Tag Archives: caring

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or spiritual poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

 

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: The New Luxury – Water

 

In many emerging nations, children are starving and dying due to lack of clean water.  As a developednation, it certainly doesnt seem that advanced for us to be getting water for free when there appears to be a plenitude of it.  Meanwhile, two million people in the developing world are dying every year because they cant access clean water.

 

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Maybe we wont have water fountains in the future. Maybe that just doesnt make senseand people might be forced to buy bottled water, because it is a cherished, expensive and rare commodity. Quite soon, and even by certain nations, water already is the new diamond.  And the only challenge here is that diamonds are optional.  This high-end commodityis not something we can go without.

 

 

 

 

Its where our society is now realizing that the most expensive, prized and honored possessions in our world are things that we actually cannot possesswater must be used and reobtained and used again.  Unlike diamonds, it cant fit in our jewelry box, where we take it out whenever we so desire.  Its beauty rests in livelihood.

 

 

 

 

Further, its beauty rests in the continuation of life.

Our new luxuriesare now things that we must use to survive.  They are things that must be used frequently, and they must be sought out and obtained on a daily basis.  Our new luxury is about survival.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make of Your Life an Affirmation”

 

“Make of your life an affirmation, defined by your ideals, not the negation of others. Dare to the level of your capability then go beyond to a higher level.”

– Alexander Haig

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Alexander Haig was a four-star general in the United States Army, as well as Chief of Staff under President Nixon and President Ford, and Secretary of State under President Reagan. He grew up as the middle child in a Catholic family in Pennsylvania. Haig would attend the University of Notre Dame for a couple years before finishing at West Point Academy. He would later also receive an MBA from Columbia Business School and a MA in International Relations from Georgetown University. A veteran of the Korean War and Vietnam War, Haig received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star with oak leaf cluster, and the Purple Heart. He was married Patricia Fox and they had three children together.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Undertake Something So Great You Cannot Accomplish It Unaided

“We never become truly spiritual by sitting and wishing to become so. You must undertake something so great that you cannot accomplish it unaided.”

 

  – Phillips Brooks

 

Phillips Brooks, an educator and spiritual leader, advised us to push ourselves into the unknown for a special reason:

To become spiritual.

Well, you might ask, “Why is being spiritual so important? I simply want to create a great company, write a book, or scale Mount Kilimanjaro.”

The qualities it takes to do any of the above, and anything miraculous, are unseeable.

They are:

Perseverance: Don’t ever think of giving up…
Thoughtfulness and care in building a team…
Inspirational, being able to paint your vision in a way that excites others, impels them to take action…

You must have these qualities to build successful relationships and enduring companies.  Yet all of these are qualities which are not required in school, home or job.  And yet they are the invisible glue which will allow you “…to undertake something so great you cannot accomplish it unaided.”

They are not material or physical. They are spiritual.

 

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Phillips Brooks was an American clergyman in the Episcopal church during the 19th century. Before he joined the clergy, Brooks attended Harvard College and graduated at the age of 20. He moved on to become a schoolteacher, where he would be fired soon after. This led him to study in the Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia. He published several books of lectures and sermons, as well as authoring the popular Christmas carol, “O Little Town of Bethlehem.” During the American Civil War, he supported the North and denounced slavery.  He was highly regarded as a preacher and a patriot.

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Mahatma Gandhi Teaches Us: To Be…Love and Change, Start with You Now

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

– Mahatma Gandhi

 

The key word here from one of our greatest leaders is ‘be.’ Every day we have a chance to be. And the most important being is loving. Being kind, gracious, and helping others. That can start today. We can and should whisk away frustration, for every moment of frustration is one not spent on being the positive force we hope to be. What type of foundation are you building? One that crumbles from exhaustion and disbelief, cynicism? Or one of solidity, brick, by brick, with each brick contributing Principle, Love, Kindness, Grace, Strength, Truth, Joy…? As Gandhi says… the other key word here is ‘you.’ No one can do this for you. Not your partner, your parents, your best friend or your spouse.  You… are the being.

 

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Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.
Did you ever see a really great man?
Great in the best and truest sense?
If so, you could walk right up to him and say:
“How are you, Jim? “

 

-Russell Conwell, “Acres of Diamonds”

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.



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Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Before You Can Give Yourself Away, You Must Have a Self to Give.”

 

“Before you can give yourself away, you must have a self to give.”

Isabel Hickey

 

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Similar to George Gurdjieff’s commitment to self and spirit before serving others, Isabel Hickey realized that we must put ourselves first.  In so doing, we become strong and committed to giving ourselves the best, and then we can give our best selves unto others…

 

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Isabel Hickey was an American astrologer and writer who practiced Humanist Astrology with a psychological approach. If Evangeline Adams was the Mother of Astrology in the first half of the Twentieth Century, Isabel Hickey filled that role in the Sixties and the Seventies.  She wrote “Astrology, A Cosmic Science,” “It Is All Right” and “Minerva or Pluto, The Choice Is Yours.”