Tag Archives: Life Lessons

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” —Will Rogers

 

“Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.”

-Will Rogers

 

 

 

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This is great advice — and a tough one. Strive for excellence — then let go.  Excel, but relax. Be a go-getter, but laugh. One can think it is confusing!

Yet even the greatest Olympic ice skater, the president of the U.N., and your awesome mom need “a break from excellence.” Just a little time to breathe, reflect, enjoy life, live.

 

 

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Why? Because then they can go back to excellence. They’ve rejuvenated, recharged, and “re-become” themselves. Did you know that 53% of people in the U.S. are considered “burnout”?  And 48% percent in San Francisco and 52% percent in New York. What is burnout? It is a state of physical, emotional, and/or emotional exhaustion experienced at work.

 

 

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So let the superstar in your life go for it and let go. They deserve it. And so do you!

 

 

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William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. Rogers grew up in a ranching family. In 1905, Rogers began performing a lasso act on the vaudeville circuit. His charm and humor, along with his technical ability, made Rogers a star. Audiences responded with enthusiasm to his off-the-cuff remarks delivered while performing elaborate roping tricks. Rogers parlayed his vaudeville success into a Broadway career. He debuted in New York in 1916, performing in The Wall Street Girl. This led to many more theatrical roles, including headlining appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies. In addition to acting, Rogers became nationally known as a writer. He penned a column for the Saturday Evening Post in newspapers. His columns dealt with contemporary issues from a perspective of small town morality, emphasizing the integrity of working people.

Rogers’s fame had eclipsed his country bumpkin persona by 1930. No longer believable as an uneducated outsider, he was able to voice his characteristic wit and wisdom while playing a professional. Legendary director John Ford worked with Rogers on three of these later films—Doctor Bull, Judge Priest and The Steamboat Round the Bend. On August 15, 1935, the plane carrying Will Rogers crashed in Point Barrow, Alaska. He died on impact. Millions across the country mourned the sudden silencing of a quintessentially American voice.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” – Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

– Russell Conwell

 

 

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It’s that simple.

Give something today,
Pamela

 

 


 

 

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Increases Happiness

 

Money increases happiness, according to Harvard University

But only when it is lifting people out of extreme poverty.  

 

 

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It essentially comes down to Maslow’s basic needs.  

If money can help you attain shelter, food and clothing — which eventually lifts you into the middle class –  then it does bring you happiness.

But little after that.

Once those basic needs are taken care of, we must go to higher needs for happiness.  Caring for people. Caring for ourselves. Doing the right thing. Living a simpler life.

According to Stephen G. Post, Director of Compassionate Care at Stony Brook University in New York, happiness was on a higher level during the Great Depression than it was at the turn of this century.  He attributes much of this to a simpler lifestyle.

Live simply; be happy.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 “What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

 

– Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

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Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D. and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities. But you might also simply smile peacefully and joyously to all that come your way.

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.  

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Big Lesson In Life, Baby, Is Never Be Scared Of Anyone Or Anything.” – Frank Sinatra

 

“The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.”

– Frank Sinatra

 

 

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Many of us wish we could say that. 🙂  If we are trusting and calm in our thoughts, then we truly cannot be scared of anyone, or anything.

 


 

Frank Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and film actor. Beginning his musical career in the swing era as a boy singer with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra found unprecedented success as a solo artist from the early to mid-1940s after being signed by Columbia Records in 1943 and released his first album The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946.  He later signed with Capitol Records in 1953 until he left Capitol in 1961 to find his own record label Reprise Records.  Among the albums he released are Come Fly with Me, Nice ‘n’ Easy, and Sinatra at the Sands.  His film credits include From Here to Eternity (won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), The Man with the Golden Arm (nominated for the Best Actor Oscar), The Manchurian Candidate, Guys and Dolls, and High Society.  Sinatra had three children, Nancy, Frank Jr., and Tina, all with his first wife, Nancy Sinatra (née Barbato) (m. 1939–1951). He was married three more times, to actresses Ava Gardner (m. 1951–1957), Mia Farrow (m. 1966–1968) and finally to Barbara Marx (m. 1976–1998; his death).

Bio source: Wikipedia: Frank Sinatra

Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings

The Classic Pamela Positive: Why Certain People Are In Your Life

These words have been inspiring to me, and I am glad to share them with you.

People come into your life for a reason, a season or a lifetime. When you figure out which it is, you know exactly what to do.

 

 

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When someone is in your life for a REASON, it is usually to meet a need you have expressed outwardly or inwardly.  They have come to assist you through a difficulty, to provide you with guidance and support, to aid you physically, emotionally or spiritually.  They may seem like a godsend, and they are. They are there for the reason you need them to be.

 

 

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Then, without any wrongdoing on your part or at an inconvenient time, this person will say or do something to bring the relationship to an end. Sometimes they die. Sometimes they walk away. Sometimes they act up or out and force you to take a stand. What we must realize is that our need has been met, our desire fulfilled; their work is done. The prayer you sent up has been answered and it is now time to move on.

When people come into your life for a SEASON, it is because your turn has come to share, grow or learn. They may bring you an experience of peace or make you laugh.  They may teach you something you have never done. They usually give you an unbelievable amount of joy. Believe it! It is real! But, only for a season.

 

 

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LIFETIME relationships teach you lifetime lessons; those things you must build upon in order to have a solid emotional foundation. Your job is to accept the lesson, love the person (any way); and put what you have learned to use in all other relationships and areas of your life. It is said that love is blind, but friendship is clairvoyant.

Author Unknown

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Tough Times Never Last, But Tough People Do.” – Dr. Robert Schuller

 

“Tough times never last, but tough people do.”

– Dr. Robert Schuller

 

And the point here is not be tough… but to persevere. To last through the valley. To endure, cultivate patience, and live humility. With that, we develop our character which allows us to serve our world and neighbors more effectively.

 

 

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So we encourage you to last. Sometimes the road might seem long, but look at that beautiful, eternal sunshine. Keep reaching for it.

 

Sunshine Ahead,

Pamela

 


 

 

Dr. Robert Schuller was a minister and founder of the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, California. He was born in Alton, Iowa and he was the youngest of five children. His grandparents were both Dutch immigrants, and he was part of a tight-knit Dutch community. After he graduated high school, Dr. Schuller attended Hope College and then received his Master of Divinity degree from Western Theological Seminary. In 1950, he married Arvella De Haan, who would help shape the music of Crystal Cathedral. Together they had five children. He wrote over thirty books and six of those books became New York Times bestsellers. He was best known for starting the popular TV program Hour of Power; as a result he became a popular Televangelist. After retiring as the principle pastor of the Crystal Cathedral, he became the chairman of the church’s board of directors.