Tag Archives: wisdom

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Water and Wisdom Come Through — Not From — Your Brain” —Dan Millman

 

“Like water, higher wisdom doesn’t come as much from your brain as through it.  All you have to do is to listen and trust.”

Dan Millman, The Laws of Spirit

 

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I love this sincere quote from inspirational author Dan Millman.  It’s about trusting what already is available to us all: a Divine Inspiration that guides every moment.

You don’t have to be intellectual, smart or have high education to receive it. No, true wisdom is from the heart, from principles of goodness. It’s about being led to do the right thing.

True wisdom comes naturally.  We don’t have to think through it, manufacture it.

Let’s embrace Wisdom today.   We can live purity of right motive and action, every moment.

 

 

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Dan Millman began his career in the athletic arena.  He competed in gymnastics and trampoline in high school and college, winning international acclaim.  He became gymnastics director at Stanford University in 1968, and in 1972 moved to Oberlin College. He began writing in the 1980s, on diverse topics including fitness and philosophy.  His writing and motivational speaking tends to focus on achieving one’s potential. In 2006, his book Way of the Peaceful Warrior was adapted into a film, Peaceful Warrior.  He is married to Joy Millman, and they have three daughters and two grandchildren.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

In this article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

 

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

 

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

 

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


 

 

Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She was frequently featured on a number of magazines including Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Allure. She has walked on the runway for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Christian Dior. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns, and appeared in TV, music videos, and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings. 

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center. She is married to fellow model, Rande Gerber and they have two children together. 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

 

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

You look great.

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.

 

 

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Say Something Positive Today!!

 

 


 

 

All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals.  StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books.  In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps.  All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples.  Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out is Always Through” – Robert Frost

“The best way out is always through.”

– Robert Frost

 


 

Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard but did not graduate due to illness; he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Do Things When The Opportunities Come Along” – Warren Buffett

You do things when the opportunities come along.  I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.”  

– Warren Buffett

 

You’re an entrepreneur. A scientist. A playwright. A second-grade teacher with a curriculum you need to put together. An artist. A music organizer. A guitarist. A preacher. All of them need new ideas, new creativity, every day!

 

 

 

 

It’s exciting… and also a lot of pressure.

 

What’s happening when “you don’t have any ideas”?

 

Well, something very important is happening.

 

First, your brain cannot be on creative overdrive every moment. It needs time to recharge and build up “blank” space. It’s like saying you don’t need to sleep. Body, mind, heart and soul all need time for rest… and then you can keep giving your 100% and be charged to excel again!

 

 

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Secondly, patience is key. Just as Warren Buffett says, “if he doesn’t have an idea he doesn’t do anything.”

 

That’s really key. He’s not forcing it. He’s staying patient. He’s believing that the new idea is going to come.

 

And here’s where the real lesson is. He doesn’t make a billion dollar mistake.

 

If you get worried, push something, force an answer– it’s usually not right. So Buffett has done a brilliant but simple thing. He hasn’t made a lot of mistakes because he is not pushing it. He’s trusting the creative process. And therefore, waiting, patiently, for that wisdom. Therefore he makes billions of dollars, rather than lose billions of dollars.

 

 

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Let’s review Buffett’s wisdom again. How does this affect your life? When have you made a rushed mistake? When you have had patience

and waited for that peaceful answer? Please comment below!

“You do things when the opportunities come along. I’ve had periods in my life when I’ve had a bundle of ideas come along, and I’ve had long dry spells. If I get an idea next week, I’ll do something. If not, I won’t do a damn thing.” 

– Warren Buffett

 


 

Born in Nebraska in 1930, Warren Buffett demonstrated keen business abilities at a young age. Nebraska was hit hard by the effects of the Great Depression. Like many children of the Depression, Buffett grew up to respect the value of money.

In grade school and high school Buffett not only showed his precocious proclivity for business by delivering newspapers, but also sold stamps, Coca-Cola beverages, golf balls and magazines door-to-door. By the time he was 15, Warren had amassed $2,000 and used it to buy a 40-acre farm in Nebraska. He hired a farm laborer to work on the land, then used the profits to help pay his way through University.

He formed Buffett Partnership Ltd. in 1956, and by 1965 he had assumed control of Berkshire Hathaway. Overseeing the growth of a conglomerate with holdings in the media, insurance, energy and food and beverage industries, Buffett became one of the world’s richest men and a celebrated philanthropist. In June of 2006, Buffett announced his intention to give away most of his fortune to charity.

Buffett believes in family and has 4 children, and lives in the same hometown of Nebraska.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE”

“Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, that’s a TREE. We can’t hurt the trees!”

 

A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6, and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

 

 

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“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.”

Anyone who doesn’t have hope for our future should rethink. What a wonderful opening our world is facing where we teach elementary kids the connection between paper and our living trees…to be conscious of conserving, so that Lindsey and others grow up with conservation being a natural part of their lives.

There is a new standard of living being created, and not only our youth, but our elementary school children, are leading the way.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

 

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

 

 

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What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

 


 

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.