Patrick Henry: “Find the Peace so Sweet that You will Purchase it”

“Is life so dear or peace so sweet as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take, but as for me, give me liberty, or give me death!”
 
We all know Give me Liberty, or Give Me Death.” But what Patrick Henry’s rousing call points to is that our nation had to face either being killed and put down, in slavery and under the helm of another country…. or pay the price of being free.
 
We paid the price.  He did. Our forefathers, foremothers and forechildren all gave their lives… and so we have our own life today, in a beautiful and free country. 
 
What liberty will you fight for? What is so “dear and sweet” to you– that you must preserve for your future children?  
 
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Born in 1736, Patrick Henry became governor of Virginia and an American leader in the struggle for freedom. He also served in the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress. This quote came from a speech he gave in 1775 that appealed for citizens’ rights to bear arms. Patrick Henry dedicated his life to securing total freedom for the American people. He was instrumental in the adoption of the Bill of Rights so that individuals’ rights across America would be protected so that future generations would know freedom. 

Football Defensive End Michael Strahan: His Advice!

Everything they learned for the most part comes from you—how they treat people, how they look at the world, how they process things. I love being that example for them.

—Michael Strahan

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Football players are tough.

Picture him on the field in aggressive play,

 

(source: The New York Times)

and still in uniform with that tough look on his face!  

(source: Yahoo Sports)

They are also smart.  

(source: The New York Times)

Toughness and smarts, along with an overweighted amount of being loving, make a good model. Michael Strahan has a call to leadership for all of us, on the “field” and off.  

You are an example to your kids: how you treat a stranger at the dry-cleaners, if you jay walk, how you drive your kids to school.  You are a model at work—how you treat other employees, what you wear, the joy and intellect you bring to each meeting (not the stress). 

What we often forget is that you are also a model for yourself: how you treat yourself, and who you surround yourself with.  This includes the state of your home: disheveled, or with flowers (sometimes it is disheveled AND with flowers, which can be okay sometimes, too!).

Being a model for our kids, for our world, and for ourselves, sends a message. Love the process of being a great leader for everyone, and you will change the world, this moment.

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Michael Strahan is a retired American football defensive end who spent his fifteen-year career with the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL).  During his tenure with the Giants, Strahan set a record for the most sacks in a single season in 2001 and won a Super Bowl in his final season in 2007. After retiring from the NFL, Strahan became a media personality. He is currently a football analyst on Fox NFL Sunday and also serves as co-host on the television morning talk show, Live! with Kelly and Michael, alongside Kelly Ripa. He starred in and produced the short-lived Fox sitcom Brothers and appeared as host for Pros vs. Joes alongside fellow Fox football analyst Jay Glazer. On February 1, 2014, he was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Not Fear to Be Eccentric…” – Bertrand Russell

“Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.”
– Bertrand Russell

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Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician and mathematician.  He co-wrote “Prinicipia Mathematica” with A. N. Whitehead, attempting to ground math in logic, and he has had a profound influence on philosophy, mathematics and linguistics.  He was a staunch anti-war activist; he was jailed for pacifism in World War I, campaigned against Adolf Hitler, and was against the Vietnam War.  He also acknowledged that war could at times be the lesser of two evils, and supported World War II, in the interest of defeating Hitler as the larger threat.  Russell received a Nobel Prize in Literature, for writing championing freedom and humanitarian ideals.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Great Gift: “Call Me Brother”

A story I heard and found inspiring:

A famine was on in the land and a beggar on a street corner reached out to Tolstoy, who was passing by. Russia’s great man stopped, searched for a coin but found none. With genuine sorrow, he said: “Don’t be angry with me, my brother. I have nothing with me.”

The beggar’s face lit up as he replied, “But you called me brother–that is a great gift.”

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Soul Is the Core of Your Being” – Deepak Chopra

“The soul is the core of your being. Your body is in your soul. Your mind is in your soul. The whole universe is in your soul, and your soul is part of the universal consciousness.”
– Deepak Chopra, in an interview with Oprah

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Deepak Chopra is an India-born, American author and lecturer, focusing on spirituality and mind-body health.  He began his career as a doctor, before moving into alternative medicine.  He focuses on meditation and spiritual practices, and the effect of one’s thoughts and emotions on one’s physical health.  He is a prominent figure in the New Age movement, and the author of more than 65 books, including 19 New York Times bestsellers.  He has sold more than 20 million copies.  His books include “The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success”, “Buddha: A Story of Enlightenment”, and “Jesus: A Story of Enlightenment”.  Deepak and his wife, Rita, have been married for over 30 years, and they have two children.

 

Read Deepak’s full interview with Oprah here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: If We Center Down…What Is the Vital Part That Remains?

“…if we center down…and live in that holy Silence, which is dearer than life, and take our life program into the silent places of the heart, with complete openness, ready to do, ready to renounce according to His leading, then many of the things we are doing lose their vitality for us.”
– Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, Section: The Simplification of Life

What is absolutely vital in your life today?  Are you truly called to be doing what you’re doing…or is it simply your agenda?  Align your purpose with a divine motive…

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Thomas R. Kelly (1893-1941) was a Quaker educator and writer, with a focus on mysticism.  He graduated from Wilmington College, and studied at Hartford Theological Seminary with an interest in being a missionary.  During World War I, he joined the YMCA to work with the troops, and worked with German prisoners of war.  His pacifist position eventually lost him this position.  He returned to Hartford to complete his training, and married Lael Macy.  In the 1920s, Kelly and his wife went to Germany, where they were significant in founding a Quaker community.  He returned to Germany in 1938 to encourage Quakers living under Hitler.  Kelly taught at a number of universities throughout the 1930s.  His collection of writing, “A Testament of Devotion”, was published posthumously by a colleague.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself; he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”
–Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it.   To being honest with ourselves…and to overcoming the challenge.  We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.   With that honesty, as Goethe states, the criticism “will gradually yield to him.”

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network