Tag Archives: quotes

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Future Will Belong To The Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, The More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

 

“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

 

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We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon. We’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

 

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Even if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

 

green and brown hills near sea

 

Look up to the sky.

I remember as a child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named. The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky. And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was a bit of perfection. It was a peacefulness in my childhood.

 

selective photo of a girl holding bubbles

 

So technology does seem to reign at times. It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it. It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker. Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join Me In Appreciating Whatever Nature Is In Front Of You Today,

Pamela

 


Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community. He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world. Louv is also the Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s Child in Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine. Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University. In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio Source: Richard Louv Official Website  Fig¹. Photo by Herr Bohn on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash  Fig³.  Photo by Luc Dobigeon on Unsplash  Fig⁴. Photo by Leo Rivas on Unsplash 

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Close You Are To Success? -Thomas A. Edison

 

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.”

-Thomas A. Edison

 

That’s a shocking statement. How close you are to success….

You can do it…

You could do it…

You are ascending the mountain…

 

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and you stop.

How close are you? Connect with your true, heart-deep motivation. Instead of focusing on blocks, frustration or being tired, you can focus on why you are doing what you do.

They Gave Up. They Didn’t Realize. They Were So Close! Success was just there….. all what Edison tells us.

So what will you do today? Give up or cross over? Give up or stand up? Give up or ascend? Continue on your pathway, and firmly but gently, success will lead you.

Thank you, dear Thomas Edison, as we know you failed thousands of times. Yet your success still shines in our lives today.

 


Edison was born in 1847 in the canal town of Milan, Ohio. In 1859 Edison began working on a local branch of the Grand Trunk Railroad, selling newspapers, magazines, and candy. At one point he also conducted chemical experiments in a baggage-car laboratory.

In 1868 Edison became an independent inventor in Boston. Edison soon acquired a reputation as a first-rank inventor. In 1871, Edison married 16-year-old Mary Stilwell, whom he had met two months earlier. She was an employee at one of his shops. They had three children.  While working on the telephone in the summer of 1877, Edison discovered a method of recording sound, and in the late fall he unveiled the phonograph. Finally, beginning in the fall of 1878, Edison devoted thirty months to developing a complete system of incandescent electric lighting.

In 1886, at the age of thirty-nine, Edison married the 20-year-old Mina Miller. They also had three children together. By the time of his death on October 18, 1931, Edison had received 1,093 U.S. patents, a total still untouched by any other inventor. Even more important, he created a model for modern industrial research.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Mathias Jensen on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “Go Instantly And Do The Thing” – Phillip Brooks

 

“If you could only know and see and feel, all of a sudden, that ‘the time is short,’ how it would break the spell. How you would go instantly and do the thing, which you might never have another chance to do!”

―Phillip Brooks

 

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There is no time to hesitate. Do you see a way that you can go good? Then we must do it now.

Slow down to help someone across the street.

I know it’s hard, but let someone in front of you on the highway.

Smile to someone who is waiting at the bus stop.

Save part of your dinner and bring it over to your neighbor, unexpectedly.

Be warm, be kind, even when you feel stressed.

 

Soldier Giving Red Fruit on 2 Children during Daytime

 

Time to do good now. You will find a way. Look and the opportunities abound to give back, give forward, give all around.  

Give Where We Can Today,

Pamela

 


Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 – January 23, 1893) was an American Episcopal clergyman and author, long the Rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and briefly Bishop of Massachusetts, and particularly remembered as the lyricist of the Christmas hymn, O Little Town of Bethlehem.

Born in Boston, Brooks was descended through his father, William Gray Brooks, from the Rev. John Cotton; through his mother, Mary Ann Phillips, he was a great-grandson of Samuel Phillips, Jr., founder of Phillips Academy (Andover, Massachusetts). Three of Brooks’ five brothers – Frederic, Arthur and John Cotton – were eventually ordained in the Episcopal Church. Phillips Brooks prepared for college at the Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard University in 1855 at the age of 20, where he was elected to the A.D. Club. He worked briefly as a school teacher at Boston Latin.

During the American Civil War, he upheld the cause of the North and opposed slavery, and his sermon on the death of Abraham Lincoln was an eloquent expression of the character of both men. His sermon at Harvard’s commemoration of the Civil War dead in 1865 likewise attracted attention nationwide. Brooks’s understanding of individuals and of other religious traditions gained a following across a broad segment of society, as well as increased support for the Episcopal Church. Within his lifetime, he received honorary degrees from Harvard (1877) and Columbia (1887), and the Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of Oxford, England (1885).

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Juliano Ferreira on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Want The Whole Person.” – D. J. Depree

 

“Henry Ford said, “bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.” D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: “I want all of you here. I want the whole person.”

- J. Kermit Campbell

 

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Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do. It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

 


J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company. In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children. In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law. D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor. D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company. D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Herman Miller Official Website, Fowler, Glenn, Dec. 13, 1999, D. J. DePree, Who Broke Ground In Furniture Design, Is Dead at 99, The New York Times, http://bit.do/fg6Lq  Fig¹.  Photo by David Martin on Unsplash 

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution To Any Relationship Problem

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

― Abraham Lincoln

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

woman walking along pathway during daytime

 

Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves being right.

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end. Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

It wins no battles. Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets

 

We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led. Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful. It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

Two Women Sitting on Ground Near Bonfire

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family. It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 


Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He is regarded as one of America’s greatest heroes due to his role as savior of the Union and emancipator of slaves. His rise from humble beginnings to achieving the highest office in the land is a remarkable story. His eloquent support of democracy and insistence that the Union was worth saving embody the ideals of self-government that all nations strive to achieve. Lincoln’s distinctively humane personality and incredible impact on the nation have endowed him with an enduring legacy. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. Lincoln married Mary Todd on November 4, 1842, at her sister Elizabeth’s home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 23 years old and he was 33 years of age. They had four sons, all born in Springfield.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY  Fig¹.  Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Alexander Ramsey on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Vera Arsic on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking With The Beauty Of Loving Yourself And Others

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

―Cindy Crawford

What a powerful distinction. Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model. She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

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Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

couple hugging on high ground overlooking the sea

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others.

We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick With The Beauty Of loving Yourself And Others,

Pamela

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Celebs Journey on flickr  Fig². Photo by Duy Pham on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Chermiti Mohamed on Unsplash  Citation: ¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If Only You Try” – Dr. Seuss

 

“Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh, the things you can think up if only you try.”

 – Dr. Seuss

 

There’s never a point of giving up. As Dr. Seuss says, there are so many things you can think up— if you only try.

 

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Did you know that more 2,500 thoughts go through your head every hour?¹ Did you know that more than 60,000 ideas run through your mind on a single day? That means you’re filled with right ideas; right creativity; and new pathways.

 

Sweethearts Dream Big box

 

You can’t be stuck in a job, feel there’s no way out of a relationship, feel blocked in a relationship, feel stuck in a partnership, or stuck in anything! You don’t have to feel trapped in a job, trapped in a salary range, or concerned about tomorrow. You don’t even have to have faith in a larger being or universe, even Dr. Seuss encourages us to think, to try! And with that, we will find our way.

I’m Finding My Way With You,

Pamela


Theodor Seuss Geisel(1904-1991), better known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, was a writer and cartoonist who published over 60 books. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, under the name of Dr. Seuss in 1937. Dr. Seuss won numerous awards for his work, including the 1984 Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, three Emmys and three Grammys.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts. His father, Theodor Robert Geisel, was a successful brewmaster; his mother was Henrietta Seuss Geisel. At age 18, Geisel left home to attend Dartmouth College, where he became the editor in chief of its humor magazine, Jack-O-Lantern. When Geisel and his friends were caught drinking in his dorm room one night, in violation of Prohibition law, he was kicked off the magazine staff, but continued to contribute to it using the pseudonym “Seuss.” After graduating from Dartmouth, Geisel attended the University of Oxford in England, with plans to eventually become a professor. While studying at Oxford, Dr. Seuss met his future wife, Helen Palmer. The couple married in 1927 and moved back to the United States the same year. Dr. Seuss never had any children of his own.

Citations: ¹ Sasson, Remez, “How Many Thoughts Does Your Mind Think in One Hour?”, Success Consciousness, https://www.successconsciousness.com/blog/inner-peace/how-many-thoughts-does-your-mind-think-in-one-hour/

Biosource: BIOGRAPHY,  Fig. ¹: Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash,  Fig. ²: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash