Tag Archives: Fast Company

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking With The Beauty Of Loving Yourself And Others

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

―Cindy Crawford

What a powerful distinction. Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model. She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

34452665203_6fb185be25_o.jpg

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

couple hugging on high ground overlooking the sea

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others.

We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick With The Beauty Of loving Yourself And Others,

Pamela

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Celebs Journey on flickr  Fig². Photo by Duy Pham on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Chermiti Mohamed on Unsplash  Citation: ¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

―Cindy Crawford

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others,

Pamela


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies. Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash  Citation: ¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

 

In this article¹ by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

 

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

people holding shoulders sitting on wall

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

 

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

 

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

 

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s.  She has also been involved in fitness campaigns and appeared in TV and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings.

She married businessman and former model Rande Gerber on May 29, 1998. They have two children, son Presley Walker Gerber (born July 2, 1999) and daughter Kaia Jordan Gerber (born September 3, 2001). Both of her children went into modeling.

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

¹ Alicia Morga “20 Things I’ve Learned as an Entrepreneur”, June 30, 2010, Fast Company https://www.fastcompany.com/1665596/20-things-ive-learned-entrepreneur#

Fig¹. Duy Pham on Unsplash

Starting the New Year? Don’t Miss These Tips in Working with Your CEO

addtext_com_MTIxMTIwODQxMgFast Company: How to Work With a CEO

CEOs have to run a company. As such they have pressure to meet financial goals, build a strong team, and advance their products, often all over the world. If you are working for a CEO, I’ve provided some helpful tips about what can build a great relationship. I hope you enjoy.

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What Do Successful People Do Each Day?

What Successful People Do with the First Hour of Their Work Day” by Kevin Purdy

This is a good article on Fast Company about what we focus on, and here’s my response as well. Let me know what you do so I can learn from your best practice, too!

Sincerely,
Pamela

Pamela’s Response:

It’s so important each day to start with spiritual centeredness. I study my faith and others to keep me peaceful and purposeful, for each day.

As CEO, you have many decisions and many interactions. It’s not just which decisions, but how we handle them…with positivity and presence. It will determine how many frogs we eat, too — that lens of viewing it as a service and helpful, rather than a burden. We can make our tough activities more like meeting princes and princesses if we realize there is a good lesson to be learned, and, we can bring value to the situation for a stronger good or outcome.

What Do You Talk About At a Cocktail Party? Top Recommendation: Take the European View

I recently saw this article on Fast Company, where I also blog, about top conversation starters — and I would say “keepers,” too. Celebrate the full person!

Hate Small Talk? These 5 Questions Will Help You Work Any Room” by Allison Graham

Here was my response:

Dear Allison,

What wonderful ideas! One way I look at it is to take a European View: Instead of talking about work, ask about what people are interested in. Often work for people is simply a job.

In America, we often use work as a “go-to” in our conversations. That’s not bad, as many of us are passionate about our work, or have been fortunate to find a calling.

Yet Europeans take a different view. They often enjoy life through a broader perspective: art, food, intellect, spending time together. Work is one component of life.

So instead I ask what people are interested in, what they love to do. People love to talk about this, and it may or may not involve work. They also appreciate being asked about themselves holistically as people.

What If Innovation Is a Pleasant Shock?

A recent interview with Guy Kawasaki on Fast Company discussed influence, engagement, and innovation.  Guy spoke about the Influence Project, Fast Company’s current contest to find the most Influential Person Online.  When asked if what he was doing was gaining traction, and his response to negative reactions, Guy said, “If you’re not pissing people off, you’re not doing anything interesting…You enchant people more by being blunt and honest than trying to ameliorate everybody.”

This raised some thoughts for me about innovation that I shared with Guy, and would love to share with you.

***   ***   ***   ***

Dear Guy,

As always, I love your innovation.  I agree with your commitment to push the mark.  But maybe we don’t have to upset the balance for people; sometimes, it can simply be an “ah-hah” moment, a moment of surprise, a twist in new thinking for someone, a way we have improved their lives.

For example, we try to push the mark with employees by doing something innovative.  We’re age agnostic.  Sometimes 18 year olds end up leading our team meetings.  And they are quite good at it.

We want to honor our team wholistically. So people are free to continuously share their outside goals and we will do what we can to help them. One woman was into motorbikes. Another guy wants to work in space and at NASA.  Another woman likes honoring her cat who drinks out of a faucet — and won’t drink water any other way.  So we express interest from the largest to the smallest details. What’s important to them? And we strive to respond. We tailor information, help, provide education, give introductions, shoot them referrals, pull out articles, and think longterm about how we can help them with their goals.

What if innovation is a pleasant shock?

Warm Regards, Pamela