Tag Archives: classic pamela positive

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have A Positive Mindset: Think About Building Your Mind As You Would Your Dream Home

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create. If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home! So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!

Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

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So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for. If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

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Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out. We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’ True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: What’s in a Conversation…Who Will You “Turn Towards” Today?

 

The word to conversehas morphed to mean using words or talking.

But what it meant at inception was to “turn towards one another.”

 

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First, it was designed to delve more deeply into a truth of some sort. To learn more, explore, care. It was also to find commonalities amongst people.

Yet even more importantly, it means we turn to one another with our full attention. With care, with sincere interest, even a them-onlyfocus. To converse, then, is actually one of the greatest signs of respect we can provide someone.

 

Two Woman Doing Exercise

 

Who will you turn towardstoday?

Turning Towards You,

Pamela


Fig¹. Photo by Bewakoof.com Official on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Luis Quintero on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Let Someone In

 

I really love being truthful about my self-growth. Recently, I have been trying to work on my driving.

I don’t mean on not cutting people off or not being rude on the road. I meant that extra sense of courteousness and kindness.

In Silicon Valley, the traffic has increased by 80% in the last 8 years.¹ We’re all rushing around to get places. It used to take me 40 minutes from San Francisco to get to my parents’ home but now it can take upwards to 1 hour and 40 minutes. Well, my goal is to be contrarian. I want to be the person who “lets someone in”.

 

Golden Gate Bridge, New York

 

I have to admit, and I’m embarrassed, it’s been hard for me to let someone in.

Sometimes, I forget.

Sometimes, I’m in a rush.

 

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Sometimes, I don’t “feel like it”.

That’s probably the most embarrassing of all: You don’t feel like helping someone?

 

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Well, there are ways to change our thinking.

One of the things that’s helped me is to imagine someone I really respect being in that car. We only see tail lights or a bumper; we don’t see the person. What if your mom was in there? What if Jesus was in there? What if Buddha was in there? What if Mister Rogers was in there? What if Mother Teresa was in there?

Would that make a difference?

 

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I have to say it would.

So I’m just writing this to help encourage myself on an area I need to work on: Let People In.

 

 

Once I master this, my new goal will be to let two people in. And I will make it a habit. I believe this will build my character; I will believe it will help the world; and I believe… I will still be on time.

 

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When you do the right thing, the right thing always happens.

I’m Trying To Drive With Courtesy,

Pamela

 


Citation: ¹Baldassari, Erin, “Traffic on major Bay Area freeways has grown 80 percent since 2010”, Mercury News, published on September 18, 2017

Fig¹.Photo by Kushagra Kevat on Unsplash
Fig².Photo by Simon Zhu on Unsplash
Fig³.Photo by Noah Buscher on Unsplash
Fig⁴.Photo by Danis Lou on Unsplash
Fig⁵.Photo by Hannah Olinger on Unsplash
Fig⁶.Photo by Matthew Ronder-Seid on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “To Be an Altruist, You Must First Be an Egoist.” -George Gurdjieff

 

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.”

—George Gurdjieff

 

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

 

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From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others. We see everyone connected in spirit. We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves. So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.

 

woman standing near person in wheelchair near green grass field

 


George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man.

He was born to a Caucasus Greek father, and an Armenian mother in Alexandropol (now Gyumri). Early influences on him included his father, a carpenter and amateur ashik or bardic poet. The young Gurdjieff avidly read Russian-language scientific literature. Influenced by these writings, and having witnessed a number of phenomena that he could not explain, he formed the conviction that there is a hidden truth not to be found in science or in mainstream religion.

He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Paola Chaaya on Unsplash  Fig².  Josh Appel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

―Cindy Crawford

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

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So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others,

Pamela


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies. Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash  Citation: ¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

 

Girl Wearing Blue Denim Dress Shirt

 

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be small gratitude.

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

BioSource: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful to Others” – Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

 

“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

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If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is one of our most renowned writers, philosophers, and literary creators. He came from a wealthy family; he didn’t need to do a lot if he didn’t want to.  But he used his skills to create literature that made us think.  Additionally, top leaders of the day came to him to hear his thoughts, which were profound and inspirational. So not only did he create excellent works of literary art, but he also engaged world leaders with his deep thinking. They became better people, because of him. They sought him out for his thoughts.

We can learn from Goethe. The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D.

 

man wearing white top using MacBook

 

and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities.

But you might also simply smile peacefully

 

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and joyously to all that come your way.

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Wikimedia Commons Fig².  Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplush   Fig³. Photo by Warren Wong on Unsplash