Tag Archives: wisdom

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

In this article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

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So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

***

Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She was frequently featured on a number of magazines including Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Allure. She has walked on the runway for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Christian Dior. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns, and appeared in TV, music videos, and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings. 

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center. She is married to fellow model, Rande Gerber and they have two children together. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Look Deeply and Recognize the Real Enemy” – Thich Nhat Hanh

“If I can say anything to you, it is to invite you to look deeply and recognize the real enemy. The enemy is not a person. That enemy is a way of thinking that has brought a lot of suffering for everyone.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh

Anything negative — is not from a person.

Radical thinking?  It shouldn’t be.   If we view the enemy as simply a thought and not a person, we depersonalize it.   It’s temporary, changeable.   And we allow the person to grow beyond it, rather than be it.

We can then eliminate personal offense, and work constructively towards a solution.

Look at the Why

If something seems to be negative, we can encourage ourselves to look at “the why.” Why might someone think, or take action, in this way?   This offers us an opportunity to develop empathy. Perhaps this person—let’s call her Jeanine—came from a difficult circumstance or has been hurt.

It’s not Jeanine who is “bad,” but the experiences which occurred in her life which impacted her.  It’s those events that led to the thinking and action behind negativity.

So Jeanine’s identity is not “Prejudice”, “Anger” or “Hurt”:

It’s instead:

The most beautiful thing about this is the following.

She can change.

Allow her to do so.  Wouldn’t we all wish to be forgiven for a past action?

Happy PeopleEvery day we can begin again.   We can embrace a fresh purity for each person in our lives, allowing us and others to lives to our fullest – with Love.

                                                                             —✶—

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Buddhist monk and Zen master.  He is a well-known poet, writer and peace activist.  A native of Vietnam, during the Vietnam War he helped found the “engaged Buddhism” movement, combining the contemplative practice of the monastery with active ministry to victims of the conflict.  He founded the School of Youth Social Service, a Buddhist University, a publishing house, and a Vietnamese peace activist magazine.

During a trip to the United States, Thich Nhat Hanh persuaded Martin Luther King, Jr. to publicly oppose the Vietnam War; King subsequently nominated him for a Nobel Peace Prize.  Thich Nhat Hanh led the Buddhist delegation to the Paris Peace Talks.

Thich Nhat Hanh is the author of more than 85 books on mindfulness and peace.  He founded the Plum Village community in France, a Buddhist community in exile.   He continues to live and work at the Plum Village, and leads retreats worldwide on “the art of mindful living.”

The Classic Pamela Positive: Give A Gift Every Day

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Give a gift every day.

Send your friend’s birthday gift early.

See a gift that would be meaningful for someone you care about, and just buy it. Give it to them now.

Take the time to cook a meal for your partner or your roommate.  Take the time to cook a meal for yourself.

Smile at a person walking down the street.

Smile at a homeless person and stop and learn their name. There is the gift of knowing someone. Of acknowledging you care.

Be kind to yourself.

Get in bed early.

Say three gratefuls before you fall asleep.

Say three gratefuls when you wake up.

Believe today is special.

Take time at lunch to be grateful for three more things.

Pay the phone bill for your roommate.

Drop off banana bread for your neighbor.

Give a lot. Expect little.

Smile at yourself in the mirror.

Work hard and attain the gift of devotion to something you believe in.

Work and leave early and give yourself a gentle night off, nurturing yourself.

Stop and look at nature. Any part of nature. The expanse of the sky; drifting clouds; a vibrant flower.

Give yourself the gift of awareness of how precious and beautiful life is every day.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Ignorance of certain subjects is a great part of wisdom.” —Hugo de Groot

“Ignorance of certain subjects is a great part of wisdom.” –Hugo de Groot

Ignorance is Good.

Ignorance of gossip. Ignorance of unnecessary negative thoughts.  Ignorance of self-doubting thoughts, and ignorance of unhelpful suggestions which come to our thought.  A lot of these thoughts are just not true…. and don’t find yourself accepting them as part of your normal experience.

