Top 4 Things To Not Use Your Intern For

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Some of us have been working in the workforce for 20, 30, 40 years plus.  We’ve done a lot of things over our career, step by step, building ourselves and organizations to new levels.  

In your mind, you’ve  worked very hard to advance yourself and your company.  You’ve also rolled up your sleeves thousands of times to help make sure the team can succeed, whether that’s raising a new round of funds, or xeroxing.   Meeting with a millionaire investor, or cleaning the dishes after a team event.   You feel you have paid your dues.

Yet being a part of a company and culture isn’t genuinely driven by that mindset.  Your devotion to work should be because you want to, and would like to help. That sincerity will advance you light years.   Not only will your managers recognize your genuine attitude, but you will feel a sense of integrity within, which is driving you for the right reasons to serve.  

But you might be tempted.  

“I worked so hard!  I need help.  It’s time for the young 18 year old to roll up their sleeves so I can do the important work.”

Part of that is true.  Your interns should want to serve and help in any way they can.   But it can never be your attitude in full.  People of any age deserve to have meaningful opportunities to grow. Provide them an enriching experience that will help them grow as individuals and professionals.

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So here are the top 4 things you shouldn’t ask your intern for:

  1. Go get coffee.  Everyone does this! There is no reason why you can’t get up from your office to go get your coffee and show the team that you are working to provide for yourself—your own caffeine fix!  Please keep in mind as well that as the newer generation is more socially conscious, they may not agree with caffeine or even the type of drink you are having, or even feel it is holistic or organic.  So, where you can you want to avoid any sense of conflict of values.
  2. Xerox.  We all need help with copying, faxing, and it’s okay to ask them to do it.  However, please be mindful that this should be no more than 5-10% of their job.  They are coming there to gain experience, not to press buttons.
  3. Personal errands.  Unless you have an agreement—which usually isn’t the case for college interns that they are doing personal errands for you—that should never be the case.  They are coming there to get work experience, not to pick up your dry cleaning.  Remember, they are an important part of the brand that you are building.  They can post online about anything that concerns them, but more important is that you want to make sure you’ve got a great relationship with them.
  4. Leave them manager-less.  If you are not present, make sure someone is.  They are looking for guidance, they want to grow, and they want to learn.  They don’t have anyone to go-to to ask normal questions about business.  They are going to feel stranded, and their work product will suffer, their experience will suffer, and your relationship with them will be not so strong.

We all need help and there’s nothing wrong with that.  Make sure that you give your interns positive ways to succeed in the workplace and build their resume.

Beautiful Thoughts, Part 2

Beautiful Thought #2: Do not ever view yourself in terms of age.  
 
Ever.
Don’t acknowledge it.
Further, do not buy into ‘that age of life’ whether teenage, young adult, senior.  You are you, with your own beautiful thoughts and experiences, not a generalization.  Likewise do not accept time periods such as midlife crisis or that you will have ‘aches and pains.’
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It’s a wrong classification of you.  Deny any suggestion of it.
It has nothing to do with you.    And it won’t do anything for you.   So don’t buy into it in your mind, or any conversation.  You do not need to act out as a teen, be tired as a mom, need more sleep as you get older, become frail in your 80s. If you have to be part of a conversation that discusses it, you can be silent.
Stay ageless; stay age unrelated.
Value yourself on your qualities, your joy, what you have to give.  Your mind, your intellect, your care of others or your job, or a hobby.  Value yourself on your commitment to excellence, or your kindness.
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You are not a number.  
 
You never were 
 
You are special.  

A Landless Country…

There are 60 million refugees and displaced people in the world. That would be the population of the 11th largest country.

But it is stateless, landless, lawless, unsupported.  “This country” doesn’t exist.desert-736096_960_720.jpg

We must have courage to help people one by one until this country of people has a true home.

Aikido Has No End

Aikido’s founder, Morihei Ueshiba, was born in 1883 in the fishing and farming village of Tanabe, Japan. He was the only surviving son of a prosperous father and cultured mother who considered him their gift from heaven. His premature birth hindered his physical development; even when he was fully grown, he was little more than 5 feet tall.
His father, Yoroku Ueshiba, became concerned about the boy’s small and weak physique and encouraged him to engage in sumo wrestling, swimming and running. As the youth progressed in the sports, he began to realize his physical potential.
Other than mathematics and physics, classroom studies held little interest for the young Morihei Ueshiba. Morihei Ueshiba was a restless spirit in his younger days, charging from one occupation to the next, performing his duties easily but finding no interest in them. At the age of 18, he was drawn to the martial arts, and until his death, the arts continued to delight and nourish him.  Morihei Ueshiba quit his first and second jobs because they were too confining. When he became politically involved in helping local fishermen fight an oppressive new law, his councilman father lost patience. He gave his son some money and told him to find a career that suited him.
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In 1936 Morihei Ueshiba renamed his art aiki budo, and in 1942 he emerged with a mature, modified art—now officially called aikido. The new name is a combination of separate ideas: ai means harmony, ki means spirit or energy, and do means discipline.
In his classes, Morihei Ueshiba discouraged his students from mimicking his movements and forms. Instead, he wanted them to practice a form so many times that it became part of their being. “Learn and forget,” he would say. “Make the technique a part of your body before you move on.”
Through aikido, Morihei Ueshiba developed extraordinary self-defense skills. He could take down and pin opponents of much greater size. He could throw a dozen men simultaneously. He ordered his students to ambush him from eight directions and easily manipulated them to his advantage while his feet stayed within a circle barely encompassing them.
 “Aikido has no end,” he said before he died. “There’s just the beginning and further growth.” The founder of aikido may have passed on, but his art continues to thrive around the world.

