Author Archives: Pamela Hawley

About Pamela Hawley

Pamela is the founder and CEO of UniversalGiving™ (www.UniversalGiving.org). UniversalGiving™ (UG) is an award winning marketplace which allows people to give and volunteer with the top-performing projects all over the world. UniversalGiving™ offers a variety of ways for donors to become involved through individual Projects or Gift Packages. Visitors simply choose a region (such as Africa) and an issue (such as education or the environment) and receive a list of quality ways to give and volunteer. When giving, 100% of your donation goes directly to the project. UniversalGiving™ performs due diligence on all its projects through its unique, trademarked Quality Model™. To date, almost $1.5 million and 8,000 volunteers have been matched through www.UniversalGiving.org. UniversalGiving™ has most recently been featured in the Christian Science Monitor, Self Magazine, Chicago Sun Times, New York Times, L.A. Times, and CNNMoney. In addition, UniversalGiving™ was the 2006 Webby Award honoree and won W3's 2007 Silver Award for Creative Excellence on the Web. UniversalGiving™ is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, whose vision is to "create a world where giving and volunteering are a natural part of everyday life."™ Before UniversalGiving™, Pamela co-founded VolunteerMatch, which has matched more than 4 million volunteers with nonprofits. During her time with there, Pamela also launched VolunteerMatch Corporate, a customized version for employee volunteer programs. More than 20 Fortune 500 companies became clients, providing 43% of Volunteer Match’s sustainability. Pamela's global experience includes work and volunteering abroad in microfinance in remote villages of India; crisis relief work in the 2000 El Salvador earthquake; sustainable farming in Guatemala; digital divide training in Cambodia; and indigenous community preservation in Ecuador. Pamela has a political science degree cum laudé at Duke University and a Masters on scholarship at the Annenberg School of Communications, USC, in International Communications.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Want The Whole Person.” – D. J. Depree

 

“Henry Ford said, “bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.” D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: “I want all of you here. I want the whole person.”

- J. Kermit Campbell

 

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Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do. It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

 


J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company. In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children. In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law. D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor. D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company. D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Herman Miller Official Website, Fowler, Glenn, Dec. 13, 1999, D. J. DePree, Who Broke Ground In Furniture Design, Is Dead at 99, The New York Times, http://bit.do/fg6Lq  Fig¹.  Photo by David Martin on Unsplash 

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution To Any Relationship Problem

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

― Abraham Lincoln

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

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Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves being right.

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end. Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

It wins no battles. Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets

 

We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led. Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful. It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

Two Women Sitting on Ground Near Bonfire

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family. It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 


Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He is regarded as one of America’s greatest heroes due to his role as savior of the Union and emancipator of slaves. His rise from humble beginnings to achieving the highest office in the land is a remarkable story. His eloquent support of democracy and insistence that the Union was worth saving embody the ideals of self-government that all nations strive to achieve. Lincoln’s distinctively humane personality and incredible impact on the nation have endowed him with an enduring legacy. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. Lincoln married Mary Todd on November 4, 1842, at her sister Elizabeth’s home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 23 years old and he was 33 years of age. They had four sons, all born in Springfield.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY  Fig¹.  Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Alexander Ramsey on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Vera Arsic on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Start By Listening

 

“My goal is to extract a design that emerges from the essence of the music rather than to decorate its story…   This process usually takes two to three months of immersing myself in the opera by listening to it 200 to 300 times.”

– Jun Kaneko

 

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Master designer Jun Kaneko provides the design for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute…and what a powerful way he envisages how to create this vision for us all. It’s synergistic, based on pulling all elements together and starting with one of the most important qualities… listening.

 

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No matter your profession, you can be a good listener today. You might listen to the preschool kids you manage. You might listen to your elderly dog that would like a nice tummy rub. You might listen to your neighbor who asked you to trim the tree so it doesn’t hang over his property. Or you might create an amazing work of art such as Jun Kaneko through The Magic Flute. While his work seems supra-important, every person’s effort to listen is just as important.  

 

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If we listened and did this for hours like Jun, everyone would be happy. Relationships with people would be lovely.

The World Can Be Lovely If We Will Just Listen,

Pamela


Jun Kaneko is a Japanese-American visual artist, with sculptures and other artwork in more than 50 museums. He has previously worked on opera productions for Madama Butterfly and Fidelio. His works in clay explore the effects of repeated abstract surface motifs. He was the Production Designer for the San Francisco Opera’s production of The Magic Flute, which opened in June 2012.

Kaneko is married to sculptor Ree Kaneko who is also an American artist, arts administrator, and art consultant from Omaha, Nebraska. The couple first met when Ree attended a workshop on Ceramic Sculpture with Tony Hepburn, held June 8–14, 1981, at the Omaha Brickworks. They have two daughters, Susan Schonlau and Troia Schonlau, from a prior marriage. Both daughters work at the Kankeo Studio

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Scott Drickey on ipa  Fig². Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by  Juri Gianfrancesco on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “When You’re At The Table, You’re Open And Your Defenses Are Down”

 

“People want that gathering together. The table is magical. When you’re at the table, you’re open and your defenses are down.”

―Lidia Bastianich

 

Mealtimes seem to be a time of the past. We eat in our cars and desks or even holding a power bar walking out the door…

 

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Yet, Lidia points out how we can find deep caring and nourishment at the table. It’s not just sharing food, but also sharing of our hearts and feelings.

