Tag Archives: Life Lessons

The Classic Pamela Positive: Letting It All Go, Each Day – Le Don

 

 

Mentally, I sometimes Let It All Go, Each Day. I literally picture myself moving, and it impels action! You realize as your day unfolds how many things you have which you feel iffy about, or just ok. And that’s when they go in the give away bag.

 

 

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I actually have a giveaway bag now that has its own shelf with the label “Le Don.” That’s French for “The Gift.” So almost every week, I am giving something away, which I hope will be considered a gift eagerly used and appreciated by someone else.

I have found Letting It All Go helps others, and helps my home and heart become simpler, clearer…

It’s a gift in every sense of the word.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?
 
Have faith, then take another step. 

 

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That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!
 
Love,
 
Pamela 
 
 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash

“Records Are All Meant To Be Broken. I’m Just Happy It’s My Teammate And Nobody Else. And That I Got To Witness It In Person”- Steph Curry

 

Did someone break your record? Did someone ascend higher than you?

 

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… Were you able to celebrate it? Were you able to cheer them on?

“Records are all meant to be broken. I’m just happy it’s my teammate and nobody else. And that I got to witness it in person.”

What a model of a great leader who knows that doing the right thing, achieving our best, and cheering others on to do the right thing and achieve their best is the only way to go.

 

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In this case, Klay Thompson, one of the star players of basketball’s Golden State Warriors has just broken the record for 3-pointers that Steph had broken in 2016 with 13 3-pointers. Klay had broken it to achieve 14 3-pointers in 2018. 

Are you able to cheer on your teammate when they achieve their best? Even if it’s better than yours? Be it that your teammate is a fellow coworker, your husband, your wife, your cousin, your sister, your brother, your neighbor, your former intern (who you used to coach) … we get the picture. No matter who it is, it’s our job to celebrate achievement and to cheer people on. And if we’re really good, we’ll be like Steph Curry when he says,

 

“…And I got to witness it in person.”

 

He was fully present to cheer on his teammate, Klay Thompson, as he broke his record. Then, they both achieved a record in doing their best and, in kindness.

If you want to build peace and harmony in the sports realm, you can give to Nepal Orphans Home today.  They support the welfare of children in Nepal who are orphaned or abandoned by providing opportunities and supplies so that the children can partake in sports. You can support achievement in sports for deserving people all over the world.

Recognizing Others,

Pamela

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo Retrieved from Mercury News

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

 

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We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

 

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Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

Singing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

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The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

 

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving™. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me–and for my organization.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Obtaining the Things We Crave Most– Give

 

“There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.”

– Peyton March

 

 

Life is Sharing

 

Dear LIving and Giving readers, 

Give it someone else.  Have Encouragement? Give it, say it.  Have some Freedom? Empower someone else. Want to see more Peace in the World?  Be a peaceful kind person.

You can Give it Today!  I’ll join you, too.

Pamela


 

 

Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom. Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.

March was the son of Francis Andrew March, considered the principal founder of modern comparative linguistics in Anglo-Saxon and one of the first professors to advocate and teach English in colleges and universities. Peyton March attended Lafayette College, where his father occupied the first chair of English language and comparative philology in the United States. In 1884, he was appointed to West Point and graduated in 1888. He was assigned to the 3rd Artillery. As a student, he was a brother of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity (Rho chapter). He married Josephine Smith Cunningham (d. 1904) in 1891. They had a son, Peyton, Jr. (b. 1896), who was killed in a plane crash in Texas during World War I. March AFB in Riverside, California was named in young March’s honor.

Biosource: Wikipedia, Geni

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Fight, You Try Your Best, But If You Lose, You Don’t Have To Break Five Racquets.” – Rafael Nadal

 

“You fight, you try your best, but if you lose, you don’t have to break five racquets and smash up the locker room. You can do those things, but when you’re finished, nothing’s changed. You’ve still lost. If something positive came from that, I probably would do it. But I see only negativity.”

– Rafael Nadal

 

 

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What an outstanding leadership statement. We all have times that something challenging happens. Do you tear around, pull your hair out, snap at someone?

What will you do? Spend your anger until you are tired. It’s all about you and you expressing anger.

 

 

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Turn away to a calmer state, one that benefits all. Remember, you are a leader to others. Everyone is.

 

Everyone is a leader to someone, simply by our daily actions. So if that business partnership doesn’t come through, do you slam the door? Or do you sit down calm with your team, thank them for their efforts, and discuss lessons learned? If you didn’t win the election, do you set the stage on fire? Or do you rally the troupes and thank them for all their efforts and have a come-together-let’s-appreciate-all-our-work-together dinner?

 

Losing is an attitude. Not an action.

There actually is no loss. That’s in your mind.

So take the lessons learned, and have a winning mind.

 

 

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Even if you didn’t win, you still won knowledge. You learned how to do something better! Share that with yourself and the team. Celebrate that next victory for you know you are going out on court to do better the next time!

 

Smashing rackets wastes time. It deletes reflection. It’s no model for others up and coming in the world.

 

Hold your head high humbly proud about your effort. You did your best.   Then, listen, learn and keep going higher!

No smashing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Rafael Nadal was born in Mallorca, Spain, on June 3, 1986. When he was 3 years old, his uncle, Toni Nadal, a former professional tennis player, started working with him, seeing an aptitude for the sport in young Rafael. At the age of 8, Nadal won an under-12 regional tennis championship, giving Uncle Toni the incentive to step up his training. When Nadalwas just 12 years old, he won the Spanish and European tennis titles in his age group. He turned professional at age 15. At the age of 19, in 2005, Nadal won the French Open the first time he competed in the tournament, and his world ranking shot to No. 3. With his powerful topspin-heavy shots, speed and mental toughness, Nadal reigned as one of the “Big Four” of men’s tennis (along with Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray) for the next several years. In 2010, he was triumphant at the French Open and Wimbledon, and his subsequent win at the U.S. Open made him just the second men’s player to achieve the career Golden Slam—victories at all four majors, as well as Olympic gold.

 

The 2016 season, after suffering a first-round loss at the Australian Open in January, he rebounded to win titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona. However, Nadal’s attempts to play through a nagging wrist injury took its toll, and he was forced to pull out of his favorite tournament, the French Open, after two rounds. Nadal took part in Thailand’s “A Million Trees for the King” project, planting a tree in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on a visit to Hua Hin during his Thailand Open 2010.

 

Outside of tennis, Nadal is close with his parents and younger sister, María Isabel. He has a deep love for football and supports Real Madrid. In 2007, he founded Fundación RafaNadal to support young adults and children. Since then, he’s also created a tennis academy for disadvantaged children called “Anantapur Sports Village”.


Citations:
Fig. 1: Retrieved from Carine06 on Flickr
Fig. 2: Photo by Robert Salinas on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash