Tag Archives: Appreciation

The Classic Pamela Positive: What We Can Learn from the Gentle, Observant Jain Religion

 

Jainism is a group that believes we should leave barely a footprint on this earth. They believe in gentility, kindness, and care for every living creature. It’s even to the extent of not eating root vegetables because pulling up the roots makes the plant die. Jains honor every living thing.

 

photo of foot steps on sand

 

Founded in a similar time frame as Buddhism, Jainism primarily existed in Hindu parts of India. In the present day it is a small but powerful minority among the world’s religions, with some 4 million followers in India and growing communities elsewhere in the world. A few core beliefs of Jainism include that every living being has a soul; non-violence is the path to right thinking; attachment to possessions should be limited, and one’s life should be lived to be useful to others.

May we be gentle, respectful and observant of the preciousness of life in all its form.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Roman Kraft on Unsplush

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In the Happy Moments, Praise God.”

 

“In the happy moments, praise God. In the difficult moments, seek God. In the quiet moments, trust God.  In every moment, thank God.”

 Anonymous

 

brown wooden board

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Pro Church Media on Unsplash

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE.”

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela, that’s a TREE. We can’t hurt the trees!”

 

A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6 and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

 

macro shot photography of tree during daytime

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.”

Anyone who doesn’t have hope for our future should rethink. What a wonderful opening our world is facing where we teach elementary kids the connection between paper and our living trees…to be conscious of conserving, so that Lindsey and others grow up with conservation being a natural part of their lives.

There is a new standard of living being created, and not only our youth, but our elementary school children, are leading the way.

 


Fig¹. Photo by David Vig on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India ‘Namaste’ Means: I Honor the Place in You of Love, of Light, of Truth, of Peace.” -Ram Dass

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

-Ram Dass

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

woman sitting on rock near green tree under white clouds and blue sky

 

Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing. Be amazed.

Ram Dass teaches us to honor the divine in everyone, regardless of their background, religion, ethnicity, or thoughts. He’s practiced this at Harvard, India and all over, striving to bring peace to the world, person by person.

 

sailboat on body of water during daytime

 

So, who do you see the divine in today? Who amazes you today?

For me, it is my Mom. She is a great person, a great mom, a sincere friend a shining light of care for others. She is that peacegiver of divine love, loving others, all the time.

 


Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions. He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet. He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

Bio Sources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org

Fig¹. Brooke Cagle on Unsplash
Fig². Kevin Noble on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Right Timing in Your Life: What We Can Learn from Japan’s Edo Era

 

During the Edo era in Japan (1603-1868), the only wood they’d use from the forest was if a branch had fallen from a tree. In the same way, we don’t pick fruit before it’s ripe.

We don’t wrench the immature tomato from the vine. When it is the right time, you’ll find it almost drops off naturally in your hand.

 

selective focus photo of red cherry tomatoes

 

Perhaps then, the message for us in present-day is, don’t cut down the wood until the tree is ready to release its branch. Perhaps all the wood we need will fall naturally and offer itself to you. This will be right timing for the tree as well as your needs.

Is there an area you are pushing for, that is perhaps unripe? Perhaps it’s time to gently let it go. We can let right timing lead, delivering the gift to you and everyone, at its specially appointed time.

Let’s enjoy the gifts, events, and happenstances which are given naturally to us.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Davor Denkovski on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Tell Your Team They Are Great and DON’T Give Them Anything To Do 

 

One of the most powerful things you can do to recognize someone on your team is to call them and thank them and say Youre doing a wonderful job today, and I wanted to thank you. Thats it. I just wanted you to know, and for you to take the time to recognize it. Please know how much I appreciate your consistent work and positive attitude.” 

 

Thank You! Heart Text

 

Do not add on a to do.

I know thats tempting as we as CEOs have a lot we want to accomplish! But just let the conversation rest in genuine appreciation.

Its one of the best ways you can thank someone without agenda.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Raj Vaishnaw on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

Photo of Woman Raising Both Hands

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 


John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach. He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels