Tag Archives: life

“Records Are All Meant To Be Broken. I’m Just Happy It’s My Teammate And Nobody Else. And That I Got To Witness It In Person”- Steph Curry

 

Did someone break your record? Did someone ascend higher than you?

 

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… Were you able to celebrate it? Were you able to cheer them on?

“Records are all meant to be broken. I’m just happy it’s my teammate and nobody else. And that I got to witness it in person.”

What a model of a great leader who knows that doing the right thing, achieving our best, and cheering others on to do the right thing and achieve their best is the only way to go.

 

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In this case, Klay Thompson, one of the star players of basketball’s Golden State Warriors has just broken the record for 3-pointers that Steph had broken in 2016 with 13 3-pointers. Klay had broken it to achieve 14 3-pointers in 2018. 

Are you able to cheer on your teammate when they achieve their best? Even if it’s better than yours? Be it that your teammate is a fellow coworker, your husband, your wife, your cousin, your sister, your brother, your neighbor, your former intern (who you used to coach) … we get the picture. No matter who it is, it’s our job to celebrate achievement and to cheer people on. And if we’re really good, we’ll be like Steph Curry when he says,

 

“…And I got to witness it in person.”

 

He was fully present to cheer on his teammate, Klay Thompson, as he broke his record. Then, they both achieved a record in doing their best and, in kindness.

If you want to build peace and harmony in the sports realm, you can give to Nepal Orphans Home today.  They support the welfare of children in Nepal who are orphaned or abandoned by providing opportunities and supplies so that the children can partake in sports. You can support achievement in sports for deserving people all over the world.

Recognizing Others,

Pamela

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo Retrieved from Mercury News

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

–       Daniel Mendelsohn

 

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

 

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Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

 

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

 

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


 

 

Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Obtaining the Things We Crave Most– Give

 

“There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.”

– Peyton March

 

 

Life is Sharing

 

Dear LIving and Giving readers, 

Give it someone else.  Have Encouragement? Give it, say it.  Have some Freedom? Empower someone else. Want to see more Peace in the World?  Be a peaceful kind person.

You can Give it Today!  I’ll join you, too.

Pamela


 

 

Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom. Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.

March was the son of Francis Andrew March, considered the principal founder of modern comparative linguistics in Anglo-Saxon and one of the first professors to advocate and teach English in colleges and universities. Peyton March attended Lafayette College, where his father occupied the first chair of English language and comparative philology in the United States. In 1884, he was appointed to West Point and graduated in 1888. He was assigned to the 3rd Artillery. As a student, he was a brother of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity (Rho chapter). He married Josephine Smith Cunningham (d. 1904) in 1891. They had a son, Peyton, Jr. (b. 1896), who was killed in a plane crash in Texas during World War I. March AFB in Riverside, California was named in young March’s honor.

Biosource: Wikipedia, Geni

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…The Things People Really Want Are Love, Connection, And Purpose.” – Mallika Chopra

 

“…The things people really want are love, connection, and purpose.”

-Mallika Chopra

 

That is indeed true wealth. It’s our family, our faith in Life, and our driving motivation — what makes us want to be here on earth.

 

 

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First, love means we are all created to do something for others.   Whether it is our daughter, our dog, or the doorman — everyone needs kindness and love.

Then, we must dedicate ourselves to something positive and contributive, where our soul makes a difference.  That can be an organization, a person, or simply our commitment to a way of being.

 

 

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Love and Purpose.  A fine way to live, and, enough to work on for every moment!

Lovingly, Pamela

 

 


Mallika Chopra is the Founder & CEO of Intent.com, an online community where members can share their dreams and aspirations, and receive support from others.  She stated that “My intent is to connect with others by sharing and listening to each other’s stories.”  Mallika learned about the power of intention at a young age from her father, Deepak Chopra, who taught her and her family to ask for love, hope, purpose, passion, inspiration and so many other positive qualities in their lives every day. Mallika is mom to Tara and Leela and has written two books inspired by them — 100 Promises To My Baby and 100 Questions From My Child. Her prior experience includes launching MTV in India, Michael Jackson’s Heal The World Foundation, and working with various internet companies. Mallika holds a B.A. from Brown and an M.B.A. from Kellogg University. (Bio source: Intent.com: About Us)

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All”

 

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

 

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Death Is Nothing At All

by Henry Scott Holland

Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way

which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

 

 

 


 

 

Henry Scott Holland was the Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford and a canon of Christ Church, Oxford. He was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire to George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham and the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He went to Eton and studied under Master William Johnson Cory. For college, he would attend Balliol College, Oxford, where he would be influenced greatly by T.H. Green, a prominent English philosopher and political radical. After graduating Oxford, he  formed PESEK and the Christian Social Union. His sermon after King Edward VII passed, Death is nothing at all, brought him wide-spread prominence. In 1910, he was appointed to his role at Oxford, where he remained for the rest of his life.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What Dogs Teach Us

 

Here is a moving story I wanted to share. The author is unknown.

This involves a story of a young boy whose dog needed to be put to sleep. Here is a conversation that ensued with his family.

 

 

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“We sat together for a while after Belker’s (the dog’s) death, wondering aloud about the sad fact that animal lives are shorter than human lives. Shane, who had been listening quietly, piped up “I know why.”

 

 

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Startled, we all turned to him. What came out of his mouth next stunned me. I’d never heard a more comforting explanation. It has changed the way I try to live. He said, “People are born so that they can learn how to live a good life—like loving everybody all the time and being nice, right?”

The six-year-old continued, “Well, dogs already know how to do that, so they don’t have to stay as long.”

 

 

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Remember, if a dog was the teacher you would learn things like:

  • When loved ones come home, always run to greet them;
  • Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride;
  • Take naps;
  • Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy;
  • Stretch before rising;
  • Run, romp, and play daily;
  • Thrive on attention and let people touch you;
  • Avoid biting when a simple growl will do;
  • On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass;
  • On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree;
  • When you’re happy, dance around and wag your entire body;
  • Delight in the simple joy of a long walk;
  • Be loyal;
  • Never pretend to be something you’re not;
  • If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it;
  • When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You’ll See Spirit Operating Everywhere” —Dan Millman

 

“Like the flower, trusting Spirit working according to a higher will beyond the reach of your mind, you’ll see Spirit operating everywhere, in everyone and everything…

 

 

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…To trust the process of your life. The more you trust Spirit in this way, the more you will work with it directly as a living force in your life… unfolding, like a flower, toward the Light.” 

—Dan Millman

 

 

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Dan Millman is an American writer and speaker. He was born and raised in Los Angeles, California, where he had an extremely active childhood. He took part in modern dance, trampoline, and gymnastics. Millman attended University of California, Berkeley, where he would receive study psychology. He won the 1964 Trampoline World Championships in London, earned All-American honors and won an NCAA Championship in vaulting, and in 1966 he won the USGF championship in floor exercise. He won four Gold Medals in gymnastics at the 1966 Maccabiah Games. He would go on to coach gymnastics at Stanford University, before he began conducting motivational seminars and presenting keynote speeches. He’s married to Joy Millman and they have three adult children.