Tag Archives: Love

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

In this article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

 

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

 

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

 

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


 

 

Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She was frequently featured on a number of magazines including Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Allure. She has walked on the runway for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Christian Dior. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns, and appeared in TV, music videos, and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings. 

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center. She is married to fellow model, Rande Gerber and they have two children together. 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

 

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

You look great.

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.

 

 

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Say Something Positive Today!!

 

 


 

 

All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals.  StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books.  In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps.  All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples.  Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

 

 

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It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

 

 


 

 

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Read This If You Want to See a True Team At Work

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

I just had to share what a wonderful note I received from one of my core team members, Aurora. She works in Office of the CEO, and is dedicated, professional, and really strives to serve the world! Imagine my surprise as CEO when I received this:

Hi Pamela, Sam, Ayuko,

Today (April 20th) is my birthday—and in the spirit of living and giving, I wanted to “donate” today. I’ll still send my EOD (End of Day) Report, but I won’t mark today’s three hours in PayChex.

While I personally don’t have a lot of money to donate, I at least hope that donating my time in this way can demonstrate my appreciation for UniversalGiving.

Thank you so much for all that you do, making the world a better and kinder place.

Best,

Aurora

PS: I’ve been accepted to Princeton’s PhD program for Politics, focusing on International Relations. I requested a one-year deferral so that I can start a church with my friends first in 2018; and, Princeton approved of the deferral request! So, I’ll be getting my PhD starting Fall 2019! Thank you for all your support since September, encouraging me to grow as a professional and as a person.

 

 

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As CEO, you have a lot of news, positive and challenging, that you receive every day. Imagine when I received such positive news above. A team member so dedicated, caring and loving.  It fills your heart. You certainly don’t expect it and when it happens, you are floating with gratitude for days.

And so here was my response.  It’s so important to be grateful, but also to recognize and celebrate their lives holistically:

Dear Aurora!   What inspiring and exciting news… CONGRATULATIONS! I am calling you right now.   Aurora, that is just wonderful news on all fronts.

First, on Princeton. What an achievement.  We are so pleased you are advancing in such a wonderful way.  What a gift for them and you to have this opportunity! You will learn so much on the international front… I can’t wait to hear!

Second, great you are accomplishing your goals on the church front.  Aung and I pray and say affirmations in the office, and it’s lovely. He’s Buddhist and I’m Christian, and it’s a great way for us to share and give strength to our world and UniversalGiving.   So good for you accomplishing this spiritual goal for yourself. Sharing positivity is so important, and you’ve chosen an important way!

Third, what a great gift!   To donate your hard work for today… what an honor to have your thoughtfulness. You are a true, dear, kind ethical and utmost caring person. How honored we are to have you!   That will sing in my heart for many years to come. I’m also CC-ing a few other core team members from UniversalGiving, because we love to celebrate our positive culture and any good news!

Thank you again, Aurora, for your great news, and sharing it with our UniversalGiving Family. We are rejoicing for you!  Great job! Wonderful! Upwards you go, dear Aurora!

Warmly and with Great Gratitude,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Sometimes, when we work at a nonprofit or do good in the world, we forget it can come right back to you. Aurora gave me that gift today. I am so grateful for Aurora Ling who is a precious member of the UniversalGiving team.

Everyone has a team. It might be at work; a certain Business Unit; a wrestling team – you’re the coach or you’re on it; your Quaker prayer meeting, mosque, family or after school Physics class.

Be grateful for everything, and especially for your team, today!   

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Top Thing Everyone Loves

“Smiling is Free”

 

Love,

   Dove
smile

It’s one of the greatest things.

 

Don’t forget to do this.

 

Everyone loves this.

 

And even if they are having a really really bad day – if you smile at them — they will smile back at you, simply by reflex.

 

 

 

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Bring some peace to someone’s troubled heart today. I am leaving work now, and with a smile.

 

Good night!

– Pamela

Dove Chocolate, sold as Galaxy in other countries, is a Mars Company owned and operated brand of chocolate that is virtually in all supermarkets and convenience stores across the US. They are well known for their silky and smooth texture and are well liked. However, what makes each chocolate special is the addition of a quote inside each of their wrappers, which has attracted both praise and critique from many consumers.
Dove Chocolate messages like “Believe in yourself,” and “Make the most of everyday,” and others dealing with hope, mindfulness, and inspiration, bring positivity to the life of the reader. However, some people feel that sayings like “Too much of a good thing is still wonderful,” and “Do what feels right,” are misleading and may be giving people bad advice, and have been poking fun at the wrapper messages. You can take a look at photos of their wrappers by clicking here and you can read a compilation of their messages here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Love: Vulnerability Balanced with Courage

 

 “I have learned about love. Love should be easy, free in connection; work, wonderfully so, as in investment; vulnerability balanced with courage, and always undergirded with trust. It should be grace, graced and grateful. It should uplift you.”

 

 

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Love – we feel it, we know it, we believe in it. And I think it truly is indispensable.. we can’t live without it. As we peel away the layers of love… one I’d like to cover today is:

 

Vulnerability Balanced with Courage.

 

Love isn’t always easy for we must be open.  Are you willing to love even if you are hurt?

 

Because a relationship didn’t work the way you’d prefer… or a church committee member spoke harshly to you… your idea got shot down at work or a precious pet ascended to heaven…

 

I know… it hurts… of course it does…

 

So be gentle with yourself, first.

 

But dear leader – we have to have the courage to soften our hearts, stay receptive, and be open to love at all times.  And yes, that is at home and work.

 

 

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This allows us to give the most to the world, and to ourselves.

 

Yes, at all times.

 

I know that might be hard to hear… Hang in there…

So there may be something that shut you down recently. Well, it’s time to unshutter the door and open back up. Take your heart out of the basement, or release your self-imposed sequestration in the attic. 🙂

 

Let’s be those loving, beautiful individuals, who deserve to receive and give love. And other people need it too!

 

Remember, to receive the benefit of love, we have to have courage.

 

“Love is Vulnerability Balanced with Courage.”

 

–Sunday, November 29th, 1998. 10:20pm.

 

Won’t You Be My Neighbor: Mr Rogers’ Impact On the World

 

Mr. Rogers was an icon. He had a purity of heart that made people believe.

 

It made people believe in purity, in goodness, in kindness, in love and in allowing everyone to feel valued. He looked in their eyes and made them feel that way.

 

 

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I know it, because when I worked in broadcast at KTLA in Los Angeles, I had the honor of meeting this man.

 

 

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My job was to take care of all the on-screen talent. He was indeed authentic and caring, not only with children, but also with every adult as well. He took the time to truly look them in the eyes, to slow down, and to really care.

 

 

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If you haven’t seen the documentary, then I recommend that you go see it. It doesn’t just talk about a man and his values, it’s not about a man and children, it’s about a man who has a vision.

 

A vision that people should be loved everywhere and that people should be cherished. And he let them know it.

 

 

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That doesn’t mean his life was easy.

 

At times, he had to take a stance. At times, he had to be very strong regarding

 the state of television. 

 

He was shocked at the negativity– how all the cartoons have violence. It was so uncomfortable for such a wonderful man to see that all the goodness that he had put forth on his show every day was being eclipsed by tech warriors, video figures, bullies and negative characters. He saw that television was hurting a generation of young children and it broke his heart.

 

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So this loving man took a stance against negativity — in all forms. He used his show as a platform:

  • In 1968 Mister Rogers Neighborhood shared antiwar sentiments and messages of peace,  right in the middle of the Vietnam War — and the first year of his show. That takes courage.
  • He showcased Make-Believe episodes against arms races, and focused on purity.
  • He made food and hunger issues a prominent issue on his show.

 

We are grateful for icons such as Mr. Rogers who never gave up and fought to see positive justice for kids and their education and their learning. Watch here to see how he impacted people’s lives. You can do this too!

We’re All Trying To Be Loving,

Pamela

 


 

Fred Rogers was an American television personality, most known for his television series Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood. He was also trained as a Presbyterian minister and his trainings caused him to dislike the type of media aimed at children. This led him to create his television series, which quickly became an icon for children’s media and education. Rogers promoted racial equality, pacifism during the Gulf War, and women’s equality throughout his episodes and characters. He was also a vegetarian, an avid swimmer, and did not drink or smoke. He attended Dartmouth College before moving on to Rollins College to study music composition. There he met and married his wife, Sarah Joanne Byrd. They had a lifelong marriage and they had two sons together.