 

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We all go through a tough day.  Yet we need to defend our thoughts, and therefore our life. Our life is based upon our thought. What you think will come through to fruition… It does not mean we ignore life lessons, a candid talk with ourselves; and at times, gently with others; it does not mean everything is perfect.

 

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But in general, we pursue being, doing and recognizing good. 

***

Hugo de Groot (1583-1645), also called Hugo Grotius, was a philosopher and a theologian, and worked as a jurist in the Dutch Republic.  He was extremely influential in the creation of international law.  He wrote a number of books, including On the Law of War and Peace, addressing subjects such as just wars and rules to govern conflict.  His overall purpose was to urge restraint in rushing to war, and to urge reasonable conduct once war was engaged.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Water and Wisdom Come Through — Not From — Your Brain” —Dan Millman

“Like water, higher wisdom doesn’t come as much from your brain as through it.  All you have to do is to listen and trust.”
Dan Millman, The Laws of Spirit

 

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I love this sincere quote from inspirational author Dan Millman.  It’s about trusting what already is available to us all: a Divine Inspiration that guides every moment.

You don’t have to be intellectual, smart or have high education to receive it. No, true wisdom is from the heart, from principles of goodness. It’s about being led to do the right thing.

True wisdom comes naturally.  We don’t have to think through it, manufacture it.

Let’s embrace Wisdom today.   We can live purity of right motive and action, every moment.

 

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***

Dan Millman began his career in the athletic arena.  He competed in gymnastics and trampoline in high school and college, winning international acclaim.  He became gymnastics director at Stanford University in 1968, and in 1972 moved to Oberlin College. He began writing in the 1980s, on diverse topics including fitness and philosophy.  His writing and motivational speaking tends to focus on achieving one’s potential. In 2006, his book Way of the Peaceful Warrior was adapted into a film, Peaceful Warrior.  He is married to Joy Millman, and they have three daughters and two grandchildren.

The Pamela Positive: “Do What’s Right For You…Nothing Good Happens Out of Fear.”

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“Do what’s right for you…nothing good happens out of fear.”  – Juliana Margulies

Juliana is an accomplished actress with ER and The Good Wife. As an actress, she faces fear continually in performing under pressure, or simply lining up her next role. Yet as challenging as that is, she encourages us to do what’s right for us… to follow our calling… and to never be ruled by FEAR. Remember that FEAR is False Evidence Appearing Real.  Don’t let the appearance delude you.

Follow what you are called to; follow the truth for you; and you are going to find a beautiful pathway of expression of yourself, filled with peace and happiness.

Then encourage others to do the same, so they can be their full selves too. No one deserves to be ruled by fear. Be ruled by Truth and Love.

“I wanted to convey to these students to live your life truthfully, do what’s right for you – not what others think is right for you. Nothing good happens out of fear. Do what you love doing. It might be scary because you’re taking a risk, but at the end of the day you can say you tried.” – Juliana Margulies, in a graduation speech at Sarah Lawrence, her alma mater

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy.  More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards.

The Pamela Positive: “It Is the Open-Mindedness to Little Things That Brings Human Success.”

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What a wonderful story which shows how we can all be resourceful. We can figure out a different way to achieve even our smallest needs, and maintain a positive outlook. Look up, look around, and use what you see!

It’s there for us all…It’s already been provided.

***

I said to a relative of mine, who was a professor at Harvard:
“I was cold all the time I was there, and I shivered so that my teeth shook”.
Said he: “Why did you shiver?”
“Because it was cold.”

“No, that is not the reason you shivered.”
Then I said: “I shivered because I had not bed-clothes enough.”
“No, that is not the reason.”

“Well,” said I, “Professor, you are a scientific man. I am not.
I would like to have an expert, scientific opinion now,
why I shivered.”

He arose in his own way and said:
“Young man, you shivered because you did not know any better!
Didn’t you have in your pocket a newspaper?”
“Oh, yes, I had a “Herald” and a “Journal”.”

“That is it. You had them in your pocket, and if you had spread one
newspaper over your sheet when you went to bed, you would have
been as warm as you lay there, as the richest man in America under
all his silk coverlids.

But you shivered because you didn’t know enough
to put a two-cent newspaper on your bed, and you had it in your pocket.”

It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.

***

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.