritual. And I can’t imagine many people expressing their happiest times not in the presence of someone else. It’s being with others, and being with them in a meaningful way. We also know that it is not necessarily even doing something; it could just be sharing one another’s presence, with each other…

So I love, then, Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s wisdom on the recipe for happiness:

“Serve others.
The unfailing recipe for happiness and success is to want the good of others. Happiness and success is when I see others happy.
Happiness is a shared thing.”

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Archbishop Desmond Tutu is a Christian cleric known for his work for human rights.  Active in South Africa, he was an important opponent of apartheid.  Other causes he has worked on include fighting AIDs, homophobia, tuberculosis, racism and poverty.  Nelson Mandela described him as “the voice of the voiceless.”  Tutu received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986, the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2005, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009.

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have a Positive Mindset, Think About Building Your Mind As You Would Your Dream Home

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create. 

 

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If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home!  So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didnt match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate! Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

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So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for.  If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential clients day with a positive smile or sincere compliment

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun.  That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.  

 

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Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out.  We can find the good even when we dont seem to have or own much.’  

 

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True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Is America’s Banyan Tree the Conference Room?

This is part two of a two-part series on the Bayan tree.

It is interesting how in America and in many places across the world, most of our meetings take place in walled, sterile conference rooms.  Chairs are uniformly around the table.  The walls are usually plastered with notices about the companys achievements.  Pens and pads are available so we can write and record and get our business done. “Gosh darn it,” I can hear the executives say, “in this room we’re going to get to the solution, get down to business, and ‘make it happen.’

 

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Yet what if we looked at doing all of our business, or even holding all of our meetings, under a banyan tree?  This return to nature might help conversations flow more easily.

 

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Perhaps this atmosphere would allow us to be more authentic. If we are surrounded by nature’s occasional stirring winds, visionary clouds floating across the sky, and brilliant beckoning sun, would we not also settle into a more authentic course of conversation? Could it lead to more natural, comfortable (and no less impactful, but rather more so) solutions?   Within this reframing context of nature, we can discuss our goals and hopes and plans and perhaps achieve even greater goals.

 

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Here’s a thought… We can replace the pen, paper and busy scribbling of notes, with more eye contact.  We supplant the flurried white board scrawls with more thoughtful listening. What a profound impact this has to have on any business relationship, business decision, and especially, with any personal matter. 

Until we can “Unconference Room” your meeting space, perhaps we can imagine all of our conversations thoughtfully taking place under a Banyan tree.  A place where comfort, understanding, and right relationships result under its strong, rooted and peaceful presence.

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The banyan tree originally received its name from the merchants who gathered beneath it to do business; in the Gujarati language, banyameans merchant/grocer.”  Western visitors to India observed the merchants meeting beneath the tree, and the name evolved to refer to the tree itself.  The banyan trees are given great symbolism in both Hinduism and Buddhism.  Banyan trees can grow to cover hundreds of feet, and live for over a thousand years.