Tag Archives: inspiration

The Classic Pamela Positive: Read This If You Want to See a True Team at Work

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

I just had to share what a wonderful note I received from one of my core team members, Aurora. She works in Office of the CEO, and is dedicated, professional, and really strives to serve the world! Imagine my surprise as CEO when I received this:

 

Hi Pamela, Sam, Ayuko,

Today (April 20th, 2018) is my birthday—and in the spirit of living and giving, I wanted to “donate” today. I’ll still send my EOD (End of Day) Report, but I won’t mark today’s three hours in PayChex.

While I personally don’t have a lot of money to donate, I at least hope that donating my time in this way can demonstrate my appreciation for UniversalGiving.

Thank you so much for all that you do, making the world a better and kinder place.

Best,

Aurora

PS: I’ve been accepted to Princeton’s PhD program for Politics, focusing on International Relations. I requested a one-year deferral so that I can start a church with my friends first in 2018; and, Princeton approved of the deferral request! So, I’ll be getting my PhD starting Fall 2019! Thank you for all your support since September, encouraging me to grow as a professional and as a person.

 

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As CEO, you have a lot of news, positive and challenging, that you receive every day. Imagine when I received such positive news above. A team member so dedicated, caring and loving.  It fills your heart. You certainly don’t expect it and when it happens, you are floating with gratitude for days.

And so here was my response.  It’s so important to be grateful, but also to recognize and celebrate their lives holistically:

 

Dear Aurora!

What inspiring and exciting news… CONGRATULATIONS! I am calling you right now. Aurora, that is just wonderful news on all fronts.

First, on Princeton. What an achievement. We are so pleased you are advancing in such a wonderful way. What a gift for them and you to have this opportunity! You will learn so much on the international front… I can’t wait to hear!

Second, great you are accomplishing your goals on the church front. Aung and I pray and say affirmations in the office, and it’s lovely. He’s Buddhist and I’m Christian, and it’s a great way for us to share and give strength to our world and UniversalGiving. So good for you accomplishing this spiritual goal for yourself. Sharing positivity is so important, and you’ve chosen an important way!

Third, what a great gift! To donate your hard work for today… what an honor to have your thoughtfulness. You are a true, dear, kind ethical and utmost caring person. How honored we are to have you! That will sing in my heart for many years to come. I’m also CC-ing a few other core team members from UniversalGiving, because we love to celebrate our positive culture and any good news!

Thank you again, Aurora, for your great news, and sharing it with our UniversalGiving Family. We are rejoicing for you! Great job! Wonderful! Upwards you go, dear Aurora!

Warmly and with Great Gratitude,

Pamela

 

Sometimes, when we work at a nonprofit or do good in the world, we forget it can come right back to you. Aurora gave me that gift today. I am so grateful for Aurora Ling who is a precious member of the UniversalGiving® team.

Everyone has a team. It might be at work; a certain Business Unit; a wrestling team – you’re the coach or you’re on it; your Quaker prayer meeting, mosque, family or after school Physics class.

Be grateful for everything, and especially for your team, today! 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: What We Can Learn from the Gentle, Observant Jain Religion

 

Jainism is a group that believes we should leave barely a footprint on this earth. They believe in gentility, kindness, and care for every living creature. It’s even to the extent of not eating root vegetables because pulling up the roots makes the plant die. Jains honor every living thing.

 

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Founded in a similar time frame as Buddhism, Jainism primarily existed in Hindu parts of India. In the present day it is a small but powerful minority among the world’s religions, with some 4 million followers in India and growing communities elsewhere in the world. A few core beliefs of Jainism include that every living being has a soul; non-violence is the path to right thinking; attachment to possessions should be limited, and one’s life should be lived to be useful to others.

May we be gentle, respectful and observant of the preciousness of life in all its form.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Roman Kraft on Unsplush

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Give Back to a Youth- Without Money

 

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Do you know what some of the greatest needs of our youth today are?

Love.

