Tag Archives: truth

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

meadow-680607_640Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

—✶—

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

Faith is a Living, Daring Confidence

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times” – Martin Luther

Faith is a living, daring confidence.  Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God.  And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

He meant it for discussion, but was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration and connection to life. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle.  He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant!  But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

What do you need to take a stand for today?   Join UniversalGiving and support one of our causes to make a difference today.  Click on I Want to Give my 100%! to see which special one we chose for you!

With Gratitude for the Truth,

Pamela

Martin Luther Biographymartin-luther-1076781_1280

Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.
Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.
The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university.Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.
In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.
Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture.   In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church.Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.
Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

meadow-680607_640Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

—✶—

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature…” – General Peyton C. March

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“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Gen Peyton C. March


General March had to fight – and kill – for freedom. It’s a sad moment when we come to that. In just the 20th century alone, there were more than 50 wars. By some estimates more than 160 million people have been killed in those 100 years. Unfortunately, sometimes we have to fight for the freedom we love.


Yet General Peyton also knew a deeper truth. The best thing we can give someone is peace. It’s happiness. It’s freedom.


We can build a different future. Let’s give others the gift of freedom and happiness in a peaceful way.


 
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General Peyton Conway March was born on December 27, 1864 in Easton, Pennsylvania. As the son of an academic, General March received a full education, graduating from Lafayette College in 1884 with a major in classics before attending the United States Military Academy at West Point.

General March proved himself to be a leader early on in his career during the Battle of Manila in 1898. This accomplishment allowed him to move up in the ranks and become the army chief of staff during World War I in 1918. He established the primacy of the chief of staff in the army hierarchy. His duties included presiding over the buildup of American forces in World War I,  centralizing control over supply, creating an Air Service, Tank Corps, and Chemical Warfare Service, and supervising the demobilization at war’s end. His actions played a large role in designing the powerful position of the chief of staff in the 20th century.

Frederick Palmer, a famous war correspondent during this time period, was amazed by March’s ability to focus on tasks. In turn, March expected this type of razor focus from his men. While working with him, most officers worked longer hours and increased overall efficiency. Although some people describe General March as a know-it-all, his leadership skills were never affected by his pride.

He retired as a Major General in 1921, and was advanced to General on the retired list. He had married Cora V. McEntee in 1923. He died in Washington, D.C. on 13 April 1955, and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

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A recent article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

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“Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears” – Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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“Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears”

– Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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