Tag Archives: Trust

The Classic Pamela Positive: “God Is Awake” – Victor Hugo

“When you have laboriously accomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”

– Victor Hugo

 

Mr. Hugo points to our American culture for sure: We work and work and work. We are a productive country, a do-er people. Even though lately we have so many inefficiencies in government and programs, as individuals, we ‘do.’

And so we must pause. We must reflect. We realize when we lay our heads gently down for rest, that God is watching.

 

 

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She is caring and loving. He is standing guard. This loving Principle may even be shaping our thoughts so that we awake refreshed. We can start the day with greater clarity and positive purpose than the day before.

Work…Rest…Trust God…

 

 

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And so we live Life fully.

 

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Victor Hugo (1802 – 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist. He is considered as one of the most well-known French Romantic writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry. Among many volumes, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).  Les Miserables focused on social issues of the time, and helped bring these to wider attention.  Hugo was married to a childhood friend, Adele Foucher, and they had five children.

Source photo: everystockphoto.com

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Be Able to Tell People ‘Great Job’ on Things That Didn’t Work”

 

“You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

— J. Kermit Campbell, former CEO of Herman Miller

 

 

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Campbell has it right.  A CEO is not an expert except in one area: getting the right people. Actually, let’s add another area: values. You must be a leader who gets the best people and demonstrates the highest values.

Even if you are a manager, you should still think this way. Empower your people to learn and maintain a domain of expertise. Hopefully, you can hire them with it. If you can’t, make sure they have the rapid capability to do so.  Let’s learn from Campbell’s advice to us:

“I don’t believe that my job is to lead design at Herman Miller.  My job is to make sure we have great design leaders, continue to listen and try to learn from them…My job is not to be a creative guy, my job is to create a culture that allows and promotes creativity…

You’re going to have to take risks. It’s not all going to work.

You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

 

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J. Kermit Campbell is a former CEO of Herman Miller, and the current Lead Independent Director of SPX Corporation.  He is an investor or board member for a number of companies and charitable organizations.  Herman Miller is a leading furniture company, founded by D. J. DePree, with a more than 100-year history.  They focus on innovation, and designing products to create a better world.

 

How You Can Give Back To A Youth- Without Money

 

 

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Do you know what some of the greatest needs of our youth today are? Love.

Trust.

Safety.

Kindness.

 

 

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So many of our youth need tangible, practical support.

Here are three key areas:

 

    1. Emotional Support

 

That’s having someone who’s there to listen and to support you with whatever you are feeling, or facing.

 

    2. Inspirational Support

 

This means that you are encouraging them to live their best lives and showing they can take a step forward, they can make a difference in their lives. Eventually, you want it to be not just about them, but about the future world that they’ll help create.

 

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    3. High Level Support

 

These are conversations that help youth understand how the world works and how they can impact the world. This makes them feel like their day-to-day and the world is “navigable”. How in a job they can support their future family. How they can march for freedom. How there is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families to help them get food and day-to-day support.

 

    4. High-Level Attention

 

Many kids have been neglected. They might have been left on the streets. Or they might have parents who don’t have time for them, or don’t wish to spend time.

So how is it, exactly, that you can help? With your committed, High-Level Attention. Here some of the qualities that you can embody with any youth you encounter.

 

 Be

      Nurturing.

Provide a

      friendship.

       Give them

          some love.

    Express

        compassion.

Be

      empathetic.

 

         Affirm every good decision

            and every good word they speak.

   

    Help be a model for caring relationships,

       by caring for them.

 

 

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    5. Recognize Any Accomplishment

During your time with them, you can identify their strengths and I would repeat it often. Remember, they missed out on needed, life-giving encouragement.   Everyone needs to hear that they’re good at something and often.

 

Recognize them for any accomplishment.

 

 

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Celebrate their accomplishments, and often. Bring it up again and again. You’re essentially saying:

 

I see you.

 

I see you too,

Pamela

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Mm Teng on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sue Zeng on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by RhondaK on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Jeffrey Lin on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Photo by Jason Leung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If It Is Right, It Happens…Nothing Good Gets Away” – John Steinbeck

 

Heartfelt advice is such wonderful wealth.   And its even more meaningful when its in a letter, which someone took the time to write, and shape with their own beautiful language, handwriting and style. 

 

 

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This is one of my favorites, between a father and a son. John Steinbeck wrote to his son about the meaning of love.  I really dont need to say anything else.

 

 

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Enjoy this sincere, kind wisdom. I almost feel its warmth emanating from the pagesof care, of experience, of hope, of trust.  May we all trust love.

 

“Love…is an outpouring of everything good in you–of kindness, and consideration and respect–not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable…[This] can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had…And don’t worry about losing.  If it is right, it happens–the main thing is not to hurry.  Nothing good gets away.” 

John Steinbeck, to his son Thom

 

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John Steinbeck was a Nobel Prize-winning author, whose most famous works include The Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and Of Mice and Men. Born in 1902, Steinbeck grew up in a small city in Monterey County in California, the son of German immigrants. The community was extremely rural and he worked with migrants on a farm. He later said that this taught him about the struggles of migrant life and the potentially bad aspects of human nature. In 1919, he went on to study English Literature at Stanford University. He later left without graduating and he would struggle to find jobs to support him while writing. In 1942, he met and married Gywndolyn Conger and they had two sons together. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize for Literature. Steinbecks works often addressed social issues such as ecology, cultural standards and the condition of laborers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Come to the Edge”

 

 

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Come to the edge, Life said.
They said, we are afraid.
Come to the edge, Life said.
They came; Life pushed them.
And they flew!

 

Poem by Christopher Logue

The Classic Pamela Positive: If We Center Down… What Is the Vital Part That Remains?

 

“… If we center down… and live in that holy Silence, which is dearer than life, and take our life program into the silent places of the heart, with complete openness, ready to do, ready to renounce according to His leading, then many of the things we are doing lose their vitality for us.”

 

– Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, Section: The Simplification of Life

 

 

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What is absolutely vital in your life today? Are you truly called to be doing what you’re doing… or is it simply your agenda? Align your purpose with a divine motive…

 

 

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Thomas R. Kelly (1893-1941) was a Quaker educator and writer, with a focus on mysticism.  He graduated from Wilmington College, and studied at Hartford Theological Seminary with an interest in being a missionary.  During World War I, he joined the YMCA to work with the troops, and worked with German prisoners of war.  His pacifist position eventually lost him this position.  He returned to Hartford to complete his training, and married Lael Macy.  In the 1920s, Kelly and his wife went to Germany, where they were significant in founding a Quaker community.  He returned to Germany in 1938 to encourage Quakers living under Hitler.  Kelly taught at a number of universities throughout the 1930s.  His collection of writing, “A Testament of Devotion”, was published posthumously by a colleague.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You’ll See Spirit Operating Everywhere” —Dan Millman

 

“Like the flower, trusting Spirit working according to a higher will beyond the reach of your mind, you’ll see Spirit operating everywhere, in everyone and everything…

 

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…To trust the process of your life. The more you trust Spirit in this way, the more you will work with it directly as a living force in your life… unfolding, like a flower, toward the Light.” 

—Dan Millman

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Dan Millman is an American writer and speaker. He was born and raised in Los Angeles, California, where he had an extremely active childhood. He took part in modern dance, trampoline, and gymnastics. Millman attended University of California, Berkeley, where he would receive study psychology. He won the 1964 Trampoline World Championships in London, earned All-American honors and won an NCAA Championship in vaulting, and in 1966 he won the USGF championship in floor exercise. He won four Gold Medals in gymnastics at the 1966 Maccabiah Games. He would go on to coach gymnastics at Stanford University, before he began conducting motivational seminars and presenting keynote speeches. He’s married to Joy Millman and they have three adult children.