Tag Archives: UniversalGiving

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I love That… In The Toughest Moments…He Never…Gets Distracted By The Chatter…He Just Keeps…Moving Forward” -Michelle Obama

 

“And I love that even in the toughest moments, when we’re all sweating it – when we’re worried that the bill won’t pass, and it seems like all is lost – Barack never lets himself get distracted by the chatter and the noise. Just like his grandmother, he just keeps getting up and moving forward… with patience and wisdom, and courage and grace.”

— Michelle Obama

 

   

You may face distraction.

 

 

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But your job is to remain calm and focused on the task at hand.

 

 

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That’s called character and grace, and we are called to it every day.

Believing you can be your best,

Pamela

 

 


Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States and wife of U.S. President Barack Obama, was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois. By the sixth grade, Michelle was taking classes in her school’s gifted program. She went on to attend Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the city’s first magnet high school for gifted children, where, among other activities, she served as the student government treasurer. She attended Princeton University, graduating cum laude in 1985, and went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1988.

After law school, Michelle worked as an associate in the Chicago branch of the firm Sidley Austin, in the area of marketing and intellectual property. It was there, in 1989, that she met her future husband, Barack Obama, a summer intern to whom she was assigned as an adviser. After two years of dating, Barack proposed, and the couple married on October 3, 1992. Their daughters, Malia and Sasha, were born in 1998 and 2001, respectively. On November 6, 2012, Barack Obama was reelected for a second term as U.S. president. After Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Michelle Obama accompanied her husband with their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, onto the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago, where President Obama delivered his victory speech. As first lady, she focused her attention on current social issues, such as poverty, healthy living and education.


Citations:

Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

Fig. 2: Photo by Frank Mckenna on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

 

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

 

 


Citations:

Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What’s Important to You Is Important to Me”

 

 

“What’s Important To You Is Important To Me”

 

 

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This is one of my favorite statements.  It helps me understand and sincerely care about others.  When we truly listen to our family, friends, partners, team mates, improv players, then we can really hear…what’s important.

 

Sometimes it might be a clean kitchen.  For others, it might be taking the dog for a walk or getting the car cleaned.  Or it might be that you showed up at your daughter’s gymnastics recital. And sometimes, sitting down and listening to your boyfriend, while not multitasking and cleaning the dishes at the same time, may be the biggest sign of attention. It can even be as small as keeping your desk clean at work because you know it inspires your manager.

 

 

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The point is, we all fall into habits.  These habits are what are most comfortable, and convenient, for us.  They are our priorities. But they are not necessarily important to others.  Instead, we need to take a look at what motivates others.

 

So even if we can live with a messy desk, if we know the manager is inspired to see an ordered workspace, then we can try to rise to that new standard.  If it bothers our companion that we’re doing something else while he’s talking about a serious issue, then we need to stop and sit down, and give our undivided attention.  If it makes a difference to our mom that we check the stove one more time before we leave the kitchen, then we make her feel cared for, and can do it again.

 

 

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These are the small and important ways that we can let someone know they are important to us.

 

It’s the Substance of what builds or breaks down any relationship.

 

Many of us have felt that overwhelmingly warm feeling when someone does something for us… It specifically hits our hearts.  “Ah…how grateful I am that they took out the recycling!  I love an ordered home…” It’s something that puts you at peace. And that positive energy allows you to give more.

 

 

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“What’s Important to You is Important to Me.”

 

What a beautiful way to live…

 

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Aman Shrivastava on Unsplash

Fig². Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

Fig³. Michael Browning on Unsplash

Fig⁴. Jamez Picard on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

 

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Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

 

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For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

 

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Bobby Burch on Unsplash

Fig². Erik Dungan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

 

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is one of our most renowned writers, philosophers, and literary creators. He came from a wealthy family; he didn’t need to do a lot if he didn’t want to.  But he used his skills to create literature that made us think.  Additionally, top leaders of the day came to him to hear his thoughts, which were profound and inspirational. So not only did he create excellent works of literary art, but he also engaged world leaders with his deep thinking. They became better people, because of him. They sought him out for his thoughts.

 

We can learn from Goethe. The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D.

 

 

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and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities.

 

But you might also simply smile peacefully

 

 

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and joyously to all that come your way.

