Featured post

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Grass Is Greenest Where You Water It

 

“The grass is greenest where you water it. Successful couples have learned to resist the grass is greener myth – i.e. someone else will make me happy. They have learned to put their energy into making themselves and their marriage better.”

– Mitch Temple

Blogger

Let’s be focused on how green we can make our grass!

jonas-weckschmied-117633-unsplash.jpg

Truly wouldn’t that be lovely? If we all focused on what we have — the wonderful family or our friends who are like family; the job, or the opportunity to explore something new; the husband or the opportunity to date and find the right person – what a joy-filled world we would have! And a joyful world starts with each one of our own little worlds.

So this isn’t restricted to simply appreciating your marriage. This is about any relationship or circumstance in life. If you want to be happy, appreciate the parts that are good — and invest in them.

If you want to see something to grow, water it!   Let’s look at some practical ways to do so.

512px-Watering-can-green

Love him.  If it’s your husband, love him. Don’t focus on his faults. Well, his clothes might not match. But, he empties the dishwasher.  Let’s water that. 32px-Smiley.svg  Remember, there are millions of women… simply wanting to be married. You have a lifelong committed partner, and that is a very green blessing.

Appreciate your business partner’s strengths. If it’s your business partner, appreciate their vision even if they  miss the details. Or, appreciate their attention to detail, if they are missing part of the vision. Work with who they are, and find some quality of value. Let’s be grateful for the partners we have in life.

Love your roommate. If they don’t take out the garbage, value that they are nice companions to speak with when you get home at night, pay their rent on time, or like to water plants.

courtney-hedger-336844-unsplash.jpg

Appreciate your teenager. Maybe they aren’t so talkative right now. But they get B+ and As, are good people, and don’t get in trouble. We definitely want to put the sprinkler on that. 32px-Smiley.svg

Value your co-chair.  Maybe they’re brusque.  But they deliver value and care a lot.  Fertilize and nurture the value they are giving.  Don’t criticize what they don’t have; be grateful for the strengths they bring. Supplement them. If they are stunning roses with thorns, then plant your gentle daisies.  That’s why you are there!

Be Grateful for the Weather as it Keeps the World Going Round. It’s cold.  I know it’s Minnesota, or Hanover.  It can be brutal!  But it’s also beautiful.  Nature and greenery are gorgeous…droughts are not.  In colder climates, strong, tightknit communities are the norm.  Families bond together.  It’s green in the land, and in your heart.

So dear Leaders… Water It… Wherever You Are!


Mitch Temple serves as the director over marriage programs at Focus on the Family in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He represents Focus at national events, seminars, media interviews and radio programs.  He has served for 23 years as a pulpit and counseling pastor, specializing in crisis, business and marriage- and family-related issues. He is a published author in various professional journals, and co-author of four marriage books such as The Marriage Turnaround.  His website Mitch Temple Online offers individuals, companies, and churches information on services, articles by Temple, and contributions by many members.  Mitch has been married to Rhonda for 30 years, have 3 grown children and one grand baby.

Bio sources: Focus on the Family and Mitch Temple Online; Quote source: Ten Secrets to a Successful Marriage

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Find the People Who Can Make You a Better Person.” – Ted Danson

“My philosophy is, don’t hang on to whatever degree of success or celebrity you have,” he explains. “Find the smartest people you can and work with them, even if it means taking a smaller role. Get lost in something that inspires you. Find the people who can make you a better person. That’s how you stay fresh.”

                                                                – Ted Danson

“Sam Malone” from Cheers, CSI, and The Good Place

How true is this. You always want to find great people with whom to work! Then you excel, soar, float and can contribute to the world even more strongly.

Did you know that people who love what they do are 50% more likely to report being rated as meeting or exceeding expectations at work?¹ And it follows that people who work around likeminded people with similar values are more likely to stay. You have work you love, and people that you love. A great (and sometimes rare) combination!

priscilla-du-preez-623040-unsplash

Looking for it? Match up with a good-hearted, values-based team, doing something that you love. Then, identify organizations doing something you love. Or, you can donor vice versa! With both in mind, at some point, both will fall into place.

rawpixel-658254-unsplash

You’ll learn, grow, and ascend. You will make the world better. Plus it’s so much more fun!

Live With Great People Everyday,


Image result for Michael Tran  Ted Danson

Edward Bridge Danson III (born December 29, 1947) is an American actor and producer who played the lead character Sam Malone on the NBC sitcom Cheers. During his career, Danson has been nominated for 17 Primetime Emmy Awards, winning two; ten Golden Globe Awards nominations, winning three; one Screen Actors Guild Award; and one American Comedy Award and has been awarded a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Danson has also been a longtime activist in ocean conservation. In March 2011, he published his first book, Oceana: Our Endangered Oceans and What We Can Do to Save Them, written with journalist Michael D’Orso. Danson has been on a vegan diet multiple times, but he currently adheres to a pescetarian diet.

On October 7, 1995, Danson married actress Mary Steenburgen, whom he met on the set of the movie Pontiac Moon in 1993, and became the stepfather to Steenburgen’s children, Lilly and Charlie, from her previous marriage to actor Malcolm McDowell. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia ¹Hagel, John; Seely Brown, John; Ranjan, Alok; and Byler, Daniel, “Passion at Work”, Deloitte Insights, October 7, 2014, https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/topics/talent/worker-passion-employee-behavior.html ; Images: Fig¹.  Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash, Fig².  Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

The Classic Pamela Positive: In Order to Love, You Must First Learn

“The greatest of human emotions is love. The most valuable of human gifts is the ability to learn. Therefore learn to love.”

 – UJ Ramdas

Co-Creator of The Five Minute Journal

and Co-Founder of Intelligent Change

Oh! Dear Leaders today… may we embrace this lovely admonition. Our life is a beautiful life, at home at work, in the depths of despair, in the positive celebrations. We must continue to learn, and continue to love.

I will share this story with you. Early on in my work life, I was running my second company around age 31? 32? And my heart was all in it. It was my calling; it was UniversalGiving. And had worked very hard to get it off the ground.

We were building the team, and it was a young team. Like me… so some were only a few years younger than me, or my age! What to do.

Kindness was key for me. That’s what I grew up with in my home, and I didn’t know any differently. But now, there were points of difference. People wanted things done a certain way, weren’t gracious in their conversation, or they didn’t want to work as much, but we we’re still in startup mode and needed that extra effort in the beginning (in the long-run though, I highly believe in balance!) And I cowtowed.

Because kindness ruled my day, I let that lead everything.

I let them do most everything they wanted, to maintain harmony.

But there wasn’t.

And I got walked on. And tremendously hurt.

And they spoke down to me. And I let it happen.

There were no boundaries.

And they lost respect for me.

And they left.

And I really, really hurt.

I was staying with my values of kindness, yet, it was a permissiveness that was not actually loving. Love can be strong, and kind, and with boundaries. So I had to learn.

This is why I highly agree with UJ Ramdas. We must love– but we must learn. I learned to love in higher, different way– one based on kindness, firmness and adherance to my values. And with that, my respect for myself — and others’ respect for me — returned. And I could rebuild the team.

If you have a challenge today, seek out what you need to learn, and how you need to love. That’s how we can be our best leadership self. Don’t wait — we start today.  (:


UJ Ramdas brings together his passion for psychology and business to create a better world. Along with Alex Ikon, he co-created the “Five Minute Journal” with the goal to enable people to be happier in five minutes a day. With a background in behavioural science, marketing, and hypnosis he consults with hundreds of clients to bring them out of confusion into clarity. Currently based in Toronto, Canada, he is a huge fan of wilderness, eastern meditative practices, and a good cup of tea. You can visit his website by clicking here.

Bio Source: UJ Ramadas Website; Image: Fig1 Photo by Chewy on Unsplash, Fig2 Photo by Pixabay on Pexels, Fig3 Helena Lopes

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

lee-myungseong-716836-unsplash.jpg

Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

sai-de-silva-41029-unsplash.jpg

We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

ramdan-authentic-1088639-unsplash.jpg

Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

tyler-nix-550581-unsplash.jpg

I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.


Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash  Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash, Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash  Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In The Happy Moments, Praise God.”

“In the happy moments, praise God. In the difficult moments, seek God. In the quiet moments, trust God.  In every moment, thank God.”

 Anonymous

That means in all moments ― you’re going to the Big One. Whether that means the Universe, God, Nature, Principles, Love, Truth, Goodness. Go to your highest source to share, gain peace, celebrate, and develop you to be your best self. There is a presence there, to help you.

It’s time to be grateful, again and again ― that’s both with the challenges and the celebrations. Go to your source and share. He/She/It/They/All/Being is listening and helping you on your way…

I’m Sharing With Above,


Fig¹.  Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

American Basketball Player and Coach

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

Wooden had an incredible record.  He had ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period. He was also the first person inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame, as both a player and a coach. 

When I think about a masterpiece, it seems a gargantuan goal.  I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a decathalon.  

Instead, the goal is… it is being your own masterpiece.

That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world. So, similar to Coach Wooden’s team, you get on the court and shoot your best, defend your best, and have great sportsmanship at every point you can. 

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece.

Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature…  And step by step, create excellence. 

Get inducted into your own hall of fame. 

You Are a Masterpiece and I Believe I’ll See Great Things From You,


John Robert Wooden is considered the greatest NCAA basketball head coach of all time. But many people knew him simply as coach. On the court, Wooden led the UCLA Bruins men’s basketball program to an impressive number of wins, with a 664-162 record, and was named NCAA College Basketball Coach of the Year six times.

In his more than 40 years as a coach, and through his years as head coach at UCLA, Wooden built teams, an elite athletic program and a legacy that astounded the sports world. While his success on the court is heavily celebrated, Wooden’s teachings extend far beyond the realm of sports. A master teacher, he created the Pyramid of Success and wrote several books to share his philosophy with the world.

Wooden retired in 1975 but continued to be an influential figure in sports. He received several awards after retiring, including the Reagan Distinguished American Award in 1995 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2003.

Presenting the Presidential Medal of Freedom, George W. Bush said, “All his players will tell you, the most important man on their team was not on the court. He was the man who taught generations of basketball players the fundamentals of hard work and discipline, patience and teamwork. Coach Wooden remains a part of their lives as a teacher of the game, and as an example of what a good man should be.”

He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After a long illness, Nell died in 1985. John was by her bedside.John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter. Wooden died June 4, 2010, four months shy of his 100th birthday. He is survived by his two children and seven grandchildren.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and The Wooden Effect Website; Image: Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels , Fig2 Photo by Rich Clarkson/NCAA Photos on Getty Images , Fig3 Photo by Pavel Nekoranec at Unsplash, Fig4 Photo by Adrianne Geo at Unsplash, Fig5 Photo by Hassan Ouajbir at Pexel, Fig6 Photo by Rich Clarkson on Los Angeles Times, Fig 7 Photo by Jade Stephens on Unsplash, Bio Photo at Wikimedia

TWITTER | FACEBOOK | LINKEDIN | INSTAGRAM | IMDB | WEBSITE | UNIVERSALGIVING