Tag Archives: serenity

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” —Will Rogers

 

“Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.”

-Will Rogers

 

 

 

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This is great advice — and a tough one. Strive for excellence — then let go.  Excel, but relax. Be a go-getter, but laugh. One can think it is confusing!

Yet even the greatest Olympic ice skater, the president of the U.N., and your awesome mom need “a break from excellence.” Just a little time to breathe, reflect, enjoy life, live.

 

 

picnic.jpeg

 

 

Why? Because then they can go back to excellence. They’ve rejuvenated, recharged, and “re-become” themselves. Did you know that 53% of people in the U.S. are considered “burnout”?  And 48% percent in San Francisco and 52% percent in New York. What is burnout? It is a state of physical, emotional, and/or emotional exhaustion experienced at work.

 

 

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So let the superstar in your life go for it and let go. They deserve it. And so do you!

 

 

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William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. Rogers grew up in a ranching family. In 1905, Rogers began performing a lasso act on the vaudeville circuit. His charm and humor, along with his technical ability, made Rogers a star. Audiences responded with enthusiasm to his off-the-cuff remarks delivered while performing elaborate roping tricks. Rogers parlayed his vaudeville success into a Broadway career. He debuted in New York in 1916, performing in The Wall Street Girl. This led to many more theatrical roles, including headlining appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies. In addition to acting, Rogers became nationally known as a writer. He penned a column for the Saturday Evening Post in newspapers. His columns dealt with contemporary issues from a perspective of small town morality, emphasizing the integrity of working people.

Rogers’s fame had eclipsed his country bumpkin persona by 1930. No longer believable as an uneducated outsider, he was able to voice his characteristic wit and wisdom while playing a professional. Legendary director John Ford worked with Rogers on three of these later films—Doctor Bull, Judge Priest and The Steamboat Round the Bend. On August 15, 1935, the plane carrying Will Rogers crashed in Point Barrow, Alaska. He died on impact. Millions across the country mourned the sudden silencing of a quintessentially American voice.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make A Date With Your Favorite Book Tonight.” – Love, Dove

 

In Silicon Valley, we are go-go-go getters. We “go -get” after our businesses, our startup company, our new deal, our new everything. We are “on it!”

 

And yet… while that productivity is good, leadership and kind care taking of oneself takes time.

I’ll share. A couple years ago, I had a Duke Event (which I love) and a Stanford International Happy Hour, (which I also love). And yet, I needed to be quiet…

 

But my mind said…  

 

You should go!! You could meet more people that will help UniversalGiving! You should take this opportunity. If you don’t you will feel badly.

 

 

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And part of me, did.

 

I wrestled.

 

I finally made the decision:

 

To go home. 

 

And I read. And it was so peaceful, and life giving and regenerating, and kind. And I was filled. And I was ready the next day…

 

 

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If you’ve been going hard, why not let yourself go home tonight. You don’t need to network, make the next deal, meet a new person. If you are supposed to meet them, they will come back into your life in another way, if that is the right opportunity for the both of you.

 

Enjoy a Peaceful Night. I’m going to church… and then, I’m going to read. 🙂

Sincerely,
Pamela

 


 

Dove Chocolate, sold as Galaxy in other countries, is a Mars Company owned and operated brand of chocolate that is virtually in all supermarkets and convenience stores across the US. They are well known for their silky and smooth texture and are well liked. However, what makes each chocolate special is the addition of a quote inside each of their wrappers, which has attracted both praise and critique from many consumers.
Dove Chocolate messages like “Believe in yourself,” and “Make the most of everyday,” and others dealing with hope, mindfulness, and inspiration, bring positivity to the life of the reader. However, some people feel that sayings like “Too much of a good thing is still wonderful,” and “Do what feels right,” are misleading and may be giving people bad advice, and have been poking fun at the wrapper messages. You can take a look at photos of their wrappers by clicking here and you can read a compilation of their messages here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In Happy Moments…”

 

“In happy moments, praise God.  In the difficult moments, seek God.  In the quiet moments, trust God.  In every moment, thank God.”

 

– Anonymous

 

 

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The Classic Pamela Positive: Serenity, Courage and Wisdom

 

“God, grant me the serenity to accept the things that I cannot change; The courage to change the things I can; And the wisdom to know the difference.”

– Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr

 

Dr. Niebuhr’s quote is one of the most world renowned, for he paints to the fact that “everything you need is already inside,” and the importance of believing in oneself, balanced with a practical sense of what can be done.  We should encourage ourselves in areas in which we can truly make a change.  Of course the process of trying, especially if we love it, is important to our growth at times. At other times, we need to let go and focus on the positive mountain which is beckoning us to climb it.

