Tag Archives: Trust

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In Happy Moments…”

“In happy moments, praise God.  In the difficult moments, seek God.  In the quiet moments, trust God.  In every moment, thank God.”

– Anonymous

The Pamela Positive: Loyalty to Those Not Present

“One of the most important ways to manifest integrity is to be loyal to those who are not present.   In doing so, we build the trust of those who are present.  When you defend those who are absent, you retain the trust of those present.”

–Stephen Covey

Stephen Covey is a speaker and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.  His work focuses primarily on leadership, family and living with principle.  He is a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University.  He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren.

The Pamela Positive: “If It Is Right, It Happens…Nothing Good Gets Away”

Heartfelt advice is such wonderful wealth.   And it’s even more meaningful when it’s in a letter, which someone took the time to write, and shape with their own beautiful language, handwriting and style.

This is one of my favorites, between a father and a son. John Steinbeck wrote to his son about the meaning of love.  I really don’t need to say anything else.

Enjoy this sincere, kind wisdom. I almost feel its warmth emanating from the page…of care, of experience, of hope, of trust.  May we all trust love.

“Love…is an outpouring of everything good in you–of kindness, and consideration and respect–not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable…[This] can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had…And don’t worry about losing.  If it is right, it happens–the main this is not to hurry.  Nothing good gets away.”  — John Steinbeck, to his son Thom

John Steinbeck was a Nobel Prize-winning author, whose most famous works include The Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and Of Mice and Men.  Steinbeck’s works often address social issues such as ecology, cultural standards and the condition of laborers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “God Is Awake” – Victor Hugo

“When you have laboriously accomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”
– Victor Hugo

Mr. Hugo points to our American culture for sure: We work and work and work. We are a productive country, a do-er people. Even though lately we have so many inefficiencies in government and programs, as individuals, we ‘do.’

And so we must pause. We must reflect. We realize when we lay our heads gently down for rest, that God is watching.

She is caring and loving. He is standing guard. This loving Principle may even be shaping our thoughts so that we awake refreshed. We can start the day with greater clarity and positive purpose than the day before.

Work…Rest…Trust God…

And so we live Life fully.

sanmenxia-male-sleep-478382-o-smallVictor Hugo (1802 – 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist. He is considered as one of the most well-known French Romantic writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry. Among many volumes, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).  Les Miserables focused on social issues of the time, and helped bring these to wider attention.  Hugo was married to a childhood friend, Adele Foucher, and they had five children.

Source photo: everystockphoto.com

The Pamela Positive: If We Center Down…What Is the Vital Part That Remains?

“…if we center down…and live in that holy Silence, which is dearer than life, and take our life program into the silent places of the heart, with complete openness, ready to do, ready to renounce according to His leading, then many of the things we are doing lose their vitality for us.”

– Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, Section: The Simplification of Life

What is absolutely vital in your life today?  Are you truly called to be doing what you’re doing…or is it simply your agenda…  Align your purpose with a divine motive…

Thomas R. Kelly (1893-1941) was a Quaker educator and writer, with a focus on mysticism.  He graduated from Wilmington College, and studied at Hartford Theological Seminary with an interest in being a missionary.  During World War I, he joined the YMCA to work with the troops, and worked with German prisoners of war.  His pacifist position eventually lost him this position.  He returned to Hartford to complete his training, and married Lael Macy.  In the 1920s, Kelly and his wife went to Germany, where they were significant in founding a Quaker community.  He returned to Germany in 1938 to encourage Quakers living under Hitler.  Kelly taught at a number of universities throughout the 1930s.  His collection of writing, A Testament of Devotion, was published posthumously by a colleague.

The Pamela Positive: “We Need Each Other” – Sue Monk Kidd

“When a suffering is shared, its weight is divided; and when a joy is shared, the delight is multiplied.  We need each other.”

– Sue Monk Kidd, First Light, Chapter: Availability.

Sue Monk Kidd is a writer, novelist, and memoirist. She grew up in the Southern United States and her hometown of Sylvester, Georgia influenced her first and best-known book The Secret Life of Bees. As a worldwide acclaimed author, her fictional works are concentrated on the oppositions and successes of women. Kidd is inspired by Henry David Thoreau, Kate Chopin, Thomas Merton, Martha Burke, and Carl Jung as role models.

The Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe.”

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“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”
–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

Terri has it right.  What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important it is that we keep doing so.  At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so…however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth.  So we must honor them, and honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

As far as paddling one’s own canoe.  As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.”  She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together.   We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there.  She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special.  She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!