Featured post

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Grass Is Greenest Where You Water It

 

“The grass is greenest where you water it. Successful couples have learned to resist the grass is greener myth – i.e. someone else will make me happy. They have learned to put their energy into making themselves and their marriage better.”

– Mitch Temple

Blogger

Let’s be focused on how green we can make our grass!

jonas-weckschmied-117633-unsplash.jpg

Truly wouldn’t that be lovely? If we all focused on what we have — the wonderful family or our friends who are like family; the job, or the opportunity to explore something new; the husband or the opportunity to date and find the right person – what a joy-filled world we would have! And a joyful world starts with each one of our own little worlds.

So this isn’t restricted to simply appreciating your marriage. This is about any relationship or circumstance in life. If you want to be happy, appreciate the parts that are good — and invest in them.

If you want to see something to grow, water it!   Let’s look at some practical ways to do so.

512px-Watering-can-green

Love him.  If it’s your husband, love him. Don’t focus on his faults. Well, his clothes might not match. But, he empties the dishwasher.  Let’s water that. 32px-Smiley.svg  Remember, there are millions of women… simply wanting to be married. You have a lifelong committed partner, and that is a very green blessing.

Appreciate your business partner’s strengths. If it’s your business partner, appreciate their vision even if they  miss the details. Or, appreciate their attention to detail, if they are missing part of the vision. Work with who they are, and find some quality of value. Let’s be grateful for the partners we have in life.

Love your roommate. If they don’t take out the garbage, value that they are nice companions to speak with when you get home at night, pay their rent on time, or like to water plants.

courtney-hedger-336844-unsplash.jpg

Appreciate your teenager. Maybe they aren’t so talkative right now. But they get B+ and As, are good people, and don’t get in trouble. We definitely want to put the sprinkler on that. 32px-Smiley.svg

Value your co-chair.  Maybe they’re brusque.  But they deliver value and care a lot.  Fertilize and nurture the value they are giving.  Don’t criticize what they don’t have; be grateful for the strengths they bring. Supplement them. If they are stunning roses with thorns, then plant your gentle daisies.  That’s why you are there!

Be Grateful for the Weather as it Keeps the World Going Round. It’s cold.  I know it’s Minnesota, or Hanover.  It can be brutal!  But it’s also beautiful.  Nature and greenery are gorgeous…droughts are not.  In colder climates, strong, tightknit communities are the norm.  Families bond together.  It’s green in the land, and in your heart.

So dear Leaders… Water It… Wherever You Are!


Mitch Temple serves as the director over marriage programs at Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He represents Focus at national events, seminars, media interviews and radio programs.  He has served for 23 years as a pulpit and counseling pastor, specializing in crisis, business and marriage- and family-related issues. He is a published author in various professional journals, and co-author of four marriage books such as The Marriage Turnaround.  His website Mitch Temple Online offers individuals, companies, and churches information on services, articles by Temple, and contributions by many members.  Mitch has been married to Rhonda for 30 years, have 3 grown children and one grand baby.

Bio sources: Focus on the Family and Mitch Temple Online; Quote source: Ten Secrets to a Successful Marriage

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Love Is

What Love Is.

It’s the warmth of your eyes.

It’s the feeling in your heart.

It’s the slowing down to care.

It’s connecting.

It’s giving.

And you can do it right now. Go reach out to someone and give them your love.

Love Today,

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is pamela-hawley-signature-1.png

Fig¹. Photo by Roman Kraf  Fig². Photo by Ryan Holloway on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

The Classic Pamela Positive: “To Be an Altruist, You Must First Be an Egoist.”

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.”

―George Gurdjieff

Russian Philosopher, Mystic, Spiritual Teacher,

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

photo-1476782916354-326ab24c93df.jpeg

From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others. We see everyone connected in spirit. We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves. So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.


George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man.

He was born to a Caucasus Greek father, and an Armenian mother in Alexandropol (now Gyumri). Early influences on him included his father, a carpenter and amateur ashik or bardic poet. The young Gurdjieff avidly read Russian-language scientific literature. Influenced by these writings, and having witnessed a number of phenomena that he could not explain, he formed the conviction that there is a hidden truth not to be found in science or in mainstream religion.

He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Paola Chaaya on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Josh Appel on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

Winners Imagine Their Dreams First. – Joe Montana, 49ers

“Winners, I am convinced, imagine their dreams first. They want it with all their heart and expect it to come true. There is, I believe, no other way to live.”

Joe Montana

American Professional Football Player,

Quarterback in the National Football League

If you are not excited about living, you are not living.

So find something you want, something you think you are really here for and go after it.

Joe Montana did this in football.  He worked and worked and worked and worked until he worked his way to the top and became one of the top quarterbacks in the world.

You may not be Joe Montana and I’m not either.  We can still have that commitment to find something we love to do and go after it.

Go Get Your Dreams!!

Pamela Hawley's Signature with an Orange Heart

Joe Montana

Joe Montana, in full Joseph Clifford Montana, bynames Joe Cool and the Comeback Kid, (born June 11, 1956, New Eagle, Pennsylvania, U.S.), American gridiron football player who was one of the greatest quarterbacks in the history of the National Football League (NFL). Montana led the San Francisco 49ers to four Super Bowl victories (1982, 1985, 1989, 1990) and was named the Super Bowl’s Most Valuable Player (MVP) three times. He also ranks among football’s all-time leaders in passing yards (40,551) and touchdown passes (273). Montana was known for his ability to calmly bring his team to victory from the brink of defeat during the final moments of the game, earning himself the nickname “Joe Cool.”

Montana was raised in Monongahela, Pennsylvania, and excelled at baseball, basketball, and football in high school. He was offered a basketball scholarship to North Carolina State University in Raleigh, North Carolina, but instead went to the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, to play collegiate football. Montana began his junior year as the Fighting Irish’s third-string quarterback but was elevated to starter after coming off the bench to lead Notre Dame to a comeback victory in the third game of the 1977 season. He finished that season by guiding once-beaten Notre Dame to the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A national championship. After a successful senior year that ended with a Notre Dame victory in the Cotton Bowl, Montana was selected by the 49ers in the third round of the 1979 NFL draft.

Montana became the 49ers’ starting quarterback midway through his second season in San Francisco. His field vision and keen decision making were ideal for head coach Bill Walsh’s “West Coast offense,” which relied on a series of short, accurate passes to move the ball downfield. Montana led the 49ers to their first Super Bowl victory in January 1982, earning game MVP honours in the process. His team’s play-off run was highlighted by a game-winning touchdown pass from Montana to Dwight Clark with 51 seconds remaining in the National Football Conference championship game, a play later known as “The Catch.” The 49ers won a second Super Bowl title (and Montana a second Super Bowl MVP award) in 1985, defeating the Miami Dolphins. The following spring the 49ers drafted wide receiver Jerry Rice, who teamed with Montana for six seasons to form one of the most prolific passing combinations in NFL history. In 1989 Montana led a dramatic late-game drive against the Cincinnati Bengals to win a third Super Bowl. Despite losing Walsh to retirement in the off-season, the 49ers repeated as champions the following year while posting the largest margin of victory in Super Bowl history (45 points), and Montana took home his third Super Bowl MVP trophy. In addition to his postseason accolades, Montana was named NFL MVP in 1989 and 1990.

An elbow injury forced Montana to miss all but one game over the course of the 1991 and 1992 seasons, and by the time he was ready to return to the field, future Hall of Famer Steve Young was entrenched as the 49ers starting quarterback. In 1993 Montana was traded to the Kansas City Chiefs. He earned a trip to the Pro Bowl in his first year in Kansas City (his eighth and final career selection) and led the Chiefs to play-off berths in his two seasons with the team. Montana retired in 1995, finishing his career with 31 fourth-quarter comeback victories and 10 play-off appearances in his 11 full seasons as a starting quarterback in the NFL. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

Source: www.britannica.com  Fig¹.  Photo by Rituparna Chaterjee from economictimes.indiatimes.com  Fig².  Photo by Erin Magner from Getty Images/m-imagephotography Fig³.  Photo from abc7news.com Fig4.  Photo by Remez Sasson from http://www.successconsciousness.com  

“Our stories may be singular, but our destination is shared.” – Barack Obama

“Our stories may be singular, but our destination is shared.”

    ― Barack Obama

44th President of the United States

Everyone is unique.

But we all have a common path.

Our destination is to Be Love.

So whether you want to be a health clinician, a data analyst, an expert in AI, a nursery school teacher, a stay-at-home mom, construction worker, or president of the EU, we are all on the same pathway: The world needs to be a more loving place.  

<span style=”font-size: 16pt;”>The world needs to be a more loving place </span>

My Destination Is Your Destination,

Pamela Hawley's Signature with an Orange Heart

Barack Obama

Barack Obama, in full Barack Hussein Obama II, (born August 4, 1961, Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.), 44th president of the United States (2009–17) and the first African American to hold the office. Before winning the presidency, Obama represented Illinois in the U.S. Senate (2005–08). He was the third African American to be elected to that body since the end of Reconstruction (1877). In 2009 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize “for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples.”

Obama’s father, Barack Obama, Sr., was a teenage goatherd in rural Kenya, won a scholarship to study in the United States, and eventually became a senior economist in the Kenyan government. Obama’s mother, S. Ann Dunham, grew up in Kansas, Texas, and Washington state before her family settled in Honolulu. In 1960 she and Barack Sr. met in a Russian language class at the University of Hawaii and married less than a year later.When Obama was age two, Barack Sr. left to study at Harvard University; shortly thereafter, in 1964, Ann and Barack Sr. divorced. (Obama saw his father only one more time, during a brief visit when Obama was 10.) Later Ann remarried, this time to another foreign student, Lolo Soetoro from Indonesia, with whom she had a second child, Maya. Obama lived for several years in Jakarta with his half sister, mother, and stepfather. While there, Obama attended both a government-run school where he received some instruction in Islam and a Catholic private school where he took part in Christian schooling.

He returned to Hawaii in 1971 and lived in a modest apartment, sometimes with his grandparents and sometimes with his mother (she remained for a time in Indonesia, returned to Hawaii, and then went abroad again—partly to pursue work on a Ph.D.—before divorcing Soetoro in 1980). For a brief period his mother was aided by government food stamps, but the family mostly lived a middle-class existence. In 1979 Obama graduated from Punahou School, an elite college preparatory academy in Honolulu.  Obama attended Occidental College in suburban Los Angeles for two years and then transferred to Columbia University in New York City, where in 1983 he received a bachelor’s degree in political science. Influenced by professors who pushed him to take his studies more seriously, Obama experienced great intellectual growth during college and for a couple of years thereafter. He led a rather ascetic life and read works of literature and philosophy by William Shakespeare, Friedrich Nietzsche, Toni Morrison, and others. After serving for a couple of years as a writer and editor for Business International Corp., a research, publishing, and consulting firm in Manhattan, he took a position in 1985 as a community organizer on Chicago’s largely impoverished Far South Side. He returned to school three years later and graduated magna cum laude in 1991 from Harvard University’s law school, where he was the first African American to serve as president of the Harvard Law Review. While a summer associate in 1989 at the Chicago law firm of Sidley Austin, Obama had met Chicago native Michelle Robinson, a young lawyer at the firm. The two married in 1992.

After receiving his law degree, Obama moved to Chicago and became active in the Democratic Party. He organized Project Vote, a drive that registered tens of thousands of African Americans on voting rolls and that is credited with helping Democrat Bill Clinton win Illinois and capture the presidency in 1992. The effort also helped make Carol Moseley Braun, an Illinois state legislator, the first African American woman elected to the U.S. Senate. During this period, Obama wrote his first book and saw it published. The memoir, Dreams from My Father (1995), is the story of Obama’s search for his biracial identity by tracing the lives of his now-deceased father and his extended family in Kenya. Obama lectured on constitutional law at the University of Chicago and worked as an attorney on civil rights issues.

Source: www.britannica.com  Fig¹.  Photo from http://www.quora.com&nbsp; Fig².  Photo by Chris Fisher from traditionalstoicism.com   Fig³. from http://www.quora.com&nbsp; Fig⁴.  Photo from http://www.familycentre.org

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Today Is Filled With Opportunity To Do Good, And To Be Your Best Self. – Khalil Gibran

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

-Khalil Gibran

Lebanese-American Writer, Poet and Visual Artist

So how can we do that?

photo-1515911630632-0c8e17517110

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Rohan Iyer on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING