Tag Archives: Appreciation

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

 

 

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Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best.  You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 

 


 

 

John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach.  He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children.  After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Future Will Belong To the Nature-Smart…The More High-Tech We Become, the More Nature We Need.” – Richard Louv

 

“The future will belong to the nature-smart…The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”

– Richard Louv

 

 

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We email, text, tweet, and then buy on Amazon.  The Tribune Media Group recently reported we’re on the Web at over 5 hours each day.  In addition to that, we’re involved in technology almost every day.

Do we see Nature every day?

 

 

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Even if the nature immediately around you isn’t as beautiful as above, there is still so much glory. The sun, green grass, fresh air, a cool breeze, rain that refreshes all and cleans the earth.

 

 

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Look up to the sky.

I remember as child, one of my favorite things was playing outdoors in my backyard. I’d be in the sandbox, gazing at the glorious California blue of the sky, and the tall, green trees for which “Palo Alto” was named.  The very tip tops seemed to frame in their own haphazard way, a fringe around the sky.  And seeing that medium dark green up next to a beautiful heaven blue, was  a bit of perfection.  It was peacefulness in my childhood.

So technology does seem to reign at times.   It’s what life has evolved to, and we shouldn’t stop it.  It allows us to stay in touch with people we love, and to get certain things done quicker.  Yet, we can take steps to ensure balance in our lives. Balance for engaging with the natural world just as much as we do with gadgets.

Join me in appreciating whatever nature is in front of you today,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Richard Louv is a journalist and author of books about the connections amongst family, nature, and community.  He is the founding chairman of the Children & Nature Network, an organization that helps to connect today’s children and future generations to the natural world.  Louv is also Honorary Co-chairman of Canada’s national Children and Nature Alliance; a part of the board of directors of ecoAmerica and the editorial board of Ecopsychology. Previously, he was a columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune and a columnist and member of the editorial advisory board for Parents magazine.  Louv’s accomplishments include the 2007 Cox Award for “sustained achievement in public service,” the highest honor of Clemson University.   In 2009, he earned the International Making Cities Livable Jane Jacobs Award.

Louv is married to Kathy Frederick Louv and the father of two sons, Jason and Matthew.  Although an author and journalist, Richard Louv has said about himself that “he would rather fish than write.”

Bio source: About Richard Louv

Statistic source: Tribune Media Group

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Selfless Person Is More Concerned About the Happiness of Another…”

 

“A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes.

A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. ”

–H. Burke Peterson

 

 

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What a great lesson to learn today, team Living and Giving. You need
to think about how you can think about others. 

We all have a tendency to think about our lives, our pathway, our job,
our marriage, our date, our dog, our, our, OUR!

Get off yourself and on to serving others.   You will feel an
indescribable joy, and, relief!  Life is not just about you. Start
living… for others.

I love you,
Pamela


 

 

H. Burke Peterson was an authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the author of “A Glimpse of Glory”. He was born in Salt Lake City, Utah and grew up in Phoenix, Arizona. In World War II, he fought with the American Navy in the Pacific theatre.  After the war, he attended the University of Arizona and went on to receive his masters at the Utah State Agricultural College. Throughout his time serving in the church, he was published in The Ensign of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which is the official periodical of the Church, numerous times He was married to Brookie Carden in 1947, and they had five daughters.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

 

Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or Spiritual Poverty.™ I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

 

 

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Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

 

 

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We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

 

 

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Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

 

 

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I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Lee Myungseon on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Sai De Silva on Usnplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Ramdan Authentic on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at A Stranger, and The Important Reason Why” – Juliana Margulies

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

— Juliana Margulies

 

 

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I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 


 

 

Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosopher and Madison Avenue advertising executive. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one young son together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

 

Terri has it right. What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

 

 

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Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important we keep doing so. At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so… however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth. So we must honor them, honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

 

As far as paddling one’s own canoe. As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.” She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together. We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there. She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special. She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

 

 

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Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Clear About What Is Truly Essential”

 

Marine corps officer Robert J. Wicks shares with us some important lessons on life and nature.

Rather than read, he encourages us to reflect.  If we face a challenge, we can act not from anger but from joy and grounded peace.

 

 

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From his book, Streams of Contentment, here are three tips on living a natural, and successful life.

* Be clear about what is truly essential.

* Appreciate everything and everyone in your life right now.

* Recognize that a little silence and solitude is no small thing.

– Robert J. Wicks

When we appreciate what is important, right now, we honor life and everyone around us.

 

 


 

 

 

Robert J. Wicks is a clinical psychologist and author, interested in how spirituality and psychology are intertwined. He graduated from Fairfield University in Connecticut in 1968, with a B.A. in psychology and philosophy. He later went on to receive his PhD in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, now known as Drexel University Medical College. Wicks has taught at a number of universities, given commencement speeches, and presented to Congress. In the 1990s, he worked with relief workers, who were working in Rwanda during the civil war. He has also worked with professionals who support Iraqi and Afghan war veterans in the early 2000s. Throughout his career, he has published over 40 books inspired by his studies into psychology and spirituality. Wicks has received a number of awards including the The Humanitarian Award Association for Spiritual, Ethical, Religious and Value Issues in Counseling American Counseling Association. He has been married to his wife, Michaele Barry Wicks, for over 40 years and they have one daughter together.