Tag Archives: community

The Classic Pamela Positive: Divide and Rule…Unite and Lead

He was brilliant, insightful and troubled at times, too… but this is a great quote from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

“Divide and rule, a sound motto; unite and lead, a better one.”

 

It’s sad sometimes how, per Goethe’s quote above, we at times need to separate into distinct groups in order to have harmony…but in a close future, the habit will be one of uniting…and so a better you, me, all of us.

 

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at A Stranger, and The Important Reason Why” – Juliana Margulies

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

— Juliana Margulies

 

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I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 

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Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosophy and Madison Avenue advertising executive. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one young son together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Love Is

 

What Love Is

 

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It’s the warmth of your eyes.

It’s the feeling in your heart.

It’s the slowing down to care.

 

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It’s connecting.

 

It’s giving.

 

And you can do it right now. Go reach out to someone and give them your love.

 

Love Today,

 

Pamela

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Roman Kraft on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Ryan Holloway on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Spending Time with People You Love and Who Love You”

“It is only a slight exaggeration to say that happiness is the experience of spending time with people you love and who love you.”

 –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Laureate

 

Gifts and giving.  We associate so much of that with happiness.  Yet our one true Happiness is Loving Others. 

 

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Oh, that sweet presence to just be around those we cherish and feel at home with!

Daniel Kahneman is an Israeli-American psychologist and Nobel laureate.  He is known for his work in the psychology of decision-making.  He was born in Tel Aviv, spent his childhood in France, and moved to Israel in the late 1940s.  He studied psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and began his career as a lecturer there.  Kahneman has published extensively in psychology, and received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 2002 for his work on prospect theory.  He is currently on the faculty at Princeton.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Selfless Person Is More Concerned About the Happiness of Another…”

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“A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes. A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. ”

–H. Burke Peterson

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H. Burke Peterson was an authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the author of “A Glimpse of Glory”.  In World War II, he fought with the American Navy in the Pacific theatre.  After the war, he attended the University of Arizona and went on to receive his masters at the Utah State Agricultural College. He was married to Brookie Carden in 1947, and they had five daughters.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

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“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”
–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

Terri has it right. What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important we keep doing so. At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so… however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth. So we must honor them, honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

As far as paddling one’s own canoe. As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.” She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together. We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there. She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special. She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

 

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Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

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Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.