Tag Archives: model

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

 

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

 

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s.  She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Be A Family That Gives Back, Part One

 

 

Often we think about giving in a solitary way. It’s just us giving.

We are approached by nonprofits and we give. We see a cause, and we give.

 

 

aaron-burden-211846-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

But you can have a greater impact if you do one thing: include others. Most importantly, include your family.

 

 

gustavo-alves-669854-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

When you give solo, you are making an impact. But when you share it with others, as a lesson, an inspiration, and as a humble manifestation of good, you are helping the world. You are helping other members of your family see good taking place. Then, it can become a habit. Others will see that as a model of how one should live. They will naturally give.

 

Here’s some practical tips on how your family can give during the holidays or any time of year. Please share with us what you did!

 

1. Model Early

 

Certainly, a humble attitude regarding giving is always appreciated. When people speak about a long list of their giving, it can be about bravado.

 

With family, it’s different. Your 4-year old, 6-year-old, 18-year-old… whatever age they are… will understand it and absorb it. So begin gently sharing how you dropped off a meal for a single mom; donated clothes to the neighbor down the street; or quietly funded a scholarship. All of these actions make a difference. If your child sees this is the norm, he, she, they, or we will do it too.

 

 

tyler-nix-504391-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

2. Come Up With Your Family Values

Have a dialogue at the family table about what’s important to your family. Is it love? Truth? Doing the right thing, being selfless, slowing down, listening, helping others…? You can decide as a family and make sure that you have that up on an inspirational white board, bulletin board, or chalk board that you can point to. You can read before you sit down for your meals. Have a vision for the type of family you want to be, serving with the world and your local community.

Next, come up with your values. You don’t need more than three. They might be Grace, telling the truth, and loving kindness.  You can always change them but it’s important to start living and practicing them. You can then talk about it at the table. What did you do today to really live these values?

 

 

ty-williams-466945-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Is this philanthropy? You bet it is. The definition of philanthropy by Merriam-Webster is

“goodwill to fellow members of the human race” 

which also means loving people. Loving people is the purest form of philanthropy. It’s from the Latin philanthropia, which is defined by loving people:

Phil (Love) + Anthrōpos (human being).

 

Untitled design (3) (1).jpg

 

3. Make A Statement

Now, you’re ready to allow your young ones to make a statement. And they might not be young ones? Many of us live in larger families or blended families. Perhaps everyone gets an “allowance” to do good, not just teens.

 

 

sharon-mccutcheon-556371-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

4. Give Your Time

Perhaps one of the most precious things in our busy, Silicon Valley and global world is our time. How we spend it makes a statement. Are you volunteering? It’s great to take your time to do this with other family members.

You might see dad go to be a banker in the morning or go to work at Bapco construction on the street. But when you’re volunteering, you’re all working together, replanting the garden, or serving meals to homeless individuals. By giving back together, everyone is doing the same thing to create a greater good. And it’s been proven if your family volunteers together, “the children felt cheered up,” and they “respected their parents more.”2 Those are two great, family bonding reasons!

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

 

val-vesa-624638-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

So get out there and volunteer and be a stronger family.

I hope these have helped you understand how to live a more impactful life and how to truly give. It’s not just about

 

 

rawpixel-570908-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

It’s about the

 

 

jon-tyson-762642-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Let’s Be Living And Giving,

Pamela

 

 

 


Citations:
1Fabbri, Briana, “Allowance in America: When, Why & How Much We Pay Our Kids”, NetCredit, published on September 11, 2013,https://www.netcredit.com/blog/allowance-in-america/
2 Littlepage, Laura, “Family Volunteering: An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Families”, Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, 2003, https://archives.iupui.edu/bitstream/handle/2450/438/31_03-C05_Family_Volunteering.pdf?sequence=1
Fig. 1: Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Gustavo Alves on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Ty Williams on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Flyer created on Canva
Fig. 6: Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash
Fig. 7: Photo by Val Vesa on Unsplash
Fig. 8: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 9: Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Be A Family That Gives Back, Part One

 

 

Often we think about giving in a solitary way. It’s just us giving.

We are approached by nonprofits and we give. We see a cause, and we give.

 

 

aaron-burden-211846-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

But you can have a greater impact if you do one thing: include others. Most importantly, include your family.

 

 

gustavo-alves-669854-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

When you give solo, you are making an impact. But when you share it with others, as a lesson, an inspiration, and as a humble manifestation of good, you are helping the world. You are helping other members of your family see good taking place. Then, it can become a habit. Others will see that as a model of how one should live. They will naturally give.

 

Here’s some practical tips on how your family can give during the holidays or any time of year. Please share with us what you did!

 

1. Model Early

 

Certainly, a humble attitude regarding giving is always appreciated. When people speak about a long list of their giving, it can be about bravado.

 

With family, it’s different. Your 4-year old, 6-year-old, 18-year-old… whatever age they are… will understand it and absorb it. So begin gently sharing how you dropped off a meal for a single mom; donated clothes to the neighbor down the street; or quietly funded a scholarship. All of these actions make a difference. If your child sees this is the norm, he, she, they, or we will do it too.

 

 

tyler-nix-504391-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

2. Come Up With Your Family Values

Have a dialogue at the family table about what’s important to your family. Is it love? Truth? Doing the right thing, being selfless, slowing down, listening, helping others…? You can decide as a family and make sure that you have that up on an inspirational white board, bulletin board, or chalk board that you can point to. You can read before you sit down for your meals. Have a vision for the type of family you want to be, serving with the world and your local community.

Next, come up with your values. You don’t need more than three. They might be Grace, telling the truth, and loving kindness.  You can always change them but it’s important to start living and practicing them. You can then talk about it at the table. What did you do today to really live these values?

 

 

ty-williams-466945-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Is this philanthropy? You bet it is. The definition of philanthropy by Merriam-Webster is

“goodwill to fellow members of the human race” 

which also means loving people. Loving people is the purest form of philanthropy. It’s from the Latin philanthropia, which is defined by loving people:

Phil (Love) + Anthrōpos (human being).

 

Untitled design (3) (1).jpg

 

 

Thanks for staying with me on giving together and philanthropy. Stay tuned tomorrow to learn more about love and giving!

 


 

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Gustavo Alves on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Ty Williams on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Flyer created on Canva

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: We’re Going in Different Directions, No We’re Not

 

One morning as I was leaving for work, my mom and I had a very special interchange.  

 

We live in Menlo Park, and I was headed north to San Francisco.  My parents were headed south to Carmel for a bit of rest.  “Have a great day, Mom!  Thank you for having meand now were going in different directions!

 

 

javier-allegue-barros-761133-unsplash.jpg

 

 

No, were not,” she said immediately.

I knew exactly what she meant.  Our minds and hearts are going in the same direction.   Shes taught me to be loving and kind.   To follow my heart, and to do what I love to do.  And to live rightly.   And that is what she does with her life. She is so consistently, joyously serving others.  Ive never seen a better model of this.

 

 

carolyn-v-546929-unsplash.jpg

 

 

And so, as we parted that morning, we went in the same direction.

Football Defensive End Michael Strahan: His Advice!

Everything they learned for the most part comes from you—how they treat people, how they look at the world, how they process things. I love being that example for them.

—Michael Strahan

—✶—

Football players are tough.

Picture him on the field in aggressive play,

 

(source: The New York Times)

and still in uniform with that tough look on his face!  

(source: Yahoo Sports)

They are also smart.  

(source: The New York Times)

Toughness and smarts, along with an overweighted amount of being loving, make a good model. Michael Strahan has a call to leadership for all of us, on the “field” and off.  

You are an example to your kids: how you treat a stranger at the dry-cleaners, if you jay walk, how you drive your kids to school.  You are a model at work—how you treat other employees, what you wear, the joy and intellect you bring to each meeting (not the stress). 

What we often forget is that you are also a model for yourself: how you treat yourself, and who you surround yourself with.  This includes the state of your home: disheveled, or with flowers (sometimes it is disheveled AND with flowers, which can be okay sometimes, too!).

Being a model for our kids, for our world, and for ourselves, sends a message. Love the process of being a great leader for everyone, and you will change the world, this moment.

—✶—

Michael Strahan is a retired American football defensive end who spent his fifteen-year career with the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL).  During his tenure with the Giants, Strahan set a record for the most sacks in a single season in 2001 and won a Super Bowl in his final season in 2007. After retiring from the NFL, Strahan became a media personality. He is currently a football analyst on Fox NFL Sunday and also serves as co-host on the television morning talk show, Live! with Kelly and Michael, alongside Kelly Ripa. He starred in and produced the short-lived Fox sitcom Brothers and appeared as host for Pros vs. Joes alongside fellow Fox football analyst Jay Glazer. On February 1, 2014, he was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.