Tag Archives: spirituality

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Soul Is the Core of Your Being.” – Deepak Chopra

 

“The soul is the core of your being. Your body is in your soul. Your mind is in your soul. The whole universe is in your soul, and your soul is part of the universal consciousness.”

― Deepak Chopra

 

We get caught up in Silicon Valley. Caught up in the highrises of Hong Kong, our most expensive real estate in the world. Caught up in fashion, fancy dinners and high living.

 

 

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But Deepak Chopra tells us we need to be caught up in the soul. In fact, everything relates to it. Our goodness, ethics, love, ability to help, care and do is essential to our soul. It’s essential that this expression of soul also helps others in the most meaningful and permanent way possible.

We can’t escape matters of the heart, and we can’t escape matters of the soul. It’s what populates our true being, and the true being of the world. 

 

 

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Be Invested in Soul Living,

Pamela

 

 


Deepak Chopra is an India-born, American author and lecturer, focusing on spirituality and mind-body health. He began his career as a doctor, before moving into alternative medicine. He focuses on meditation and spiritual practices, and the effect of one’s thoughts and emotions on one’s physical health. He is a prominent figure in the New Age movement, and the author of more than 65 books, including 19 New York Times bestsellers. He has sold more than 20 million copies. His books include The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Buddha: A Story of Enlightenment, and Jesus: A Story of Enlightenment. Deepak and his wife, Rita, have been married for over 30 years, and they have two children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Deepak Chopra Official Website, https://www.deepakchopra.com/metahuman

OPRAH.COM, Published on May 15, 2012, “What’s the Secret to a Happy Life? Oprah Talks to Deepak Chopra”, http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Oprahs-Trip-to-India-Oprahs-Interview-with-Deepak-Chopra/4#ixzz1yHRQDozu 

Fig¹.Photo by JD Mason on Unsplash 

Fig².Photo by Brett Zeck on Unsplash

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

 

 

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”

—Lao Tzu

 

green leafed plant on clear glass vase filled with water

 

 

Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure. If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism. It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

 

man standing on stone looking at sunset

 

 

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted. We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

 

 


Legends vary, but scholars place Lao Tzu birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

According to many popular legends, the philosopher got married and also had a son named ‘Zong’, who later became a legendary soldier.

Biosource: Wikipedia, The Famous People


Citations:

Fig¹.Sarah Dorweiler on Unsplash

Fig².Joshua Earle on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.” —George Gurdjieff

 

 

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.”

—George Gurdjieff

 

 

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

 

 

woman sitting on dock during daytime

 

 

From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others. We see everyone connected in spirit. We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves. So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.

 

 

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George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man.

He was born to a Caucasus Greek father, and an Armenian mother in Alexandropol (now Gyumri). Early influences on him included his father, a carpenter and amateur ashik or bardic poet. The young Gurdjieff avidly read Russian-language scientific literature. Influenced by these writings, and having witnessed a number of phenomena that he could not explain, he formed the conviction that there is a hidden truth not to be found in science or in mainstream religion.

He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹.  Paola Chaaya on Unsplash

Fig².  Josh Appel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “God Is Awake” – Victor Hugo

 

“When you have laboriously accomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”

– Victor Hugo

 

Mr. Hugo points to our American culture for sure: We work and work and work. We are a productive country, a do-er people. Even though lately we have so many inefficiencies in government and programs, as individuals, we ‘do.’

And so we must pause. We must reflect. We realize when we lay our heads gently down for rest, that God is watching.

 

 

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She is caring and loving. He is standing guard. This loving Principle may even be shaping our thoughts so that we awake refreshed. We can start the day with greater clarity and positive purpose than the day before.

Work…Rest…Trust God…

 

 

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And so we live Life fully.

 

 


 

Victor Hugo (1802 – 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist. He is considered as one of the most well-known French Romantic writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry. Among many volumes, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).  Les Miserables focused on social issues of the time, and helped bring these to wider attention. Hugo was married to a childhood friend, Adele Foucher, and they had five children.

Source photo: everystockphoto.com

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

 “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

 

 

 

sea-dawn-sunset-cloudy

 

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

 

– John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a
bit of calm.  See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind.  Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

 

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”

—Lao Tzu

 

photo-1523441263-830cac2fe90b

 

 

Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure. If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism. It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

 

photo-1526779259212-939e64788e3c.jpeg

 

 

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted. We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

 

 


 

 

Legends vary, but scholars place Lao Tzu birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “UnConference Room” Your Meeting with a Peaceful Banyan Tree

 

This is Part One of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree.

There are many images that come to mind when we think of Asia, from dragons to beautiful beaches, spanning varied cultures. 

 

 

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One of my favorite views is that of the banyan tree, for it must be strongly grounded in the earth, which also allows its larger branches and leaves to provide overreaching shade.

 

 

banyantree_jeep2499_sstock.jpgPhoto from Shutterstock

 


 
It was under a banyan tree where the Buddha felt his calling to a new level of enlightenment. Under these same trees, Gujarati businessmen hold their meetings. It is even used as a place for political meetings: Recently in Malaysia, the state assembly met underneath the welcome atmosphere of the banyan tree. So for much of Asia, spirituality, entrepreneurship, politics are taking place right outdoors.

 

 

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Photo from Walk of Hope 2015-16

 



The banyan tree represents solidity, rootedness, and strength. At the same time, it also represents comfort, shade and welcome.  It is a source of power, balanced with peace.  It represents firmness, as well as welcome.

 

This is Part One of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree. Read Part Two tomorrow.