Trust.

Safety.

Kindness.

 

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So many of our youth need tangible, practical support.

Here are three key areas:

1. Emotional Support

That’s having someone who’s there to listen and to support you with whatever you are feeling, or facing.

2. Inspirational Support

This means that you are encouraging them to live their best lives and showing they can take a step forward, they can make a difference in their lives. Eventually, you want it to be not just about them, but about the future world that they’ll help create.

 

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3. High Level Support

These are conversations that help youth understand how the world works and how they can impact the world. This makes them feel like their day-to-day and the world is “navigable”. How in a job they can support their future family. How they can march for freedom. How there is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to help them get food and day-to-day support.

4. High-Level Attention

Many kids have been neglected. They might have been left on the streets. Or they might have parents who don’t have time for them, or don’t wish to spend time.

So how is it, exactly, that you can help? With your committed, High-Level Attention. Here some of the qualities that you can embody with any youth you encounter.

 

Be nurturing.

Provide friendship.

Give them some love.

Express compassion.

Be empathetic.

Affirm every good decision and every good word they speak.   

Help be a model for caring relationships, by caring for them.

 

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    5. Recognize Any Accomplishment

During your time with them, you can identify their strengths and I would repeat it often. Remember, they missed out on needed, life-giving encouragement.   Everyone needs to hear that they’re good at something and often.

Recognize them for any accomplishment.

 

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Celebrate their accomplishments, and often. Bring it up again and again. You’re essentially saying:

I see you

I See You Too,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Mm Teng on Unsplash
Fig².  Photo by Sue Zeng on Unsplash
Fig³.  Photo by RhondaK on Unsplash
Fig⁴.  Photo by Jeffrey Lin on Unsplash
Fig⁵.  Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Smile Is a Blessing” – Mpho Tutu

 

“A smile is a blessing…It really doesn’t take that much to live into our blessing and make the world better for each person we encounter during our day.”

-Mpho Tutu

 

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This quote is from Mpho Tutu, the daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and an ordained minister herself.

She was quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, in an article discussing her and her father’s new book, Made for Goodness. She also said that they hope the book will help people to “recognize in themselves their own innate goodness.”

How can we each be a blessing to another person today?

 


The Reverend Mpho A. Tutu, an Episcopal priest, is the founder and Executive Director of the Tutu Institute for Prayer & Pilgrimage. Ms. Tutu has run ministries for children in the downtown Worcester, Massachusetts; for rape survivors in Grahamstown, SA; and for refugees from South Africa and Namibia at the Phelps Stokes Fund in New York City. She earned her MDiv from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts and began her ordained ministry at Historic Christ Church in Alexandria, Virginia. Ms. Tutu is married to Joseph Burris; they have two daughters, Nyaniso and Onalenna.

Bio Source: The Tutu Institute for Prayer & Pilgrimage Official Website


Fig¹.  Photo by Adrianna Van Groningen on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Happy Woman…or a Cheerful Woman

 

“A happy woman is one who has no cares at all; a cheerful woman is one who has cares but doesn’t let them get her down.”

— Beverly Sills

 

We all go through troubles. That doesn’t mean it wrecks our day. It doesn’t color every moment!

 

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Be cheery and filled with good wishes for all, including yourself.

Beverly Sills was a world class musician and vocal artist. She supported the arts and helped bring some of musical institutions back to financial viability, such as City Opera. It faced extreme financial troubles, and was the hardest hit during the AIDS crisis. They lost dozens of valuable conductors, musicians, singers and operations people. They were hit hard financially, and heart-wise.

 

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But Beverly Sills used her influence, financial power, personality and knowledge of music to turn around their future. It looked hopeless – and she made it full of hope! She brought cheer back through her cheery personality and expectation of good. 

 

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The sun still shines, even when covered by a cloud. It’s still there. So is your happiness. So is your joy. Sometimes it seems covered a bit, and then, we rediscover it in a more resplendent, beautiful way.

