Tag Archives: pamela hawley

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What’s Important To You Is Important To Me”

 

“What’s important to you is important to me.”

 

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This is one of my favorite statements. It helps me understand and sincerely care about others. When we truly listen to our family, friends, partners, teammates, improv players, then we can really hear…what’s important.

Sometimes it might be a clean kitchen. For others, it might be taking the dog for a walk or getting the car cleaned. Or it might be that you showed up at your daughter’s gymnastics recital. And sometimes, sitting down and listening to your boyfriend, while not multitasking and cleaning the dishes at the same time, maybe the biggest sign of attention. It can even be as small as keeping your desk clean at work because you know it inspires your manager.

 

men's gray button-up shirt

 

The point is, we all fall into habits. These habits are what are most comfortable, and convenient, for us. They are our priorities. But they are not necessarily important to others. Instead, we need to take a look at what motivates others.

So even if we can live with a messy desk, if we know the manager is inspired to see an ordered workspace, then we can try to rise to that new standard. If it bothers our companion that we’re doing something else while he’s talking about a serious issue, then we need to stop and sit down, and give our undivided attention. If it makes a difference to our mom that we check the stove one more time before we leave the kitchen, then we make her feel cared for, and can do it again.

 

gray kettle on range stove

 

These are the small and important ways that we can let someone know they are important to us.

It’s the Substance of what builds or breaks down any relationship.

Many of us have felt that overwhelmingly warm feeling when someone does something for us… It specifically hits our hearts. “Ah…how grateful I am that they took out the recycling! I love an ordered home…” It’s something that puts you at peace. And that positive energy allows you to give more.

 

brown wooden panel with white heart

 

“What’s Important to You is Important to Me.”

What a beautiful way to live…

 


Fig¹. Aman Shrivastava on Unsplash  Fig². Brooke Cagle on Unsplash  Fig³. Michael Browning on Unsplash  Fig⁴. Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born To Succeed, Not To Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

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That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals, and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela

 


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

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Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be a small gratitude.

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

So stick with it, stay with it, and maintain your joy. I know it’s hard and I have felt it too.

We’re Committing, 

Pamela

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors to the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What’s Important To You Is Important To Me”

 

“What’s important to you is important to me.”

 

photo-1489942986787-cded4ecf962e

 

This is one of my favorite statements. It helps me understand and sincerely care about others. When we truly listen to our family, friends, partners, teammates, improv players, then we can really hear…what’s important.

Sometimes it might be a clean kitchen. For others, it might be taking the dog for a walk or getting the car cleaned. Or it might be that you showed up at your daughter’s gymnastics recital. And sometimes, sitting down and listening to your boyfriend, while not multitasking and cleaning the dishes at the same time, maybe the biggest sign of attention. It can even be as small as keeping your desk clean at work because you know it inspires your manager.

 

men's gray button-up shirt

 

The point is, we all fall into habits. These habits are what are most comfortable, and convenient, for us. They are our priorities. But they are not necessarily important to others. Instead, we need to take a look at what motivates others.

So even if we can live with a messy desk, if we know the manager is inspired to see an ordered workspace, then we can try to rise to that new standard. If it bothers our companion that we’re doing something else while he’s talking about a serious issue, then we need to stop and sit down, and give our undivided attention. If it makes a difference to our mom that we check the stove one more time before we leave the kitchen, then we make her feel cared for, and can do it again.

 

gray kettle on range stove

 

These are the small and important ways that we can let someone know they are important to us.

It’s the Substance of what builds or breaks down any relationship.

Many of us have felt that overwhelmingly warm feeling when someone does something for us… It specifically hits our hearts. “Ah…how grateful I am that they took out the recycling! I love an ordered home…” It’s something that puts you at peace. And that positive energy allows you to give more.

 

brown wooden panel with white heart

 

“What’s Important to You is Important to Me.”

What a beautiful way to live…

 


Fig¹. Aman Shrivastava on Unsplash  Fig². Brooke Cagle on Unsplash  Fig³. Michael Browning on Unsplash  Fig⁴. Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away From The Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

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Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

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For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights. You inspire!

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Bobby Burch on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Erik Dungan on Unsplash