Tag Archives: positivity

The Classic Pamela Positive: Tell Your Team They Are Great and DON’T Give Them Anything To Do 

 

One of the most powerful things you can do to recognize someone on your team is to call them and thank them and say Youre doing a wonderful job today, and I wanted to thank you. Thats it. I just wanted you to know, and for you to take the time to recognize it. Please know how much I appreciate your consistent work and positive attitude.” 

 

Thank You! Heart Text

 

Do not add on a to do.

I know thats tempting as we as CEOs have a lot we want to accomplish! But just let the conversation rest in genuine appreciation.

Its one of the best ways you can thank someone without agenda.

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Raj Vaishnaw on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

 

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second?

 

three woman sitting on table while talking

 

First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change.

Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

 

Photograph of Men Having Conversation Seating on Chair

 

Second then is body language. If our body is open, or hunched over, our shoulders upright or slumped, communicates a world of information! And yes, most significantly is your “face language.” A frown or a smile will tell all, and make or break someone’s day!

 

Two Woman in Black Sits on Chair Near Table

 

Third come the words. This is actually not our main way to communicate. For us, we must take care that tone and face and body communicate positivity. There are no words that will make up for a frown. 🙂

So yes, choose your words carefully and positively, and match them with a welcoming posture and smile.

Now, you are on your way to being a great communicator!

Communicate Positively,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Gradikaa Aggi on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Helena Lopes on Pexels

Fig³.  Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Find Out: How Do I Fit In Here?” – Heidi Klum

 

“You have to make things happen. There are bumps in the road: my agent, my weight, an industry looking for cool girls more than a commercial look. These are hurdles, and you have to find your way. You have to find out: How do I fit in here?”

― Heidi Klum

 

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This might look daunting, but there is a way up. This person found a way!

No matter what the challenge is you are facing, you will find a way to do so. We can learn, challenge ourselves, and believe.

Up You Go!

Pamela

 


Heidi Klum, born in 1973 in Germany, is a supermodel, actress, businesswoman, and television producer. She produces and hosts the award-winning reality television show Project Runway and has appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Elle, and Marie Claire. She became widely known after appearing as a Victoria’s Secret Angel because she was the first German model to become a Victoria Secret Angel. Heidi has also worked in philanthropy, specifically with Walk For Kids in 2011 and the American Red Cross. She has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, worked with H&M, and became the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009. Heidi is mother to four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Hu Chen on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving®. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me-and for my organization.

Keeping Balanced for Me, for You and Our Way of Giving Back to the World,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Vincent Delegge on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

 

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

 

chocolates

 

 

Yes, wisdom can come in chocolate!  Well, being vulnerable is important.  We show we care, show we want to learn, and grow in love.  We love the other person more and we love ourselves more.

 

Be Vulnerable, Grow, Love!

 

Pamela

 


Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking.  His other best-known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind.  His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature.  He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant.  He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English.  He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities.  In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell.  Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time.  He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.Photo by amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Light Trumps Darkness, Every Time” – Jodi Picoult

 

“There’s always going to be bad stuff out there. But here’s the amazing thing: Light trumps darkness, every time. You can stick a candle into the dark, but you can’t stick the dark into the light.”

— Jodi Picoult

 

 

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So then we must do the same. No matter how tough your situation is, you can light a candle. It may be small but it is enduring. Bring that light into your worry, and the light will dispel the darkness– and pave a way!

 

 

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I’m lighting my candle,

Pamela

 


Jodi Picoult is an American author with 14 million copies of her books in print worldwide. She wrote her first story at age 5, titled “The Lobster Which Misunderstood.” With a degree from Princeton University in writing and a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, Jodi took a variety of jobs before Nineteen Minutes became her first book to debut at #1 on the New York Times Best Seller list. In total, Jodi is the bestselling author of eighteen novels, five of which have been adapted for film and TV.

Jodi, her husband Tim and their three children live in Hanover, New Hampshire with two Springer spaniels, a rescue puppy, two donkeys, two geese, one duck, eight chickens, and the occasional Holstein.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Jack B on Unsplash

Fig². Paolo Nicolello on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

 

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We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

 

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Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

 

Singing,

Pamela


The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

Bio source: Wikipedia

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash