Tag Archives: Giving

The Good Trade: How to Give Back When You’re Short on Cash Part II

In Part I of this series, we talked about attitude changes making meaningful phone calls are ways that simultaneously save money and give back to your community. In Part II,  we finish this series with other ideas that make you feel good without spending!

Missed Part I? Click here! 

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3. THANK YOU NOTES

While some people enjoy receiving gifts, all of us appreciate a kind word. It is one thing to say it, but it can be even more meaningful to put a note in writing. What if you made a commitment to write a thank you note to someone every week? Since the invention of stamps in 1840, this has been possible. Hallmark really innovated by coming up with the concept of greeting cards. In the early 1900s an aspiring entrepreneur, Joyce Clyde Hall, left Nebraska to sell his cards in Kansas City.  He simply had positive quotes, and put them in the cards. Soon we had cards for birthdays, anniversaries, graduations and the like.

Now you can congratulate friends on a new job, express condolences for the passing of a loved one, or simply say you are thinking of them. You can think of any positive reason you like. Handwritten letters are memorable, and heartfelt.

4. INVITE SOMEONE OVER FOR DINNER

You never know what someone might be going through – a painful divorce, struggling through college, or just having a bad day. Opening up your home will make someone feel appreciated. In addition, it costs less than going out. The leftovers from this dinner can be packaged up for the homeless. That’s double giving!

5. SET ASIDE MONEY FROM A DAILY RITUAL TO DONATE

Giving doesn’t have to mean a life full of sacrifices. We can still buy an In-N-Out burger or get our nails done. But instead of buying several Starbuck’s coffees every week, you can drink one less.  Donate the money you saved: Even $5 can make a difference in someone’s life. In the U.S. it can buy a small lunch, but abroad it can be used to build a library or to buy mosquito nets to prevent malaria. In these cases, your money is scaling to help many people — your dollar goes even further. 
Difficult financial times does not mean your giving must shut down. Instead, it allows us to examine how our time and money are spent. Do you have time to write that kind note? Have a free moment to make a delicious home cooked meal? There are so many ways to give back that won’t hurt your wallet and will enrich your life.  It takes a different view of wealth. This kind of wealth consists of kindness, patience, and selflessness.   

There’s not a moment to wait – let’s get started giving of our abundance!

 

Click here for the full article on The Good Trade’s website!

The Classic Pamela Positive: Celebrate True Wealth

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Wealth is a state of mind and life. We tend to associate poverty with money. But poverty can be mental, emotional or spiritual poverty. I am often struck by this in my travel and volunteering in developing nations. Often, the divorce rates are low. Families not only stay together, but also spend time together. They gather food from the fields together, cook together and share meals together.

Contrast us: 15 minute family dinners if we are lucky. Fast-food and food distanced from its natural base. We eat alone; we eat in our cars. Divorces are easier to get, and in our mind it can be easier to allow those thoughts in as a possibility, rather than work through critical issues. So we lose the connection to family. We lose the connection to the local farm. We can lose the connection to long-term commitment.

We lose our greatest asset in natural wealth: relationships. Relationships with ourselves, our families, the earth. This wealth creates happy, balanced, productive, lower stress lifestyles, because we are connected in the way we are meant to be.

Further, we often pass by our heritage and where we come from. In many emerging nations, and especially in the continent of Africa, we see tribes value their connection to their heritage as primary importance even above their nationality. There is a deep-rooted connection to rituals and history which keeps people grounded in who they are, and the deeper, long-term meaning of being a part of a larger community in their lives.

Poverty is about money, at times. It has to be addressed as people should have the opportunity to live productive lives and make choices about what they would like to devote their lives to. Poverty is also about our well-being. Often when we get beyond “money poverty,” we forget “well-being poverty,” and get trapped in a go-go-go consumer culture.

I hope we can celebrate the healthy wealth that is accessible to us all in positive, committed relationships with ourselves, one another, our families, our earth, our communities and our heritage. How wonderful this is available to us all.

The Good Trade: How to Give Back When You’re Short on Cash Part I

In August, The Good Trade, a website that promotes brands, items, and ideas dedicated to social good, published our article about how to give when you’re strapped for cash.
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Giving Back Doesn’t Have To Involve Money

The global economy is a rollercoaster. China’s growth rate goes down 6%, Brexit occurs and global warming is at its worst with record breaking global temperatures. The world feels as if it is in turmoil. On top of that you’re worried about job security or paying back student loans, and charitable giving seems like a secondary priority. Don’t lose heart. Giving back and making a difference doesn’t have to break the bank.  Here are some low cost and meaningful ways to give.

 

1. CULTIVATE AN ATTITUDE OF ABUNDANCE

First, let’s start with our minds. Be courageous and realize that you have more than you think. If you have a bed, shelter, clothing, a job, and family or friends, then you are in a very “wealthy” state. Understanding your own abundance will allow you to see how much you actually have. 

Go over the positives in your life. Write down heartfelt quotes that inspire you. As you fill yourself up with this goodness, you will be able to give to others. This gratitude will not only make us feel happier, but also keep our hearts healthier.

2. PICK UP THE PHONE 

Instead of being constantly worried about where our world is going, why not pick up the phone and find out how someone else is doing? Forget your concerns for a moment. Instead of calling someone to vent, why not call them to tell them you care?

Calling someone “for no reason” is an important opportunity show them that you are thinking of them. You are taking time out of your busy day to reach out. Everyone needs someone to just listen sometimes. They may be filled with joy or sadness. Be there to celebrate their good news, or support them with compassion.

A side benefit to you is that people who have satisfying relationships with family, friends and their community are happier, have fewer health problems and live longer. Remember, listening does not cost anything financially, and look at the good you are doing!

