Tag Archives: quotes

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make My Life a Little Light” -M. Bentham-Edwards

 

Dear Living and Giving Readers,

Could you make your life a little light today? Find someone to help.

You can shine a little light in their lives. See how M. Bentham-Edwards encourages us to make our lives a light, a flower, a song, a staff.

You can do this today!

 

macro photography of heart shape sand decor

 

Light Someone’s Life Up Today,

Pamela

 

“God make my life a little light, Within the world to glow; A tiny flame that burneth bright 

  Wherever I may go. 

God make my life a little flower, 

  That giveth joy to all, 

Content to bloom in native bower,

  Although its place be small. 

God make my life a little song,

  That comforteth the sad;

That helpeth others to be strong,

  And makes the singer glad. 

God make my life a little staff, 

  Whereon the weak may rest, 

That so what health and strength I have 

  May serve my neighbors best.”

―M. Bentham-Edwards

 


Betham-Edwards was the fourth daughter of a farmer, Edward Edwards (c.1808–1864) and his wife Barbara (1806–1848), daughter of William Betham (1749–1839), an antiquary and cleric. She was educated in Ipswich country and as a governess-pupil at a school in London.

Her first novel, The White House by the Sea (1857) was an immediate success. Matilda studied French and German abroad and then settled with her sister in Suffolk to manage the farm which had belonged to her father. Not content with purely rural occupations, she contributed from time to time to Household Words, having the advantage at this time of the friendship of Charles Dickens and an early association with Charles and Mary Lamb, friends of her mother. Betham-Edwards is often cited in anthologies of lesbian poetry, but there is no strong evidence that she had lesbian tendencies. She died in Hastings, Sussex in 1919.  

BioSource: Wikipedia

Fig. ₁: Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Light Trumps Darkness, Every Time” – Jodi Picoult

 

“There’s always going to be bad stuff out there. But here’s the amazing thing: Light trumps darkness, every time. You can stick a candle into the dark, but you can’t stick the dark into the light.”

— Jodi Picoult

 

 

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So then we must do the same. No matter how tough your situation is, you can light a candle. It may be small but it is enduring. Bring that light into your worry, and the light will dispel the darkness– and pave a way!

 

 

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I’m lighting my candle,

Pamela

 


Jodi Picoult is an American author with 14 million copies of her books in print worldwide. She wrote her first story at age 5, titled “The Lobster Which Misunderstood.” With a degree from Princeton University in writing and a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, Jodi took a variety of jobs before Nineteen Minutes became her first book to debut at #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list. In total, Jodi is the bestselling author of eighteen novels, five of which have been adapted for film and TV.

Jodi, her husband Tim and their three children live in Hanover, New Hampshire with two Springer spaniels, a rescue puppy, two donkeys, two geese, one duck, eight chickens, and the occasional Holstein.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Jack B on Unsplash

Fig². Paolo Nicolello on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

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So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

 

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

 

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s.  She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I love That… In The Toughest Moments…He Never…Gets Distracted By The Chatter…He Just Keeps…Moving Forward” -Michelle Obama

 

“And I love that even in the toughest moments, when we’re all sweating it – when we’re worried that the bill won’t pass, and it seems like all is lost – Barack never lets himself get distracted by the chatter and the noise. Just like his grandmother, he just keeps getting up and moving forward… with patience and wisdom, and courage and grace.”

— Michelle Obama

 

   

You may face distraction.

 

 

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But your job is to remain calm and focused on the task at hand.

 

 

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That’s called character and grace, and we are called to it every day.

Believing you can be your best,

Pamela

 

 


Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States and wife of U.S. President Barack Obama, was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois. By the sixth grade, Michelle was taking classes in her school’s gifted program. She went on to attend Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the city’s first magnet high school for gifted children, where, among other activities, she served as the student government treasurer. She attended Princeton University, graduating cum laude in 1985, and went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1988.

After law school, Michelle worked as an associate in the Chicago branch of the firm Sidley Austin, in the area of marketing and intellectual property. It was there, in 1989, that she met her future husband, Barack Obama, a summer intern to whom she was assigned as an adviser. After two years of dating, Barack proposed, and the couple married on October 3, 1992. Their daughters, Malia and Sasha, were born in 1998 and 2001, respectively. On November 6, 2012, Barack Obama was reelected for a second term as U.S. president. After Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Michelle Obama accompanied her husband with their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, onto the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago, where President Obama delivered his victory speech. As first lady, she focused her attention on current social issues, such as poverty, healthy living and education.


Citations:

Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

Fig. 2: Photo by Frank Mckenna on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is one of our most renowned writers, philosophers, and literary creators. He came from a wealthy family; he didn’t need to do a lot if he didn’t want to.  But he used his skills to create literature that made us think.  Additionally, top leaders of the day came to him to hear his thoughts, which were profound and inspirational. So not only did he create excellent works of literary art, but he also engaged world leaders with his deep thinking. They became better people, because of him. They sought him out for his thoughts.

