Tag Archives: relationships

The Classic Pamela Positive: “When You’re At The Table, You’re Open And Your Defenses Are Down”

 

“People want that gathering together. The table is magical. When you’re at the table, you’re open and your defenses are down.”

―Lidia Bastianich
American Chef and TV Host

 

Mealtimes seem to be a time of the past. We eat in our cars and desks or even holding a power bar walking out the door…

 

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Yet, Lidia points out how we can find deep caring and nourishment at the table. It’s not just sharing food, but also sharing of our hearts and feelings.

It’s a time to be a sounding board and to have sounding boards…from people who truly care about you. It’s a time to relax, and yet also profound as some of the most important issues in your life may come out in a casual way.

 

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Don’t miss this time with your loved ones. “The table is magical.”  Or I might add  “The people at the table are magical.”

You’re Magical,

Pamela

 


Lidia Matticchio Bastianich (born on February 21, 1947, in Pula, Croatia–then a part of Italy), is an American chef, television host, author, and restaurateur. Specializing in Italian and Italian-American cuisine, Lidia has been a regular contributor to public television cooking show lineups since 1998. In 2011, she launched her fourth TV series Lidia’s Italy in America. She also owns several Italian restaurants in the U.S. in partnership with her daughter Tanya Bastianich Manuali and her son, Joe Bastianich, including Felidia (founded with her ex-husband, Felice), Del Posto, Esca, and Becco in Manhattan; Lidia’s Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Lidia’s Kansas City in Kansas City, Missouri.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by The Creative Exchange on Unsplash  FIg². Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Faith Is A Living, Daring Confidence

 

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times”

-Martin Luther

 

Faith is a living, daring confidence. Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God. And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

 

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He meant it for discussion, but he was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

 

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Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle. He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

 

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So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant. But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

 

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What do you need to take a stand for today?

With Gratitude For The Truth,

Pamela

 


Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.

Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.

The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university. Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.

In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.

Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture. In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church. Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.

Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Encyclopaedia Britannica.  Fig¹.  Photo by Zo on flickr  Fig².  Photo by Leon Macapagal on Pexels  Fig³. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels Fig⁴. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What’s Important To You Is Important To Me”

 

“What’s important to you is important to me.”

 

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This is one of my favorite statements. It helps me understand and sincerely care about others. When we truly listen to our family, friends, partners, teammates, improv players, then we can really hear…what’s important.

Sometimes it might be a clean kitchen. For others, it might be taking the dog for a walk or getting the car cleaned. Or it might be that you showed up at your daughter’s gymnastics recital. And sometimes, sitting down and listening to your boyfriend, while not multitasking and cleaning the dishes at the same time, maybe the biggest sign of attention. It can even be as small as keeping your desk clean at work because you know it inspires your manager.

 

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The point is, we all fall into habits. These habits are what are most comfortable, and convenient, for us. They are our priorities. But they are not necessarily important to others. Instead, we need to take a look at what motivates others.

So even if we can live with a messy desk, if we know the manager is inspired to see an ordered workspace, then we can try to rise to that new standard. If it bothers our companion that we’re doing something else while he’s talking about a serious issue, then we need to stop and sit down, and give our undivided attention. If it makes a difference to our mom that we check the stove one more time before we leave the kitchen, then we make her feel cared for, and can do it again.

 

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These are the small and important ways that we can let someone know they are important to us.

It’s the Substance of what builds or breaks down any relationship.

Many of us have felt that overwhelmingly warm feeling when someone does something for us… It specifically hits our hearts. “Ah…how grateful I am that they took out the recycling! I love an ordered home…” It’s something that puts you at peace. And that positive energy allows you to give more.

 

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“What’s Important to You is Important to Me.”

What a beautiful way to live…

 


Fig¹. Aman Shrivastava on Unsplash  Fig². Brooke Cagle on Unsplash  Fig³. Michael Browning on Unsplash  Fig⁴. Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Unite And Lead

 

He was brilliant, insightful. Here is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

“Divide and rule, a sound motto;

unite and lead, a better one.”

 

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It’s sad how, per Goethe’s quote above, that sometimes people are divided. We seem separated. It should never be the case.  

It should be that we are one. 

 

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In a close future, the habit will be one of uniting. It is for a better you, me, world.

We Are Uniting Now,
Pamela

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network  Fig¹. Photo by Adeolu Eletu on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make A Wish!

 

Make a Wish!

 

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It doesn’t matter if it’s your birthday. Make a wish, take a step towards your dreams. Then believe.

I’m Blowing a Good Wish for You Today,

Pamela

 


Fig¹. Photo by Saad Chaudry on Unsplash