 

 

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For the most part, it does come down to motives, too. If it is our past, you cannot change it.  Therefore his wisdom guides us.  Focus on the present, right now, right now, right now…in order to live fully and effect change as we speak…

 

*****

 

Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr was a theologian and orator.  He was an outspoken critic of poor industry conditions in factories.  He supported unions by letting organizers use his pulpit to advocate for workers rights.  He edited the magazine Christianity and Crisis for more than twenty years, and published a number of books and essays, including The Nature and Destiny of Man.  He was married to Ursula Keppel-Compton, a leading figure at Barnard College, who worked with Niebuhr on his writing.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

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We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

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Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

Singing,

Pamela

******

 

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The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

 

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I love That… In The Toughest Moments….He Never…Gets Distracted By The Chatter…He Just Keeps…Moving Forward” -Michelle Obama

 

“And I love that even in the toughest moments, when we’re all sweating it – when we’re worried that the bill won’t pass, and it seems like all is lost – Barack never lets himself get distracted by the chatter and the noise. Just like his grandmother, he just keeps getting up and moving forward… with patience and wisdom, and courage and grace.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      – Michelle Obama

 

You may face distraction.

 

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But your job is to remain calm and focused on the task at hand.

 

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That’s called character and grace, and we are called to it everyday.

Believing you can be your best,

Pamela

 

******

 

Michelle Obama, the 44th first lady of the United States and wife of U.S. President Barack Obama, was born on January 17, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois. By the sixth grade, Michelle was taking classes in her school’s gifted program. She went on to attend Whitney M. Young Magnet High School, the city’s first magnet high school for gifted children, where, among other activities, she served as the student government treasurer. She attended Princeton University, graduating cum laude in 1985, and went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1988.

After law school, Michelle worked as an associate in the Chicago branch of the firm Sidley Austin, in the area of marketing and intellectual property. It was there, in 1989, that she met her future husband, Barack Obama, a summer intern to whom she was assigned as an adviser. After two years of dating, Barack proposed, and the couple married on October 3, 1992. Their daughters, Malia and Sasha, were born in 1998 and 2001, respectively. On November 6, 2012, Barack Obama was reelected for a second term as U.S. president. After Mitt Romney conceded defeat, Michelle Obama accompanied her husband with their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, onto the stage at McCormick Place in Chicago, where President Obama delivered his victory speech. As first lady, she focused her attention on current social issues, such as poverty, healthy living and education.

 

Credits:
Fig. 1: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Frank Mckenna on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” —Will Rogers

 

“Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” -Will Rogers

 

viva la vie.jpeg

 

This is great advice — and a tough one. Strive for excellence — then let go.  Excel, but relax. Be a go-getter, but laugh. One can think it is confusing!

Yet even the greatest Olympic ice skater, the president of the U.N., and your awesome mom need “a break from excellence.” Just a little time to breathe, reflect, enjoy life, live.

 

picnic.jpeg

 

Why? Because then they can go back to excellence. They’ve rejuvenated, recharged, and “re-become” themselves. Did you know that 53% of people in the U.S. are considered “burnout”?  And 48% percent in San Francisco and 52% percent in New York. What is burnout? It is a state of physical, emotional, and/or emotional exhaustion experienced at work.

 

photo-1503945438517-f65904a52ce6.jpeg

 

So let the superstar in your life go for it and let go. They deserve it. And so do you!

 

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 1.53.39 PM

 

******

 

d412b34b61b7bb73c34a6831af9af83f.jpg

William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. Rogers grew up in a ranching family. In 1905, Rogers began performing a lasso act on the vaudeville circuit. His charm and humor, along with his technical ability, made Rogers a star. Audiences responded with enthusiasm to his off-the-cuff remarks delivered while performing elaborate roping tricks. Rogers parlayed his vaudeville success into a Broadway career. He debuted in New York in 1916, performing in The Wall Street Girl. This led to many more theatrical roles, including headlining appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies. In addition to acting, Rogers became nationally known as a writer. He penned a column for the Saturday Evening Post in newspapers. His columns dealt with contemporary issues from a perspective of small town morality, emphasizing the integrity of working people.

Rogers’s fame had eclipsed his country bumpkin persona by 1930. No longer believable as an uneducated outsider, he was able to voice his characteristic wit and wisdom while playing a professional. Legendary director John Ford worked with Rogers on three of these later films—Doctor Bull, Judge Priest and The Steamboat Round the Bend. On August 15, 1935, the plane carrying Will Rogers crashed in Point Barrow, Alaska. He died on impact. Millions across the country mourned the sudden silencing of a quintessentially American voice.