Author Archives: Pamela Hawley

About Pamela Hawley

Pamela is the founder and CEO of UniversalGiving™ (www.UniversalGiving.org). UniversalGiving™ (UG) is an award winning marketplace which allows people to give and volunteer with the top-performing projects all over the world. UniversalGiving™ offers a variety of ways for donors to become involved through individual Projects or Gift Packages. Visitors simply choose a region (such as Africa) and an issue (such as education or the environment) and receive a list of quality ways to give and volunteer. When giving, 100% of your donation goes directly to the project. UniversalGiving™ performs due diligence on all its projects through its unique, trademarked Quality Model™. To date, almost $1.5 million and 8,000 volunteers have been matched through www.UniversalGiving.org. UniversalGiving™ has most recently been featured in the Christian Science Monitor, Self Magazine, Chicago Sun Times, New York Times, L.A. Times, and CNNMoney. In addition, UniversalGiving™ was the 2006 Webby Award honoree and won W3's 2007 Silver Award for Creative Excellence on the Web. UniversalGiving™ is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, whose vision is to "create a world where giving and volunteering are a natural part of everyday life."™ Before UniversalGiving™, Pamela co-founded VolunteerMatch, which has matched more than 4 million volunteers with nonprofits. During her time with there, Pamela also launched VolunteerMatch Corporate, a customized version for employee volunteer programs. More than 20 Fortune 500 companies became clients, providing 43% of Volunteer Match’s sustainability. Pamela's global experience includes work and volunteering abroad in microfinance in remote villages of India; crisis relief work in the 2000 El Salvador earthquake; sustainable farming in Guatemala; digital divide training in Cambodia; and indigenous community preservation in Ecuador. Pamela has a political science degree cum laudé at Duke University and a Masters on scholarship at the Annenberg School of Communications, USC, in International Communications.

The Pamela Positive: “Love Is, Hate Is Made”

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Let’s really think about this quote by Rebecca Beardsly…

“Love IS… hate is made.”

It tells us that love is a power which is already existing.

Hate of itself does not exist on its own. We manufacture it.

How are we living the power of Love today?

Let’s focus on this, rather than being a part of creating negative actions and reactions.

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The Classic Pamela Positive: Should Our Work Make Us Happy?

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I find that so much of what is true ‘happiness’ in one’s job is how we conduct ourselves and our thinking.

For example, even if your job isn’t your exact ideal, there are elements that can bring full happiness. Being of service is not relegated to any one sector. Being professional, kind, courteous, and with a high “client service” attitude to external parties as well as to the internal team, can bring high “happiness” value.
Ideally, it should be coupled with sincere appreciation in return.  Regardless, it makes us feel happy to deliver sincere value. We hold a “high happiness quotient” in our own esteem for ourselves and how we are serving.

On the larger scale of trying to find something you love to do–I do think each person has a wonderful contribution in life and is here for a reason. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to search for it. Part of the searching makes us who we are; hones our goals; and positively affects others along the way… Life is not just an end game of finding the one job which makes you happy. You are evolving, and your happiness, and therefore growth, is also evolving.

Today Matters — by John Maxwell

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Team, today matters.  Inspirational Leader John Maxwell outlines our pathway to success:

Today Matters. 12 Daily Disciplines to Guarantee Success

 Choose and display the right attitude

Determine and act on important priorities

Know and follow healthy guidelines

Communicate with and care for your family

Practice and develop good thinking

Make and keep proper commitments

Make and properly manage your money

Deepen and live out your spiritual faith

Initiate and invest in solid personal relationships

Plan for and model being generosity

Seek out and embrace personal improvements

Today matters, team.  We don’t take a day for granted. Live it with meaning, purpose and joy.
daily success

John C. Maxwell is an American author and leadership expert. His books–especially the 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, have sold millions of copies and have even landed him on the New York Time’s Bestseller List. Born in 1947 to an evangelical family in Garden City, Michigan, Maxwell was exposed to a religious lifestyle from a young age. He served as a senior pastor at Skyline Church for 14 years, but in 1995, he decided to devote his efforts full-time to writing and speaking. It was then that Maxwell began to think deeply about leadership.
He founded INJOY, Maximum Impact, the John Maxwell Team, ISS, and EQUIP. EQUIP is an international leadership development organization that works to develop leaders; in fact, it is involved with leaders from over 80 nations. Its mission is to “see effective leaders fulfill the Great Commission in every nation,” the Great Commission being a tenet of Christianity about the instructions of Jesus Christ. Maxwell speaks to Fortune 500 companies, international organizations, and even the United States Military Academy about effective leadership strategies. Notably, he was one of the 25 authors named to Amazon’s 10th Anniversary Hall of Fame. In 2014, he was Inc. Magazine’s #1 leadership and management expert in the world.
 

Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

A photo by Dogancan Ozturan. unsplash.com/photos/94taEmdowRw

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second? First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change. Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

Second then is body language and what we communicate; third come the words.

The Pamela Positive: “Do What’s Right For You…Nothing Good Happens Out of Fear.”

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“Do what’s right for you…nothing good happens out of fear.”  – Juliana Margulies

Juliana is an accomplished actress with ER and The Good Wife. As an actress, she faces fear continually in performing under pressure, or simply lining up her next role. Yet as challenging as that is, she encourages us to do what’s right for us… to follow our calling… and to never be ruled by FEAR. Remember that FEAR is False Evidence Appearing Real.  Don’t let the appearance delude you.

Follow what you are called to; follow the truth for you; and you are going to find a beautiful pathway of expression of yourself, filled with peace and happiness.

Then encourage others to do the same, so they can be their full selves too. No one deserves to be ruled by fear. Be ruled by Truth and Love.

“I wanted to convey to these students to live your life truthfully, do what’s right for you – not what others think is right for you. Nothing good happens out of fear. Do what you love doing. It might be scary because you’re taking a risk, but at the end of the day you can say you tried.” – Juliana Margulies, in a graduation speech at Sarah Lawrence, her alma mater

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy.  More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards.

The Pamela Positive: “It Is the Open-Mindedness to Little Things That Brings Human Success.”

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What a wonderful story which shows how we can all be resourceful. We can figure out a different way to achieve even our smallest needs, and maintain a positive outlook. Look up, look around, and use what you see!

It’s there for us all…It’s already been provided.

***

I said to a relative of mine, who was a professor at Harvard:
“I was cold all the time I was there, and I shivered so that my teeth shook”.
Said he: “Why did you shiver?”
“Because it was cold.”

“No, that is not the reason you shivered.”
Then I said: “I shivered because I had not bed-clothes enough.”
“No, that is not the reason.”

“Well,” said I, “Professor, you are a scientific man. I am not.
I would like to have an expert, scientific opinion now,
why I shivered.”

He arose in his own way and said:
“Young man, you shivered because you did not know any better!
Didn’t you have in your pocket a newspaper?”
“Oh, yes, I had a “Herald” and a “Journal”.”

“That is it. You had them in your pocket, and if you had spread one
newspaper over your sheet when you went to bed, you would have
been as warm as you lay there, as the richest man in America under
all his silk coverlids.

But you shivered because you didn’t know enough
to put a two-cent newspaper on your bed, and you had it in your pocket.”

It is the open-mindedness to little things that brings human success.

***

Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

The Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself; he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”  –Johan Wolfgang von Goethe

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it.   To being honest with ourselves…and to overcoming the challenge.  We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.   With that honesty, as Goethe states, “(the criticism) will gradually yield to him.”

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German writer and artist, and a leading figure in German literature.  His works include The Sorrows of Young Werther and Faust.  He was highly influential to the 19th century.