“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D. and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities. But you might also simply smile peacefully and joyously to all that come your way.

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.  

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt.  Your life is needed now.  Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!  


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Bio of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.
On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

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The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To talk health… (Part 2 of 10)

fitness-332278_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your second one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

Promise yourself

To talk health, happiness, and prosperity to every person you meet.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To be so strong… (Part 1 of 10)

peaceful-442070_640Promise Yourself, by Christian D. Larson

“Promise Yourself” is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”   The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.    It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

Here’s your first one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

Promise yourself

To be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind.

 

Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page

 

Man Bakes Pies to Heal His Heart

What a lovely example.  I love people who despite any hurt– still rise above, and give.  It’s so beautiful.  What a courageous man.  He bakes pies to heal his heart, after his wife ascended.

——————-

It seems Keller couldn’t possibly have thought up a more beautiful way to honor his late wife than by baking hundreds of pies and selflessly giving them away to those in need. But one of the most touching parts of his tribute actually comes long before the final baked goods are revealed. It happens each time he opens the oven.

Read about 98-year-old Keller here.

As he explained to the station, his wife picked it out when they moved in their Hastings home 62 years ago.

“Everything I do, I do it with love,” he said. “That’s my secret ingredient, is love.”

Read full article

This article originally appeared in Foodandwine.com

 In Order to Love, You Must First Learn

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“The greatest of human emotions is love. The most valuable of human gifts is the ability to learn. Therefore learn to love.”  – UJ Ramdas
Oh! Dear Leaders today… may we embrace this lovely admonition. Our life is a beautiful life, at home at work, in the depths of despair, in the positive celebrations. We must continue to learn, and continue to love.
I will share this story with you. Early on in my work life, I was running my second company around age 31? 32? And my heart was all in it. It was my calling; it was UniversalGiving. And had worked very hard to get it off the ground.
We were building the team, and it was a young team. Like me… so some were only a few years younger than me, or my age! What to do.
Kindness was key for me. That’s what I grew up with in my home, and I didn’t know any differently. But now, there were points of difference. People wanted things done a certain way, weren’t gracious in their conversation, or they didn’t want to work as much, but we we’re still in startup mode and needed that extra effort in the beginning (in the long-run though, I highly believe in balance!) And I cowtowed.

Because kindness ruled my day, I let that lead everything.

 

I let them do most everything they wanted, to maintain harmony.

But there wasn’t.

And I got walked on. And tremendously hurt.

And they spoke down to me. And I let it happen.
There were no boundaries.
And they lost respect for me.

And they left.

And I really, really hurt.

I was staying with my values of kindness, yet, it was a permissiveness that was not actually loving. Love can be strong, and kind, and with boundaries. So I had to learn.

This is why I highly agree with UJ Ramdas. We must love– but we must learn. I learned to love in higher, different way– one based on kindness, firmness and adherance to my values. And with that, my respect for myself — and others’ respect for me — returned. And I could rebuild the team.

If you have a challenge today, seek out what you need to learn, and how you need to love. That’s how we can be our best leadership self. Don’t wait — we start today.  (:
***
UJ Ramdas brings together his passion for psychology and business to create a better world. Along with Alex Ikon, he co-created the “Five Minute Journal” with the goal to enable people to be happier in five minutes a day. With a background in behavioral science, marketing, and hypnosis he consults with hundreds of clients to bring them out of confusion into clarity. Currently based in Toronto, Canada, he is a huge fan of wilderness, eastern meditative practices, and a good cup of tea. You can visit his website by clicking here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Philanthropy at the Dry Cleaners

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Get inspired by an audio version of this blog!

I’ve shared before about philanthropy as “the love of people,” as a daily practice.

One day I had a pivotal experience that helped me be a better ‘daily philanthropist.’  Each day, I make a ‘to do’ list. The list might range from contacting a corporate client, to running an errand at the dry cleaners. Checking off these items certainly gave me a nice sense of satisfaction!

During this day, I found myself particularly busy. I rushed into the dry cleaners. I swooped in to pick up my clothes and left a bundle of clothes on the counter. “There!” I told myself triumphantly. “I fit in the dry cleaners before a meeting. I have gotten one more item off my list!” Accomplishment, I thought; and yet I didn’t feel it.

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What I realized is that the dry cleaners wasn’t an errand.

No, it was not a ‘to-do.’

It was an opportunity to love.

Life is not about lists. We aren’t programmed to just get things done. Instead, each activity, each to-do, each task, is actually an experience of loving. This is especially true because each experience usually means interacting with someone else. And when we do this in a calm, present, joyful way, that’s living. And it’s also the true spirit of philanthropy. Loving and being present with others, with mankind.

As one great thinker wrote, a person “… is a marvel, a miracle in the universe… With selfless love, he inscribes on the heart of humanity and transcribes on the page of reality the living, palpable presence – the might and majesty! – of all goodness. He lives for all mankind.”*

Rushing in and out of the dry cleaners, I had missed a valuable opportunity. What I needed to do was connect with my dry cleaners, know them by name, greet them warmly, and sincerely ask how they are doing. Now I know how Hao is doing, and we have a great relationship of warmth and kindness.  I look forward to our visits.

Writing a check is only one type of philanthropy. I’ve found that it exists at the dry cleaners, and pretty much anywhere we want.  Where does it exist for you?

*Mary Baker Eddy

The Top Thing Everyone Loves

smile

“Smiling is Free”

Love,

   Dove

It’s one of the greatest things.

Don’t forget to do this.

Everyone loves this.

And even if they are having a really really bad day – if you smile at them — they will smile back at you, simply by reflex.

Bring some peace to someone’s troubled heart today. I am leaving work now, and with a smile.  Good night!

– Pamela
***
Dove Chocolate, sold as Galaxy in other countries, is a Mars Company owned and operated brand of chocolate that is virtually in all supermarkets and convenience stores across the US. They are well known for their silky and smooth texture and are well liked. However, what makes each chocolate special is the addition of a quote inside each of their wrappers, which has attracted both praise and critique from many consumers. 
 
Dove Chocolate messages like “Believe in yourself,” and “Make the most of everyday,” and others dealing with hope, mindfulness, and inspiration, bring positivity to the life of the reader. However, some people feel that sayings like “Too much of a good thing is still wonderful,” and “Do what feels right,” are misleading and may be giving people bad advice, and have been poking fun at the wrapper messages. You can take a look at photos of their wrappers by clicking here and you can read a compilation of their messages here.