Tag Archives: community

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” -Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

―Russell Conwell

 

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It’s that simple.

Give Something Today,

Pamela

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Nathan Lemon on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Build Your Global Business by Listening

 

So you are building a business. That’s wonderful!

One of the most important things we can do when we build, is to Listen. Listening helps us understand what our clients need. It tells us what we can produce that is of value. And it shows that we care.

This is even more important when we are working with people all over the world. When getting involved internationally, it’s even more important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community. To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world. You will then build the best product, and build the best team, for the world. 

 

People Having Meeting

 

In addition, Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And, you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

Of course, this opens your business up to new opportunities.

So it’s not just another day at work today. Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about doing so each moment. Then, it’s not work, but meaningful communication, a meaningful product, a meaningful team, a meaningful life, moment by moment.  Listen to attain your business bliss!

 

Woman Sitting on Gray Chair

 

Listening Is Living,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

Fig².  Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

man wearing knit cap on grey background

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website


Citations:

1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fig¹.  Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Be Too Large For Worry… Part Ten of Ten

 

This is Part Ten of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.  Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

 

Promise Yourself

To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear, and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.

—Christian D. Larson

 

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

albino tiger

 

 

Here’s your tenth one, below.  I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books.  He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s.  He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz.  He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.  Photo by Catherine Bares on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Give So Much Time… Part Nine of Ten

 

This is Part Nine of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.  Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

 

Promise Yourself

To give so much time to the improvement of yourself that you have no time to criticize others.

—Christian D. Larson

 

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

silhouette photography of woman stretching front of sea

 

 

Here’s your ninth one, below.  I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Stay tuned for Part Ten of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books.  He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s.  He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz.  He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918.  They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924).  The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Wear A Cheerful… Part Eight of Ten

 

This is Part Eight of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

 

Promise Yourself

To wear a cheerful countenance at all times and give every living creature you meet a smile.

-Christian D. Larson

 

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

smiling boy

 

 

Here’s your eighth one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Stay tuned for Part Nine of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by kazuend on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Forget The Mistakes… Part Seven of Ten

 

This is Part Seven of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

 

Promise Yourself

To forget the mistakes of the past and press on to the greater achievements of the future.

—Christian D. Larson

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

person standing in front of mountain landscape photography

 

 

Here’s your seventh one, below. I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

Stay tuned for Part Eight of the Ten Part Series “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself ” tomorrow!

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books. He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s. He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz. He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by Nicolas Cool on Unsplash