It’s a time to be a sounding board and to have sounding boards…from people who truly care about you. It’s a time to relax, and yet also profound as some of the most important issues in your life may come out in a casual way.

 

Two Women And One Man Eating

 

Don’t miss this time with your loved ones. “The table is magical.”  Or I might add  “The people at the table are magical.”

You’re Magical,

Pamela


Lidia Matticchio Bastianich (born on February 21, 1947, in Pula, Croatia–then a part of Italy), is an American chef, television host, author, and restaurateur. Specializing in Italian and Italian-American cuisine, Lidia has been a regular contributor to public television cooking show lineups since 1998. In 2011, she launched her fourth TV series Lidia’s Italy in America. She also owns several Italian restaurants in the U.S. in partnership with her daughter Tanya Bastianich Manuali and her son, Joe Bastianich, including Felidia (founded with her ex-husband, Felice), Del Posto, Esca, and Becco in Manhattan; Lidia’s Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Lidia’s Kansas City in Kansas City, Missouri.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by The Creative Exchange on Unsplash  FIg². Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt. Aim Out Of The Ballpark.” – David Ogilvy

 

“Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ballpark. Aim for the company of the immortals.”

―David Ogilvy

 

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This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus. A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind. Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

 


David Mackenzie Ogilvy (23 June 1911 21 July 1999) was an advertising executive, widely hailed as “The Father of Advertising,and the author of the book Ogilvy on Advertising, a general commentary on advertising. He was born in West Horsley, Surrey in England and his parents were Dorothy Blow Fairfield and Francis John Longley Ogilvy, the latter a classics scholar and a financial broker. David attended St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne; Fettes College in Edinburgh; and Christ Church, Oxford.  While working as an AGA salesman he wrote The Theory and Practice of Selling the AGA Cooker, considered by Fortune magazine as the finest sales instruction manual written. The manual led to his next job as account executive at London advertising agency Mather & Crowther, run by his older brother Francis. After WWII and having worked as a chef, researcher, and farmer Ogilvy started his own advertising agency in New York called Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather, where David was its Chairman until he retired in 1973. In the 1980s he returned as Chairman of the companys India office, then as temporary Chairman of the agencys German office, and visited and represented the companys branches around the world.

Ogilvy married three times, the first two marriages ending in divorce: first to Melinda Street, where they had one child, David Fairfield Ogilvy; then to Anne Cabot; and later on, Herta Lans until his passing in 1999 at his home in Bonnes, France.  In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of British Empire (CBE), adding to his many honors and achievements. In his lifetime and onwards he established his advertising philosophys four basic principles: creative brilliance, research, actual results for clients, and professional discipline.  

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by ogilvywashington on flickr

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “All I Could Do Was Lean On My Faith.” – Gabby Douglas

 

“Things didn’t work out the way they’d hoped. The apartment where we were supposed to stay fell through. Jobs were hard to come by, and the money ran out.

We had to live in our van and eat peanut butter and jelly sandwich for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Everyone except me. Even though Mom fed me constantly, I couldn’t keep anything down and kept losing weight. She couldn’t figure out what was wrong.

“We didn’t have health insurance. Or money to take you to the doctor.” Mom told me later. “Baby, all I could do was lean on my faith.”She sat on the floor of our van, held me in her arms and prayed words from Isaiah over and over. She asked God to heal me, and he came through. By the time my parents could afford a doctor, the disease had gone away. I was still on the small side but I was as healthy as could be.”¹

―Gabby Douglas

 

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Gabby Douglas went on to win a gold in the Olympics. She was the first to win one for African Americans in the individual all-around event. Gabrielle means “God’s able-bodied one.”

 

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No matter what the human scene is telling us, you are always more than able through God. But you need to believe it now. And again, and again and again. You are able for whatever you need to face in front of you!

 


Gabrielle Douglas (born December 31, 1995, in Virginia Beach, VA) began formal gymnastics training at 6-years-old and won a state championship by the time she was 8. She moved away from her hometown and family in 2010 to pursue training with world-renowned Olympic coach Liang Chow and was selected to compete with the U.S. Olympic women’s gymnastics team at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. There, Douglas became the first African American to win gold in the individual all-around event. She also won a team gold medal with teammates Aly Raisman, Kyla Ross, McKayla Maroney and Jordyn Wieber, the first gold medal for the American women’s gymnastics team since 1996.

¹Quote Source from Guideposts  Bio Source: Biography  Fig¹. Photo by jspizarro on flickr  Fig². Photo by Charles Perkins on flickr 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Days Of Linear Giving Are Over

 

The days of “linear giving” are over — what I mean is, it’s not “I give you this, you give me that.”  That’s Linear Giving and it doesn’t always happen.

 

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First, you can’t truly give with the expectation that you are going to get something in return.  It’s just not the right motivation. And it will upset the balance of giving, turning it into something it’s not…

 

 

We need to give because we sincerely want to. Because it’s the right thing to do. It’s helpful, kind, nourishing to the world. And ultimately it does help ourselves… we feel nourished and uplifted by the mere act of being generous.

And it won’t stop there. More goodwill continues to come to you, in ways you never expected. From different places, different sources, and in unique ways! It’s truly quite exciting…to see good unfold when we let it go.

 

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So let’s not give and expect back. It’s not A gives to B, and B to gives to A.

It’s A gives to B. And then A gives to C and D. Then X, M, Q, and V give back to A at different times and ways in the future.

 

 

It’s circular, spherical, timeless, unbound, ever-connected giving… which is taking place, and always has been.


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by fauxels on Pexels