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Morihei Ueshiba was born December 14, 1883. Ueshiba was a martial artist and founder of the Japanese martial art of aikido; he is often referred to as “the founder” or “Great Teacher”. Aikido is a synthesis of Ueshiba’s martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Ueshiba’s goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.

Ueshiba developed aikido primarily during the late 1920s through the 1930s through the synthesis of the older martial arts that he had studied. From the end of the war until the 1960s, he worked to promote aikido throughout Japan and abroad. In his classes, Morihei Ueshiba discouraged his students from mimicking his movements and forms. Instead, he wanted them to practice a form so many times that it became part of their being. “Learn and forget,” he would say. “Make the technique a part of your body before you move on.” Ueshiba regularly practiced other spiritual and religious rites as well, and viewed his studies of aikido as part of this spiritual training. He died of cancer of the liver in 1969, he was 86. “Aikido has no end,” he said before he died. “There’s just the beginning and further growth.” The founder of aikido may have passed on, but his art continues to thrive around the world.

A Series on Beautiful Thoughts, Part 1

This thought is essential.
Beautiful Thought #1: Always remember that true beauty comes from inside.   
 
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It’s true.
When I was in LA I saw stunning women. They were perfect 10s!  It was crazy.  But most of them didn’t smile.  Some had high egos, or ‘too much entourage’ around them.  Others were insecure and didn’t like something about themselves.  Others were distrustful because they didn’t know what people thought of them or their personality–  only caring for their faces or their bodies.  Who liked them for who they were?  Who knew them, inside?
They were rating themselves on the wrong things, and drawing people into their lives who did the same. They were therefore miserable.
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Instead, value yourself in the true way. Rate yourself on your kindness, your joy, your love, your warmth.  Your ability to give, help and serve.  
From that, a beautiful peace will exude. Not just your heart, but from your presence.  People will want to be around you…   Because they think- they feel- you are beautiful.
 
And you are. 

Poolside with Pamela: Interview with Gary Austin

 

Pamela Hawley interviews Groundlings founder Gary Austin; one of the country’s premiere improvisational acting teachers.

First and foremost, thank you Gary. Thank you so very much for sharing your thoughts and insights with Poolside with Pamela. I hope you enjoyed the experience just as much as the entire UniversalGiving team has enjoyed this endeavor. Pamela was thrilled to have you as a guest and it touched us all very much to hear your history, transformation, and progress.

Your charisma and character have an effulgent tone giving the interview a natural and intimate setting (just as the Evangelists you mentioned!).

 

What Children in Syria Think About

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Here is a heartfelt letter from children in Syria. This is what they think about.
We are children from Syria; some of us came to Lebanon two years ago, and others came three or four years ago.
We suffer from many problems; one of them is being beaten by others. For example, in the school, we are beaten by Lebanese students. In the streets, we are beaten as well and some people make fun of us. A friend and his brother are sometimes beaten by the owner of the house where they live.
We also suffer from big economic problems. For instance, there is someone in the group whose brothers sell tissues in the street to bring money to help their parents. But sometimes Lebanese children steal the tissues from them or the money they gained from the selling. Some children cannot register at the school due to economic conditions and others because they lack legal papers. 
Despite all this, we still have dreams. Our dreams are like the dreams of all other children. We hope that no one will beat us on the road, in the neighborhood, at school, or at home. We hope that no one will speak to us in a bad way, and we would like to be treated by the Lebanese and the Syrians in a good way.
In Syria, we used to live in a house, and we live now in a tent. We wish to go back to our homes and our country, and that the war is over and that our parents can find a job to work just like any other parents. 
We also dream that the truth will come to light in order to go back to Syria and all the problems will be over. Coming back to Syria is like the re-entry to paradise. 
All of us have dreams for the future:
– I dream to become a football player and help people through sports (Ahmad)
– I dream to be a doctor in the future (Haitham)
– I dream to be a professor (Muhannad)
– I also dream to become a teacher (Fatima)
– I would love to become a police officer to help people (Wael)
– I would love to become president in order to help everyone (Madiha)
Finally, we want to thank you for all your efforts and your concern about us. Thanks you for coming here and helping us, and we wish if you can make all our dreams come true. We would like that this message could reach all decision-makers in the world in order to help us in achieving our dreams. 
-Noah, Mouhanned, Thanaa, Doha, Wael, Hiba, Fatima, Madiha, Ahmad, Saleh, Haitham, Ahmad