Tag Archives: classic pamela positive

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make My Life a Little Light” -M. Bentham-Edwards

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives. See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light, Within the world to glow; A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

―M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Look At The Sunny Side… Part Four of Ten

 

This is Part Four of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.  Please click these links to read parts One, Two, and Three.

 

 

Promise Yourself

To look at the sunny side of everything and make your optimism come true.

—Christian D. Larson

 

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

photo of crepuscular rays on mountains

 

 

Here’s your fourth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Stay tuned for Part Five of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by Nathan Dumlao on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I shut my eyes in order to see.” – Paul Gauguin

 

“I shut my eyes in order to see.” 

– Paul Gauguin

 

 

assorted-color paints and paintbrushes on white tarp

 

Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) was an artist who was renowned for his Post Impressionism painting in the 19th century. He was an innovator in the use of bold colors. At the same time, he also brought out the meaning of each subject. He balanced authenticity with innovation.

 

What we can learn from Paul Gauguin: Let’s ‘see’ differently. Don’t use your eyes.  Instead, use “meaning” to see.

 

 

Image result for Paul Gauguin

 

 

What’s meaningful to you? Be bold in recognizing it. You’ll see an amazing painting of goodness, kindness and abundance all around you, if you will just see.

 

 


Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading French Post-Impressionist artist who was not well appreciated until after his death. Gauguin was born in Paris to Clovis Gauguin and Aline Chazal on June 7, 1848.His father, a 34-year-old liberal journalist, came from a family of entrepreneurs residing in Orléans. He was compelled to flee France when the newspaper for which he wrote was suppressed by French authorities.

Gauguin was later recognized for his experimental use of colors and synthetist style that were distinguishably different from Impressionism. His work was influential to the French avant-garde and many modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse. Many of his paintings were in the possession of Russian collector Sergei Shchukin. He was an important figure in the Symbolist movement as a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramist, and writer. His bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art, while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

In 1873, he married a Danish woman, Mette-Sophie Gad (1850–1920). Over the next ten years, they had five children.

BioSource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹.Photo by Taelynn Christopher on Unsplash

Fig².Photo by Irina on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: “To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.” —George Gurdjieff

 

 

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.”

—George Gurdjieff

 

 

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

 

 

woman sitting on dock during daytime

 

 

From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others. We see everyone connected in spirit. We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves. So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.

 

 

woman standing near person in wheelchair near green grass field

 

 


George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man.

He was born to a Caucasus Greek father, and an Armenian mother in Alexandropol (now Gyumri). Early influences on him included his father, a carpenter and amateur ashik or bardic poet. The young Gurdjieff avidly read Russian-language scientific literature. Influenced by these writings, and having witnessed a number of phenomena that he could not explain, he formed the conviction that there is a hidden truth not to be found in science or in mainstream religion.

He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹.  Paola Chaaya on Unsplash

Fig².  Josh Appel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

 

 

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.

Did you ever see a really great man?

Great in the best and truest sense?

If so, you could walk right up to him and say:

“How are you, Jim?”

 

—Russell Conwell

 

 

selective focus photo of man waving in vehicle

 

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.

 

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹. JuniperPhoton on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have a Positive Mindset: Think about Building your Mind as you would your Dream Home

 

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create.  If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home!   So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!  Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

 

four orange, green, blue, and red paint rollers

 

 

So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for.  If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

 

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

 

man and woman hugging each other photography

 

 

Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out.  We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’    True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 

 


Citations:

Fig¹. David Pisnoy on Unsplash

Fig². Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

 

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

 

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s.  She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash