Tag Archives: philanthropy

The Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

 

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second?

 

three woman sitting on table while talking

 

First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change.

Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

 

Photograph of Men Having Conversation Seating on Chair

 

Second then is body language. If our body is open, or hunched over, our shoulders upright or slumped, communicates a world of information! And yes, most significantly is your “face language.” A frown or a smile will tell all, and make or break someone’s day!

 

Two Woman in Black Sits on Chair Near Table

 

Third come the words. This is actually not our main way to communicate. For us, we must take care that tone and face and body communicate positivity. There are no words that will make up for a frown. 🙂

So yes, choose your words carefully and positively, and match them with a welcoming posture and smile.

Now, you are on your way to being a great communicator!

Communicate Positively,

Pamela

 


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Fig².  Photo by Helena Lopes on Pexels

Fig³.  Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Would Make Something Happen” – Louis L’Amour

 

One of our prolific American writers from the Midwest, Louis L’Amour wrote about the rugged wilderness of the west in the 1900s. He spoke of our pioneering spirit, the need to create our future, and the adventure of it all. And so he has good advice for any entrepreneur:

 

“I would not sit waiting for some vague tomorrow, nor for something to happen. One could wait a lifetime, and find nothing at the end of the waiting. I would begin here, I would make something happen.”

-Louis L’Amour

 

Man Walking

 


Louis L’Amour was an American author. He is best known for his Western fiction novels, though he also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction, poetry and short-story collections.  He was born Louis Dearborn LaMoore on March 22, 1908, the last of seven children.  He grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, a medium-sized farming community.  As he grew older, he traveled throughout the United States and abroad, in various positions including as a mine assessment worker, a professional boxer and a merchant seaman.

In the 1930s, Louis and his family settled in Oklahoma, and Louis turned his focus to writing.  He began to have success with short stories in the late ‘30s and ‘40s, beginning to sell novels in the 1950s.  Louis also served in the United States Army during World War II. Louis ultimately wrote 89 novels and more than 250 short stories.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


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The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make My Life a Little Light” -M. Bentham-Edwards

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives. See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light, Within the world to glow; A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

―M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Build Your Global Business by Listening

 

So you are building a business. That’s wonderful!

One of the most important things we can do when we build, is to Listen. Listening helps us understand what our clients need. It tells us what we can produce that is of value. And it shows that we care.

This is even more important when we are working with people all over the world. When getting involved internationally, it’s even more important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community. To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world. You will then build the best product, and build the best team, for the world. 

 

People Having Meeting

 

In addition, Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And, you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

Of course, this opens your business up to new opportunities.

So it’s not just another day at work today. Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about doing so each moment. Then, it’s not work, but meaningful communication, a meaningful product, a meaningful team, a meaningful life, moment by moment.  Listen to attain your business bliss!

 

Woman Sitting on Gray Chair

 

Listening Is Living,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

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The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

 

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?

Have faith, then take another step.

 

Person Walking on the Field

 

That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!

 

Love,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Quang Nguyen Vinh on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

man wearing knit cap on grey background

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website


Citations:

1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fig¹.  Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Your Daily Life Is Your Temple And Your Religion. When You Enter Into It Take With You Your All.” – Khalil Gibran

 

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

 

So how can we do that?

 

white mosque on daytime

 

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


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