 

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Tim Gouw on Unsplush

Fig². Jamie Brown on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “There is a whole vista out there I didn’t anticipate.” – Jane Fonda

 

 

Jane Fonda was once asked what she learned, through a multi-talented, 60+ year career what she learned about handling the peaks and the valleys…. Here is what she had to say.

 

“Embrace it all. And it doesn’t have to peak and then be all downhill. I am over the hill in a chronological sense, but there is a whole vista out there that I didn’t anticipate. So you can reach the peak and then you can go down and it can be just as interesting. It’s a good idea not to pay too much attention to what other people think are the peaks and valleys.”

—Jane Fonda

 

 

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How we should be encouraged to see the vistas!

You’re not going down, you are just being grateful for the new vista, the next new vista. Stay looking up and onwards.

 

I’m Keeping Vista Views for us All,

Pamela

 

 


Jane Seymour Fonda (born December 21, 1937)is an American actress, writer, producer, political activist, fitness guru, and former fashion model. She is the recipient of various accolades including two Academy Awards, two BAFTA Awards, four Golden Globe Awards, a Primetime Emmy Award, the AFI Life Achievement Award, and the Honorary Golden Lion. In addition to her acting, Fonda became an outspoken critic of the Vietnam War. She traveled to North Vietnam in 1972 — a visit that caused an uproar back at home. Fonda also fought for social causes, serving as a spokesperson on issues of civil rights and women’s rights.

She was born in New York City on December 21, 1937. Her parents were Canadian-born socialite Frances Ford Brokaw (née Seymour; 1908–1950), and actor Henry Fonda (1905–1982). According to her father, their surname came from an Italian ancestor who immigrated to the Netherlands in the 1500s. She has a brother, Peter, who is also an actor, and a maternal half-sister, Frances de Villers Brokaw (aka “Pan”), whose daughter is Pilar Corrias, the owner of the Pilar Corrias Gallery in London.  Fonda has been married three times — all of these unions ended in divorce. The daughter of acclaimed actor Henry Fonda, the actress has won two Oscars.

BioSource: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY


Citation:

Fig¹: Brad Barmore on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “If Only You Try” – Dr. Seuss

 

 

“Think Left And Think Right And Think Low And Think High.  Oh, The Things You Can Think Up If Only You Try”

 – Dr. Seuss

 

 

There’s never a point of giving up. As Dr. Seuss says, there’s so many things you can think up— if you only try.

 

 

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Did you know that more 2,500 thoughts go through your head every hour?¹ Did you know that more than 60,000 ideas run through your mind on a single day? That means you’re filled with right ideas; right creativity; and new pathways.

 

 

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You can’t be stuck in a job, feel there’s no way out of a relationship, feel blocked in a relationship, feel stuck in a partnership, or stuck in anything!   You don’t have to feel trapped in a job, trapped in a salary range, or concerned about tomorrow. You don’t even have to have faith in a larger being or universe, even Dr. Seuss encourages us to think, to try! And with that, we will find our way.

 

I’m Finding My Way With You,

Pamela

 

 


Theodor Seuss Geisel(1904-1991), better known by his pen name Dr. Seuss, was a writer and cartoonist who published over 60 books. He published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, under the name of Dr. Seuss in 1937. Dr. Seuss won numerous awards for his work, including the 1984 Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, three Emmys and three Grammys.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born on March 2, 1904, in Springfield, Massachusetts. His father, Theodor  Robert Geisel, was a successful brewmaster; his mother was Henrietta Seuss Geisel. At age 18, Geisel left home to attend Dartmouth College, where he became the editor in chief of its humor magazine, Jack-O-Lantern. When Geisel and his friends were caught drinking in his dorm room one night, in violation of Prohibition law, he was kicked off the magazine staff, but continued to contribute to it using the pseudonym “Seuss.” After graduating from Dartmouth, Geisel attended the University of Oxford in England, with plans to eventually become a professor. While studying at Oxford, Dr. Seuss met his future wife, Helen Palmer. The couple married in 1927 and moved back to the United States the same year. Dr. Seuss never had any children of his own.

Biosource: BIOGRAPHY


Citations:

¹ Sasson, Remez, “How Many Thoughts Does Your Mind Think in One Hour?”, Success Consciousness, https://www.successconsciousness.com/blog/inner-peace/how-many-thoughts-does-your-mind-think-in-one-hour/

Fig. ¹: Photo by Thought Catalog on Unsplash

Fig. ²: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash