Tag Archives: inspiration

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

 

chocolates

 

 

Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate!  Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love.  We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

 

Be vulnerable, grow, love!

 

Pamela

 


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking.  His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind.  His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities.  In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell.  Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To give so much time… Part Nine of Ten

 

This is Part Nine of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.  Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Promise Yourself

—Christian D. Larson

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

silhouette photography of woman stretching front of sea

 

 

Here’s your ninth one, below.  I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have no time to criticize others.

 

Stay tuned for Part Ten of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books.  He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s.  He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz.  He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918.  They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924).  The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To wear a cheerful… Part Eight of Ten

 

This is Part Eight of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Promise Yourself

-Christian D. Larson

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

smiling boy

 

 

Here’s your eighth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To wear a cheerful countenance at all times and give every living creature you meet a smile.

 

Stay tuned for Part Nine of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by kazuend on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To forget the mistakes… Part Seven of Ten

 

This is Part Seven of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Promise Yourself

—Christian D. Larson

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

person standing in front of mountain landscape photography

 

 

Here’s your seventh one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Promise yourself

To forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achievements of the future.

 

Stay tuned for Part Eight of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by Nicolas Cool on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Am Here for a Purpose and That Purpose Is to Grow into a Mountain.” – Og Mandino

 

 

“I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply all my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.”

– Og Mandino

 

 

aerial view photography of mountains under cloudy sky

 

 


Og Mandino (1923-1996) is a well-known author.  His bestselling book, The Greatest Salesman in the World, sold more than 50 million copies.  His book was translated into 25 different languages. In addition, he served as the president of Success Unlimited Magazine, and was inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Hall Of Fame.

He was married to Bette Mandino for nearly forty years, and he described her as having “a lot more faith in me than I had in myself.”

Biosource: Wikipedia, ogmandino.com


Citation:

Fig¹. Simon Fitall on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

 

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

 

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s.  She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Fight, You Try Your Best, But If You Lose, You Don’t Have To Break Five Racquets.” – Rafael Nadal

 

 

“You fight, you try your best, but if you lose, you don’t have to break five racquets and smash up the locker room. You can do those things, but when you’re finished, nothing’s changed. You’ve still lost. If something positive came from that, I probably would do it. But I see only negativity.”

— Rafael Nadal

 

 

nadal 1 (1) (1).jpg

 

 

What an outstanding leadership statement. We all have times that something challenging happens. Do you tear around, pull your hair out, snap at someone?

 

What will you do? Spend your anger until you are tired. It’s all about you and you expressing anger.

 

 

roberto-salinas-621916-unsplash (1) (1)

 

 

Turn away to a calmer state, one that benefits all. Remember, you are a leader to others. Everyone is.

 

Everyone is a leader to someone, simply by our daily actions. So if that business partnership doesn’t come through, do you slam the door? Or do you sit down calm with your team, thank them for their efforts, and discuss lessons learned? If you didn’t win the election, do you set the stage on fire? Or do you rally the troupes and thank them for all their efforts and have a come-together-let’s-appreciate-all-our-work-together dinner?

 

Losing is an attitude. Not an action.

There actually is no loss. That’s in your mind.

So take the lessons learned, and have a winning mind.

 

 

rawpixel-706373-unsplash (1)

 

 

Even if you didn’t win, you still won knowledge. You learned how to do something better! Share that with yourself and the team. Celebrate that next victory for you know you are going out on court to do better the next time!

 

Smashing rackets wastes time. It deletes reflection. It’s no model for others up and coming in the world.

 

Hold your head high humbly proud about your effort. You did your best.   Then, listen, learn and keep going higher!

 

No smashing,

Pamela

 

 


Rafael Nadal was born in Mallorca, Spain, on June 3, 1986. When he was 3 years old, his uncle, Toni Nadal, a former professional tennis player, started working with him, seeing an aptitude for the sport in young Rafael. At the age of 8, Nadal won an under-12 regional tennis championship, giving Uncle Toni the incentive to step up his training. When Nadal was just 12 years old, he won the Spanish and European tennis titles in his age group. He turned professional at age 15. At the age of 19, in 2005, Nadal won the French Open the first time he competed in the tournament, and his world ranking shot to No. 3. With his powerful topspin-heavy shots, speed and mental toughness, Nadal reigned as one of the “Big Four” of men’s tennis (along with Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray) for the next several years. In 2010, he was triumphant at the French Open and Wimbledon, and his subsequent win at the U.S. Open made him just the second men’s player to achieve the career Golden Slam—victories at all four majors, as well as Olympic gold.

The 2016 season, after suffering a first-round loss at the Australian Open in January, he rebounded to win titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona. However, Nadal’s attempts to play through a nagging wrist injury took its toll, and he was forced to pull out of his favorite tournament, the French Open, after two rounds. Nadal took part in Thailand’s “A Million Trees for the King” project, planting a tree in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on a visit to Hua Hin during his Thailand Open 2010.

Outside of tennis, Nadal is close with his parents and younger sister, María Isabel. He has a deep love for football and supports Real Madrid. In 2007, he founded Fundación RafaNadal to support young adults and children. Since then, he’s also created a tennis academy for disadvantaged children called “Anantapur Sports Village”.


Citations:
Fig¹.  Retrieved from Carine06 on Flickr
Fig².  Photo by Robert Salinas on Unsplash
Fig³.  Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash