Tag Archives: Love

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

 

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

 

 


Citations:

Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What’s Important to You Is Important to Me”

 

 

“What’s Important To You Is Important To Me”

 

 

grayscale photography of two boys hugging while laughing

 

 

This is one of my favorite statements.  It helps me understand and sincerely care about others.  When we truly listen to our family, friends, partners, team mates, improv players, then we can really hear…what’s important.

 

Sometimes it might be a clean kitchen.  For others, it might be taking the dog for a walk or getting the car cleaned.  Or it might be that you showed up at your daughter’s gymnastics recital. And sometimes, sitting down and listening to your boyfriend, while not multitasking and cleaning the dishes at the same time, may be the biggest sign of attention. It can even be as small as keeping your desk clean at work because you know it inspires your manager.

 

 

men's gray button-up shirt

 

 

The point is, we all fall into habits.  These habits are what are most comfortable, and convenient, for us.  They are our priorities. But they are not necessarily important to others.  Instead, we need to take a look at what motivates others.

 

So even if we can live with a messy desk, if we know the manager is inspired to see an ordered workspace, then we can try to rise to that new standard.  If it bothers our companion that we’re doing something else while he’s talking about a serious issue, then we need to stop and sit down, and give our undivided attention.  If it makes a difference to our mom that we check the stove one more time before we leave the kitchen, then we make her feel cared for, and can do it again.

 

 

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These are the small and important ways that we can let someone know they are important to us.

 

It’s the Substance of what builds or breaks down any relationship.

 

Many of us have felt that overwhelmingly warm feeling when someone does something for us… It specifically hits our hearts.  “Ah…how grateful I am that they took out the recycling!  I love an ordered home…” It’s something that puts you at peace. And that positive energy allows you to give more.

 

 

brown wooden panel with white heart

 

 

“What’s Important to You is Important to Me.”

 

What a beautiful way to live…

 

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Aman Shrivastava on Unsplash

Fig². Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

Fig³. Camylla Battani on Unsplash

Fig⁴. Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “When You Learn Something From People…it is a Gift” – Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

“When you learn something from people or from a culture, you accept it as a gift, and it is your lifelong commitment to preserve that gift and to build on that gift.”

— Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

Making Music across Borders: Yo-Yo Ma

 

 

Yo-Yo Ma is a world renowned cellist.  He could be so high and proud. Yet he is humble and learning. That is so he can be the best musician and person.

 

Appreciate the gifts people offer you…and thank them by passing on their gift to others, whether through appreciation, gratitude, love, recognition, sincerity.  Life and music are about giving.

 

We thank Yo-Yo Ma for his contribution to music and the world.

 

And I am thanking you for your personal gift to the world, whatever that might be!

 

Lovingly,

Pamela

 


Yo-Yo Ma is one of the world’s most famous cellists. He has recorded more than 90 albums and received 19 Grammy Awards.

Ma was born in Paris, though the family moved to New York when he was five. He comes from a musical family. His mother was a singer and his father was a violinist; his older sister is also a violinist. A child prodigy, Ma began playing the cello at age four, and performed for John F. Kennedy and Dwight Eisenhower at the age of seven. He attended Julliard at age nine, and went on to study at Harvard. He has performed with orchestras around the world, and has put out 75 albums.

Ma currently plays with the Silk Road Ensemble; their goal is to bring together musicians from the countries which are historically linked by the Silk Road, an ancient trade route linking southeast Asia through the Middle East to northern Africa and the Mediterranean coast of Europe.

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Yo-Yo Ma Official Website https://www.yo-yoma.com/

Fig¹. World Economic Forum on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Can’t Buy Happiness

 

 

Money cant buy happiness.  Sometimes we forget this. Remember, it was the Beatles who brought this up through their songs. They had powerful messages which made us think. 

 

 

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So the next time you are enjoying one of their songs, remember, too, their life advice. Money cant buy happiness.

Strong relationships do. Working at something you love can bring it. Spending time with those you respect does. Adhering to your values does. Relationships, sincere work, people and values bring you happiness. 

 

 

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Focus on those four areas, and not only will you have happiness, but the money will come. Youll be doing what you love to do, and that will surely be compensated.

Do What You Love, Do It With Love,

Pamela

 

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Wikimedia commons

Fig². Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India, when we meet and greet and we say ‘Namaste’, which means: I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace”

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

—Ram Dass

 

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

 

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

 

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Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

 

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing.  Be amazed.

 

 

sailboat on body of water during daytime

 

 

Who amazes you today?

 

For me, it is my Mom and my sister. Both great people, great moms, and shining lights of caring for others.

 

 


 

Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions.  He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path.  His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet.  He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

BioSources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Brooke Cagle on Unsplash
Fig². Kevin Noble on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If It Is Right, It Happens…Nothing Good Gets Away” – John Steinbeck

 

 

Heartfelt advice is such wonderful wealth.   And its even more meaningful when its in a letter, which someone took the time to write, and shape with their own beautiful language, handwriting and style. 

 

 

person about to write on white printer paperr

 

 

This is one of my favorites, between a father and a son. John Steinbeck wrote to his son about the meaning of love.  I really dont need to say anything else.

 

 

person holding bouquet of flower

 

 

Enjoy this sincere, kind wisdom. I almost feel its warmth emanating from the pagesof care, of experience, of hope, of trust.  May we all trust love.

 

 

“Love…is an outpouring of everything good in you–of kindness, and consideration and respect–not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable…[This] can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had…And don’t worry about losing.  If it is right, it happens–the main thing is not to hurry.  Nothing good gets away.” 

John Steinbeck, to his son Thom

 

 


 

John Steinbeck was a Nobel Prize-winning author, whose most famous works include The Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and Of Mice and Men. 

Born in 1902, Steinbeck grew up in a small city in Monterey County in California, the son of German immigrants. The community was extremely rural and he worked with migrants on a farm. He later said that this taught him about the struggles of migrant life and the potentially bad aspects of human nature. In 1919, he went on to study English Literature at Stanford University. He later left without graduating and he would struggle to find jobs to support him while writing. In 1942, he met and married Gywndolyn Conger and they had two sons together. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize for Literature. Steinbecks works often addressed social issues such as ecology, cultural standards and the condition of laborers.

BioSource: Wikipedia

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Neven Krcmarek on Unsplash
Fig². Amy Shamblen on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Top Thing Everyone Loves

 

 

“Smiling is Free”

– Dove Love

 

 

Two Brown Cookies

 

 

It’s one of the greatest things.

 

Don’t forget to do this.

 

Everyone loves this.

 

And even if they are having a really really bad day — if you smile at them — they will smile back at you, simply by reflex.

 

 

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Bring some peace to someone’s troubled heart today. I am leaving work now, and with a smile.

 

Goodnight!

Pamela

 


 

Dove Chocolate, sold as Galaxy in other countries, is a Mars Company owned and operated brand of chocolate that is virtually in all supermarkets and convenience stores across the US. They are well known for their silky and smooth texture and are well liked. However, what makes each chocolate special is the addition of a quote inside each of their wrappers, which has attracted both praise and critique from many consumers.

 

Dove Chocolate messages like “Believe in yourself,” and “Make the most of everyday,” and others dealing with hope, mindfulness, and inspiration, bring positivity to the life of the reader. However, some people feel that sayings like “Too much of a good thing is still wonderful,” and “Do what feels right,” are misleading and maybe giving people bad advice, and have been poking fun at the wrapper messages. You can take a look at photos of their wrappers by clicking here and you can read a compilation of their messages here.

 


 

Citations:
Fig¹. Gratisography on Pexels
Fig². Lesly Juarez on Unsplash