The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at A Stranger, and The Important Reason Why” – Juliana Margulies

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

— Juliana Margulies

 

 

trung-thanh-598718-unsplash

 

 

I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 


 

 

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosopher and Madison Avenue advertising executive. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one young son together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Loyal To Those Who Are Not Present” — Steven Covey

            “One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be loyal to those who are not present. In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present. When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

Stephen Covey, Author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

 

How easy it is to make that small comment on the side: to slight the person, who slighted you. Maybe you were kinder, but you still wanted to do that little jab back. You’re probably embarrassed and can hardly admit it to yourself…

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.34 PM

 

 

No matter what someone has done to you, you have a job. That’s right, it’s a job, it’s a position, it’s a role, it’s a calling in life, it’s the gift of your life. You can take a stand for goodness.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.45 PM

 

 

You can take a stand for truth. You can break—the—chain.

As Steven Covey, one of our greatest leadership writers admonishes us, if you want to demonstrate true integrity, “be loyal to those not present.” That means you uphold the positive virtues and see the goodness in their lives. We start with that. It also means that if you do need to be open and honest, you can do so in a kind and loving way.  You do this in their presence (not others’ presence).

What does that mean if you speak negatively when they’re not present?

You’re doing it for your own ego, your own self-satisfaction, and building up your own sense of “justice.” Do you really think speaking  pejoratively about others is going to lift yourself up? In fact, it’s going to tear you down. If you try to pull others down, you pull down your own integrity: You pull yourself down with them.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-05-31 at 12.32.53 PM

 

Being loyal to those not present builds trust. In essence, what Steven Covey is saying is, be gracious. Uphold others’ character — and your own character — by speaking well of others and expecting their best.

That brings about the best for everyone! And about the best in your life, too!

Speak well,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle. He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University. When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

 

photo-1500917832468-298fa6292e2b.jpeg

 

 

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

 

photo-1491236149350-54bdab98dc14.jpeg

 

 

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

 

 


 

 

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12. In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about. In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Five Creative And Effective Peer-To-Peer Fundraising Ideas

 

I am so pleased to share UniversalGiving™ was featured in a Forbes Expert Panel article. This article focused on how to create more creative peer-to-peer fundraising techniques and you can read our response here. Scroll down to see our response on how to use social media to increase awareness.

 

 

250x250 c_3x

 

 


 

5. Leverage Instagram Sharing

“This is a great way to attain fundraising but also media awareness. Your friend posts an inspiring photo with a call to action on giving to their organization. You agree to viral it on all your platforms because through Instagram you can also post on Twitter and Facebook. Then you post your inspiring photo, call to action and cause. They do the same in sharing and they help you!”

 Pamela Hawley, UniversalGiving

 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Find The People Who Can Make You A Better Person.” – Ted Danson

 

             “My philosophy is, don’t hang on to whatever degree of success or celebrity you have,” he explains. “Find the smartest people you can and work with them, even if it means taking a smaller role. Get lost in something that inspires you. Find the people who can make you a better person. That’s how you stay fresh.”

– Ted Danson

 

 

How true is this. You always want to find great people with whom to work! Then you excel, soar, float and can contribute to the world even more strongly.

 

Did you know that people who love what they do are 50% more likely to report being rated as meeting or exceeding expectations at work?1 And it follows that people who work around likeminded people with similar values are more likely to stay.  You have work you love, and people that you love.  A great (and sometimes rare) combination!

 

 

 

priscilla-du-preez-623040-unsplash

 

 

Looking for it? Match up with a good-hearted, values-based team, doing something that you love. Then, identify organizations doing something you love.  Or, you can donor vice versa!  With both in mind, at some point, both will fall into place.

 

 

rawpixel-658254-unsplash

 

 

You’ll learn, grow, and ascend. You will make the world better.

Plus it’s so much more fun!

Live With Great People

Everyday,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Ted Danson, born Edward Bridge Danson, is an American actor who first became well known for his character Sam Malone on the hit sitcom, Cheers. He’s also starred on CBS’s CSI, HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm, and NBC’s The Good Place. Throughout his career, he’s won two Emmy’s, three Golden Globe Awards, and many more accolades. Outside of his acting career, Mr. Danson also is an environmentalist and released his book Oceana: Our Endangered Oceans and What We Can Do to Save Them in 2011. His father was an anthropology and director of a Native American museum, which led to Ted’s love of nature. Since then, he’s also helped found the American Oceans Campaign, which is now known as Oceana. He’s married to Mary Steenburger, and has two children.

 

Citations:
Hagel, John; Seely Brown, John; Ranjan, Alok; and Byler, Daniel, “Passion at Work”, Deloitte Insights, October 2014, https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/topics/talent/worker-passion-employee-behavior.html
Fig. 1: Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

 

Terri has it right. What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

 

 

heart

 

 

Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important we keep doing so. At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so… however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth. So we must honor them, honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

 

As far as paddling one’s own canoe. As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.” She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together. We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there. She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special. She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

 

 

david-boca-794671-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Life Is 10% What Happens To You And 90% How You React To It.”- Charles R. Swindoll

“Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.”

– Charles R. Swindol

 

 

inspiring 1 (1).jpg

 

 

So your roommate left. The head of your soccer team left. Your husband left. Your children left for college. Your dog left and wandered away from home.

 

Those are events……. You aren’t responsible for them.

 

But… you are responsible for how you respond. Not even react – but respond… with

 

grace, 

 

love, 

 

and poise.

 

 

marvin-meyer-672583-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

There is an answer.

 

And the answer is not “why?”

 

It is not about complaint.

 

And it’s not about smashing rackets.

 

There is a peaceful, calm solution to what Life throws at you.

 

 

nick-dunlap-747322-unsplash (1)

 

 

You’ll find it, and respond with a positive solution.

 

That’s the only way,

 

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Charles Rozell Swindoll was born on October 18, 1934, in El Campo in Wharton County, Texas. After graduating from high school, Swindoll then fulfilled his military service obligation with the United States Marine Corps, first in San Francisco, then on the Japanese island of Okinawa. After his honorable discharge in 1959, he attended Dallas Theological Seminary, where he graduated with three major honors and magna cum laude four years later. Swindoll was ordained into the ministry in 1963 and served in Dallas, he has since held senior pastorates. He has since received four honorary doctorate degrees from varying universities in honor of his dedication and contribution to ministry work. In July 1994, Swindoll became the president of the Dallas Theological Seminary and now serves as its chancellor. He is the author of more than 70 books, most of which are based on his research and preparation for sermons preached each Sunday.

 

On June 18, 1955, Swindoll married Cynthia Ann Parker, who used to be the pianist at a Baptist Church in Galena Park, Texas. Together, the couple has four children, ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In 1998 Swindoll founded Stonebriar Community Church in Frisco. The church first held services at Collin County Community College (now Collin College), then moved to its permanent home on Legendary Drive. The congregation grew rapidly from a few hundred members to several thousand in the first few years and this growth has necessitated major expansion of the current facility. He’s been honored in numerous ways including Clergyman of the Year in 1988 and second most influential Christian preacher in 2009.  Many of the pastors at Stonebriar are graduates of Dallas Theological Seminary, and the church is known for its missionary work in India and in other countries.

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Simon Davis/DFID
Fig. 2: Photo by Marvin Meyer on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Nick Dunlap on Unsplash