 

We can learn from Goethe. The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D.

 

 

man wearing white top using MacBook

 

 

and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities.

 

But you might also simply smile peacefully

 

 

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and joyously to all that come your way.

 

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Tim Gouw on Unsplush

Fig². Jamie Brown on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “There is a whole vista out there I didn’t anticipate.” – Jane Fonda

 

 

Jane Fonda was once asked what she learned, through a multi-talented, 60+ year career what she learned about handling the peaks and the valleys…. Here is what she had to say.

 

“Embrace it all. And it doesn’t have to peak and then be all downhill. I am over the hill in a chronological sense, but there is a whole vista out there that I didn’t anticipate. So you can reach the peak and then you can go down and it can be just as interesting. It’s a good idea not to pay too much attention to what other people think are the peaks and valleys.”

—Jane Fonda

 

 

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How we should be encouraged to see the vistas!

You’re not going down, you are just being grateful for the new vista, the next new vista. Stay looking up and onwards.

 

I’m Keeping Vista Views for us All,

Pamela

 

 


Jane Seymour Fonda (born December 21, 1937)is an American actress, writer, producer, political activist, fitness guru, and former fashion model. She is the recipient of various accolades including two Academy Awards, two BAFTA Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a Primetime Emmy Award, the AFI Life Achievement Award, and the Honorary Golden Lion. In addition to her acting, Fonda became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War. She traveled to North Vietnam in 1972 — a visit that caused an uproar back at home. Fonda also fought for social causes, serving as a spokesperson on issues of civil rights and women’s rights.

She was born in New York City on December 21, 1937. Her parents were Canadian-born socialite Frances Ford Brokaw (née Seymour; 1908–1950), and actor Henry Fonda (1905–1982). According to her father, their surname came from an Italian ancestor who immigrated to the Netherlands in the 1500s. She has a brother, Peter, who is also an actor, and a maternal half-sister, Frances de Villers Brokaw (aka “Pan”), whose daughter is Pilar Corrias, the owner of the Pilar Corrias Gallery in London.  Fonda has been married three times — all of these unions ended in divorce. The daughter of acclaimed actor Henry Fonda, the actress has won two Oscars.

BioSource: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY


Citation:

Fig¹: Brad Barmore on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “If Only You Try” – Dr. Seuss

 

 

“Think Left And Think Right And Think Low And Think High.  Oh, The Things You Can Think Up If Only You Try”

 – Dr. Seuss

 

 

There’s never a point of giving up. As Dr. Seuss says, there’s so many things you can think up— if you only try.

 

 

close-up photo of Thought Catalog book

 

 

Did you know that more 2,500 thoughts go through your head every hour?¹ Did you know that more than 60,000 ideas run through your mind on a single day? That means you’re filled with right ideas; right creativity; and new pathways.

 

 

Sweethearts Dream Big box

 

 

You can’t be stuck in a job, feel there’s no way out of a relationship, feel blocked in a relationship, feel stuck in a partnership, or stuck in anything!   You don’t have to feel trapped in a job, trapped in a salary range, or concerned about tomorrow. You don’t even have to have faith in a larger being or universe, even Dr. Seuss encourages us to think, to try! And with that, we will find our way.

 

I’m Finding My Way With You,

Pamela

 

 


Theodor Seuss Geisel(1904-1991), better known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, was a writer and cartoonist who published over 60 books. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, under the name of Dr. Seuss in 1937. Dr. Seuss won numerous awards for his work, including the 1984 Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, three Emmys and three Grammys.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts. His father, Theodor  Robert Geisel, was a successful brewmaster; his mother was Henrietta Seuss Geisel. At age 18, Geisel left home to attend Dartmouth College, where he became the editor in chief of its humor magazine, Jack-O-Lantern. When Geisel and his friends were caught drinking in his dorm room one night, in violation of Prohibition law, he was kicked off the magazine staff, but continued to contribute to it using the pseudonym “Seuss.” After graduating from Dartmouth, Geisel attended the University of Oxford in England, with plans to eventually become a professor. While studying at Oxford, Dr. Seuss met his future wife, Helen Palmer. The couple married in 1927 and moved back to the United States the same year. Dr. Seuss never had any children of his own.

Biosource: BIOGRAPHY


Citations:

¹ Sasson, Remez, “How Many Thoughts Does Your Mind Think in One Hour?”, Success Consciousness, https://www.successconsciousness.com/blog/inner-peace/how-many-thoughts-does-your-mind-think-in-one-hour/

Fig. ¹: Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

Fig. ²: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash