Tag Archives: spirituality

The Pamela Positive: “To Be an Altruist, You Must First Be an Egoist.”

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.” – George Gurdjieff

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self-awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others.  We see everyone connected in spirit.  We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves.  So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.

George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man. He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

The Pamela Positive: “To Be an Altruist, You Must First Be an Egoist.”

“To be an altruist, you must first be an egoist.” – George Gurdjieff

In 1919 Armenian George Gurdjieff founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Tbilisi, Georgia, in order to serve men in peace. Yet Mr. Gurdjieff’s commitment to helping others began with himself. It was about complete self-awareness; absorption in meditation; and pushing oneself to a higher attunement to the Spirit.  In so doing, we are then able to be conscious of our own spirituality as foremost in thought.

From that standpoint, we can then go on to help others.  We see everyone connected in spirit.  We wish the best for others as we strive for peace and perfect alignment for spirit for ourselves.  So we focus first on our own spiritual commitment, before we focus on helping other’s spirit, in this wonderful journey of life.

George Gurdjieff was an Armenian mystic and philosopher. He traveled in the Middle East, Africa, and Central Asia as a young man. He taught in Moscow and St. Petersburg, and in 1919 he founded the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man at Tiflis (now Tbilisi), Georgia. In 1922 he reestablished the institute at Fontainebleau, France, gathering a group of followers who lived communally, engaging in philosophical dialogue, ritual exercises, and dance. His basic assertion was that ordinary living was akin to sleep and that through spiritual discipline it was possible to achieve heightened levels of vitality and awareness. The Fontainebleau centre closed in 1933, but Gurdjieff continued to teach in Paris until his death.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In Happy Moments…”

“In happy moments, praise God.  In the difficult moments, seek God.  In the quiet moments, trust God.  In every moment, thank God.”

– Anonymous

The Pamela Positive: “We’re All Just Walking Each Other Home” – Ram Dass

“We’re all just walking each other home.”

– Ram Dass

Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert) is a Hindu spiritual teacher, and the author of Be Here Now.  He was born Jewish, considered himself an Atheist in his early years, and went on a spiritual search to India in the 1960s.  There he met Neem Karoli Baba, who became his guru, and gave him the name Ram Dass, meaning “servant of God.”  Ram Dass has written more than ten books and founded two foundations, the Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “God Is Awake” – Victor Hugo

“When you have laboriously accomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”
– Victor Hugo

Mr. Hugo points to our American culture for sure: We work and work and work. We are a productive country, a do-er people. Even though lately we have so many inefficiencies in government and programs, as individuals, we ‘do.’

And so we must pause. We must reflect. We realize when we lay our heads gently down for rest, that God is watching.

She is caring and loving. He is standing guard. This loving Principle may even be shaping our thoughts so that we awake refreshed. We can start the day with greater clarity and positive purpose than the day before.

Work…Rest…Trust God…

And so we live Life fully.

sanmenxia-male-sleep-478382-o-smallVictor Hugo (1802 – 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist. He is considered as one of the most well-known French Romantic writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry. Among many volumes, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).  Les Miserables focused on social issues of the time, and helped bring these to wider attention.  Hugo was married to a childhood friend, Adele Foucher, and they had five children.

Source photo: everystockphoto.com

“Young man, young man, your arm’s too short to box with God.” -James Weldon Johnson

“Young man, young man, your arm’s too short to box with God.”

-James Weldon Johnson

James Weldon Johnson was born on June 17, 1871, in Jacksonville, Florida. Johnson distinguished himself equally as a man of letters and as a civil rights leader in the early decades of the twentieth century. A talented poet and novelist, Johnson is credited with bringing a new standard of artistry and realism to black literature in such works as The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man and God’s Trombones.  He founded the Daily American newspaper in 1895, passed the bar in 1897, and wrote the song, “Lift Every Voice and Sing.” His pioneering studies of black poetry, music, and theater in the 1920s also helped introduce many white Americans to the genuine African American creative spirit, hitherto known mainly through the distortions of the minstrel show and dialect poetry. Meanwhile, as head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) during the 1920s, Johnson led determined civil rights campaigns in an effort to remove the legal, political, and social obstacles hindering black achievement.

The Pamela Positive: “The Soul Is the Core of Your Being” – Deepak Chopra

“The soul is the core of your being. Your body is in your soul. Your mind is in your soul. The whole universe is in your soul, and your soul is part of the universal consciousness.”

– Deepak Chopra, in an interview with Oprah

Deepak Chopra is an India-born, American author and lecturer, focusing on spirituality and mind-body health.  He began his career as a doctor, before moving into alternative medicine.  He focuses on meditation and spiritual practices, and the effect of one’s thoughts and emotions on one’s physical health.  He is a prominent figure in the New Age movement, and the author of more than 65 books, including 19 New York Times bestsellers.  He has sold more than 20 million copies.  His books include The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, Buddha: A Story of Enlightenment, and Jesus: A Story of Enlightenment.  Deepak and his wife, Rita, have been married for over 30 years, and they have two children.

Read Deepak’s full interview with Oprah here.