Tag Archives: dream

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away From The Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

photo-1500917832468-298fa6292e2b.jpeg

 

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

photo-1491236149350-54bdab98dc14.jpeg

 

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights. You inspire!

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Bobby Burch on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Erik Dungan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

chocolates

 

Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate! Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love. We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

Be Vulnerable, Grow, Love!

Pamela


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking. His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind. His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities. In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell. Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Man Was Never Intended to Become an Oyster” – Theodore Roosevelt

 

“Get action. Seize the moment. Man was never intended to become an oyster.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

 

Man Climbing on Gray Concrete Peak at Daytime

 

Theodore Roosevelt was a true action man. He tumbled down the rivers of Brazil in turbulent times in South America. He took a stand for civil rights when it was not popular to do so. He defied the odds in elections, time and time again. He was persecuted and persevered in so many realms, overcoming his fears. And, he became president!

We must be hearty of soul and heart, and achieve great things.

This is not just an historical figure. You can achieve greatness too!

Believing In Your Greatness,

Pamela

 


President Theodore Roosevelt Jr. is famous for his larger-than-life personality, adventurous lifestyle, and strong opinions. He was an avid outdoorsman all his life, fought in the Spanish American War, wrote books on history and naturalism, and made expeditions to Africa and South America. He was prominent in politics, holding a number of offices; he is still the youngest person to be President of the United States.  Though popularly known as “Teddy” (and the inspiration for “teddy bears”), Roosevelt actually disliked the nickname, considering it too informal. He married Alice Lee in 1880, with whom he had one child before she passed away. He would later marry Edith Carow and they would have five children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.Photo by Rodrigo on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

 

chocolates

 

 

Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate!  Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love.  We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

 

Be Vulnerable, Grow, Love!

 

Pamela

 


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking.  His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind.  His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities.  In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell.  Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

 

photo-1500917832468-298fa6292e2b.jpeg

 

 

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

 

photo-1491236149350-54bdab98dc14.jpeg

 

 

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

 

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Bobby Burch on Unsplash

Fig². Erik Dungan on Unsplash