I’m Going Forward with Cheerfulness for You and Me,

Pamela

 


Beverly Sills was a singer and opera star. She was born Belle Miriam Silverman on May 25, 1929, in Brooklyn, New York. A gifted soprano, Sills was one of America’s most famous opera performers. At the age of three, she won a radio contest and soon began singing on the radio regularly as Bubbles Silverman. Sills studied opera with a voice coach as a child, and made her operatic debut in 1947 at the Philadelphia Civic Opera. After years of trying, Beverly Sills achieved her dream of singing with the New York City Opera in 1955. She played the role of Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus, earning strong reviews. After taking some time away from the stage to handle family matters, she returned stronger than ever in the 1966 New York City Opera production of Handel’s Julius Caesar.

During her long career, Beverly Sills received many honors, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980. She has written books about her life, including 1987’s Beverly: An Autobiography. She was married to journalist Peter B. Greenough from 1956 until his death in 2006. The couple had two children together. In her retirement, Beverly Sills continued a life of charitable work, notably as a longtime chairwoman of the board of trustees of the March of Dimes.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Judith Grossman on Unsplush
Fig². Claude-Pascal Perna on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: I Love What Howard Zinn Writes: Hope Is Not Certainty… but Being Open to Possibilities…

 

“…I intend to be the voice of reasonable optimism, to figure out a passage through this tough time. To have hope, one does not need certainty, only possibility.”

-Howard Zinn

 

I love how Howard Zinn focuses on maintaining the human spirit. Throughout his life dedication to combatting injustice, striving to help those marginalized, and being involved in a brutal World War, Howard held his views of hope.

 

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Let’s keep our minds open to the great possibilities which abound before us. There is always a way, a pathway, a new opportunity, a new possibility. A New Hope!

 


Howard Zinn (1922-2010) was a historian, author, and activist. He was a pilot in WWII, an experience which shaped his outspoken opposition of war. He was a professor of political science for many years at Boston University as well as Spelman College. He is best known for his book, A People’s History of the United States, presenting history from the point of view of the marginalized. Zinn married Roslyn Shechter in 1944. They had a daughter, Myla, and a son, Jeff.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia Commons

The Classic Pamela Positive: Deal with the Complete Person – Zig Ziglar

 

Man is tridimensional (physical, mental, and spiritual). I deal with the complete person. This is the only way to have complete success.”

-Zig Ziglar

 

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We can’t just deal with people from one viewpoint. We all have such important, varied qualities about us. And that’s changing moment by moment… and needs to be honored moment by moment. Who the person is holistically, when honored, brings the greatest benefit to your relationship, your environment, your work, your home.

 

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In addition, Zig was known as one of the most positive, joyful people. He wanted to celebrate people; celebrate them for who they are. And so he also celebrated life for who he is: A positive family man; a father and grandfather; a leader; a kind person; a doer of good; a prolific speaker; an engaging writer; and an encourager of others. That’s the holistic Zig Ziglar.

 


Hilary Hinton “Zig” Ziglar was a motivational speaker, emphasizing Christian values and achieving success in all areas of life. He was born in Alabama in 1926, to a large family and he was the tenth of twelve children. His family lived there for a few years before moving to Mississippi. Zig dealt with tragedy early in his childhood– losing his father and little sister within the same week. He moved to South Carolina to take part in the Navy Training program at the University of South Carolina. Later, he would join forces to create a company that aimed to change America’s view of salesperson through seminars. This would begin his long and successful time as a speaker that traveled around the country.

He was the author of nine books, including See You at the Top and Raising Positive Kids in a Negative World. In 2001, Ziglar was awarded the Cavett Award by The National Speakers Association for bringing honor to the profession and showing commitment to mentoring other members. He passed away November 2012, after his 40-year speaking career brought him to consult for Fortune 500 companies and leaders around the world. He was married to Jean Ziglar and they had four children and seven grandchildren.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by DBN-USA Dennis Vosper on flickr
Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels