Tag Archives: relationships

Why Certain People Are In Your Life

people come into your life post

These words have been inspiring to me, and I am glad to share them with you.

People come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime.  When you figure out which it is, you know exactly what to do.

When someone is in your life for a REASON, it is usually to meet a need you have expressed outwardly or inwardly.  They have come to assist you through a difficulty, to provide you with guidance and support, to aid you physically, emotionally or spiritually.  They may seem like a godsend, and they are.  They are there for the reason you need them to be.

Then, without any wrongdoing on your part or at an inconvenient time, this person will say or do something to bring the relationship to an end.  Sometimes they die.  Sometimes they walk away.  Sometimes they act up or out and force you to take a stand.  What we must realize is that our need has been met, our desire fulfilled; their work is done.  The prayer you sent up has been answered and it is now time to move on.

When people come into your life for a SEASON, it is because your turn has come to share, grow or learn.  They may bring you an experience of peace or make you laugh.  They may teach you something you have never done.  They usually give you an unbelievable amount of joy.  Believe it!  It is real!  But, only for a season.

LIFETIME relationships teach you lifetime lessons; those things you must build upon in order to have a solid emotional foundation.  Your job is to accept the lesson, love the person (any way); and put what you have learned to use in all other relationships and areas of your life.  It is said that love is blind, but friendship is clairvoyant.

Author Unknown

The Pamela Positive: “A Smile Is a Blessing.” – Mpho Tutu

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A smile is a blessing…It really doesn’t take that much to live into our blessing and make the world better for each person we encounter during our day.” 

This quote is from Mpho Tutu, the daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and an ordained minister herself.  She was quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, in an article discussing her and her father’s new book, Made for Goodness.  She also said that they hope the book will help people to “recognize in themselves their own innate goodness.”

How can we each be a blessing to another person today?

The Classic Pamela Positive: Philanthropy at the Drycleaners

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Get inspired by an audio version of this blog!

I’ve shared before about philanthropy as “the love of people,” as a daily practice.

One day I had a pivotal experience that helped me be a better ‘daily philanthropist.’  Each day, I make a ‘to do’ list. The list might range from contacting a corporate client, to running an errand at the drycleaners. Checking off these items certainly gave me a nice sense of satisfaction!

During this day, I found myself particularly busy. I rushed into the drycleaners. I swooped in to pick up my clothes and left a bundle of clothes on the counter.  “There!” I told myself triumphantly. “I fit in the drycleaners before a meeting. I have gotten one more item off my list!” Accomplishment, I thought; and yet I didn’t feel it.

What I realized is that the drycleaners wasn’t an errand.

No, it was not a ‘to-do.’

It was an opportunity to love.

Life is not about lists. We aren’t programmed to just get things done. Instead, each activity, each to-do, each task, is actually an experience of loving. This is especially true because each experience usually means interacting with someone else. And when we do this in a calm, present, joyful way, that’s living. And it’s also the true spirit of philanthropy. Loving and being present with others, with mankind.

As one great thinker wrote, a person “… is a marvel, a miracle in the universe… With selfless love, he inscribes on the heart of humanity and transcribes on the page of reality the living, palpable presence – the might and majesty! – of all goodness. He lives for all mankind.”*

Rushing in and out of the drycleaners, I had missed a valuable opportunity. What I needed to do was connect with my drycleaners, know them by name, greet them warmly, and sincerely ask how they are doing. Now I know how Hao is doing, and we have a great relationship of warmth and kindness.  I look forward to our visits.

Writing a check is only one type of philanthropy. I’ve found that it exists at the drycleaners, and pretty much anywhere we want.  Where does it exist for you?

 

*Mary Baker Eddy

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To be too large for worry… (Part 10 of 10)

white-bengal-tiger-407027_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your tenth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear, and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To give so much time… (Part 9 of 10)

balance-224644_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your ninth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have no time to criticize others.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To wear a cheerful… (Part 8 of 10)

boys-286151_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your eighth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To wear a cheerful countenance at all times and give every living creature you meet a smile.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To forget the mistakes… (Part 7 of 10)

top-mountain-100961_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your seventh one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

Promise yourself

To forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achievements of the future.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page