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Stay tuned this Friday to see other ways to give when your wallet is slim!

Can’t wait until Friday? Click here for the full article!

The Pamela Positive: What We Have In Common

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You, me, the night building manager, the cleaners and homeless people all have something in common: We need to be nourished.

The other night, I was helping lead a Full Circle Fund meeting, which is working to provide economic opportunities for people across our world.  It’s a wonderful group, focused on providing financial support and volunteer time to help serve the community.

That evening, we had leftover sandwiches from dinner.  While I usually take any leftovers from the meetings I attend to homeless people, I thought perhaps I would give myself a rest from it this evening.  It was a huge tray I would have to balance, carrying my many bags as well. Yet something made me gather up the sandwiches, and hope there would be someone who would appreciate them.

When I approached the night building manager downstairs, he was a bit hesitant at first… but after positive encouragement he took two and with much gratitude. Two of the cleaners said no, hesitantly… but when I spoke to them in Spanish, they took two to three sandwiches each! As I then turned outside, a lovely man cleaning the outdoor tiles in the rain lifted up his hood, smiled widely, and took two.

I passed an elderly homeless man in a wheelchair underneath the cover of a prominent office building, who reached out to take two sandwiches as well.   As I walked down the street, a gentle, petite Asian man, with bags and bags of recycling beside him, was persistently searching through the refuse to find more cans.  He was so slight of frame and with a smile that beamed. He took the entire rest of the tray.

Within five minutes, 15 sandwiches were given. And my heart was given to as well, filled by being able to help other people in one small way.

Make the effort to give, of whatever we may have.  For we all need to be nourished.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Before You Can Give Yourself Away, You Must Have a Self to Give.”

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“Before you can give yourself away, you must have a self to give.” – Isabel Hickey

Similar to George Gurdjieff’s commitment to self and spirit before serving others, Isabel Hickey realized that we must put ourselves first.  In so doing, we become strong and committed to giving ourselves the best, and then we can give our best selves unto others…

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Isabel Hickey was an American astrologer and writer who practiced Humanist Astrology with a psychological approach. If Evangeline Adams was the Mother of Astrology in the first half of the Twentieth Century, Isabel Hickey filled that role in the Sixties and the Seventies.  She wrote “Astrology, A Cosmic Science,” “It Is All Right” and “Minerva or Pluto, The Choice Is Yours.”

“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature…” – General Peyton C. March

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“There is a wonderful mythical law of nature that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.” – Gen Peyton C. March


General March had to fight – and kill – for freedom. It’s a sad moment when we come to that. In just the 20th century alone, there were more than 50 wars. By some estimates more than 160 million people have been killed in those 100 years. Unfortunately, sometimes we have to fight for the freedom we love.


Yet General Peyton also knew a deeper truth. The best thing we can give someone is peace. It’s happiness. It’s freedom.


We can build a different future. Let’s give others the gift of freedom and happiness in a peaceful way.


 
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General Peyton Conway March was born on December 27, 1864 in Easton, Pennsylvania. As the son of an academic, General March received a full education, graduating from Lafayette College in 1884 with a major in classics before attending the United States Military Academy at West Point.

General March proved himself to be a leader early on in his career during the Battle of Manila in 1898. This accomplishment allowed him to move up in the ranks and become the army chief of staff during World War I in 1918. He established the primacy of the chief of staff in the army hierarchy. His duties included presiding over the buildup of American forces in World War I,  centralizing control over supply, creating an Air Service, Tank Corps, and Chemical Warfare Service, and supervising the demobilization at war’s end. His actions played a large role in designing the powerful position of the chief of staff in the 20th century.

Frederick Palmer, a famous war correspondent during this time period, was amazed by March’s ability to focus on tasks. In turn, March expected this type of razor focus from his men. While working with him, most officers worked longer hours and increased overall efficiency. Although some people describe General March as a know-it-all, his leadership skills were never affected by his pride.

He retired as a Major General in 1921, and was advanced to General on the retired list. He had married Cora V. McEntee in 1923. He died in Washington, D.C. on 13 April 1955, and was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive…” ~Howard Washington Thurman

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“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.” ~Howard Thurman

You’re searching. Somehow, even though you have a great life, you feel like something is missing.

 

What is it?

 

Your investment job is fine. You have a nice apartment, a fine girlfriend and a dog. Maybe you’re a mom whose kids have just gone off to school, and you have some time to yourself. Maybe you’re a student. You’ve got straight As, you’re playing soccer, and things are going along.

 

Yet something doesn’t feel quite right.

 

You’ve seen signs around for “Stand up to Cancer” and you wonder: should you join this cause?
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When your heart isn’t quite full, giving back is the way to go. But you should find the right way. Listen to your heart……
Is it animals?

 

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The Earth?
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Saving a child in Haiti from poverty?
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Helping an elephant?

 

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Whatever you do, give with your heart for the right reasons. That’s the best way to serve the world. Don’t follow a sign; follow the signal in your heart.

 

 
Howard Washington Thurman (November 18, 1899 – April 10, 1981) was an influential African American author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader. He played a leading role in many social justice movements and organizations of the twentieth century and was one of the leading religious figures of twentieth-century America. Thurman’s theology of radical nonviolence influenced and shaped a generation of civil rights activists and he was a key mentor to leaders within the movement such as Martin Luther King, Jr.
Thurman served as dean of Rankin Chapel at Howard University from 1932 to 1944 and as dean of Marsh Chapel at Boston University from 1953 to 1965. He was always interested in intersections of race and religion as shown through his journey to India. Here, he interacted with many Asian students and conversed with Hindus, Muslims, and Buddhists. In 1944 he co-founded, along with Alfred Fisk, the first major interracial, interdenominational church in the United States.