Tag Archives: positivity

The Classic Pamela Positive: To Have A Positive Mindset: Think About Building Your Mind As You Would Your Dream Home

 

When you build a home, you have to have a vision. A vision of what you would like to create. If you have a negative vision of your home then it certainly is not going to become a beautiful home! So we need to maintain that vision, even when the going gets rough. Even if you run out of brick. Even if the paint color didn’t match the way you wanted it to. Even if you have to fumigate!

Hold the vision, and keep striving for it.

 

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So what has helped me during tough times is not just to focus on the positive, but on gratitude. Even in tough times there is something to be grateful for. If you are having a hard time in sales and partnerships, perhaps you can be grateful you uplifted that potential client’s day with a positive smile or sincere compliment…

On an entirely different level… if a natural disaster has occurred, you can still be grateful that the sun came out, as in many countries pollution blocks the sun. That a friend is near. That people are caring and helping.

 

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Even in a crisis, and often especially in a crisis, the greatest goodness of people comes out. We can find the good even when we don’t seem ‘to have or own much.’ True wealth comes from qualities of being loving, kind, sincere, genuine, giving. And how wonderful — that that wealth is available to each one of us, every moment.

 


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Our Doubts Are Traitors.” – William Shakespeare

 

“Our doubts are traitors.”

– William Shakespeare

 

William Shakespere

 

Don’t let doubt into for your life, for it is not a friend. He is not your companion in any way. Would you go on a special walk with Doubt in the hills? Take Doubt to lunch? Get married to Doubt?

Then stop spending time with him  — especially in your mind.

 


William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 [baptized] – 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist and often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon”. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. His works and collaborations consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His numerous works include Hamlet, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, and Much Ado About Nothing. To this day his works have been repeatedly adopted, rediscovered, and reinterpreted in many contexts around the world. Europe, Africa, and the Middle East are all settings for Shakespeare’s plays. His plays are set in 12 countries.

At the age of eighteen, William married Anne Hathaway, a young woman from the village of Shottery, just outside Stratford-upon-Avon. William and Anne Shakespeare had three children. Susanna was born six months after their marriage, followed by twins Judith and Hamnet in 1585.
Bio Source: Wikipedia, British Council, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust  Fig¹. Royal Opera House on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Carry Our Weather Around With Us” – Stephen Covey

 

“We carry our weather around with us.”

—Stephen Covey

 

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What a wonderful encouragement from Stephen Covey. No matter if our day seems cloudy or rainy, either from the outside weather or from tough news or a challenging day, we determine our weather. 

 

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We establish the climate outlook of our minds, conversations… We shape the weather pattern of our communications; we forecast the rain, sun or clouds of our expectations. We are in charge of our own weather, and our weather determines our hopes for the future.

 

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Thank you, Stephen, for your life devoted to one of encouragement and positivity.

 


Stephen Covey was a professor and author, writer of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. His work focused primarily on leadership, family and living with principle. He was a professor at the Jon M. Huntsman School of Business at Utah State University.  When he was younger he played sports but an injury in his youth switched his focus from athletics to academics. He attended the University of Utah for his undergraduate degree and attended Harvard for his MBA. Although he earned his doctorate from Brigham Young University, he has also been awarded ten more honorary doctorates. He was also a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. In his spare time, he enjoyed cycling and giving keynote addresses. He and his wife, Sandra, have nine children and fifty-two grandchildren. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Marina Mazur on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Filip Zrnzević on Unsplash  Fig³.  Photo by  v2osk on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India ‘Namaste’ Means: I Honor The Place In You Of Love, Of Light, Of Truth, Of Peace.” -Ram Dass

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

-Ram Dass

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

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Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe, and love. The people in our lives are amazing. Be amazed.

Ram Dass teaches us to honor the divine in everyone, regardless of their background, religion, ethnicity, or thoughts. He’s practiced this at Harvard, India and all over, striving to bring peace to the world, person by person.

 

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So, who do you see the divine in today? Who amazes you today?

For me, it is my Mom. She is a great person, a great mom, a sincere friend a shining light of care for others. She is that peacegiver of divine love, loving others, all the time. Find someone who is your peacegiver and recognize them today. Thank you, dear Mom!

 


Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions. He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet. He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

Bio Sources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org  Fig¹. Photo by Nathan Cowley on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Kevin Noble on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have To Find Out: How Do I Fit In Here?” – Heidi Klum

 

“You have to make things happen. There are bumps in the road: my agent, my weight, an industry looking for cool girls more than a commercial look. These are hurdles, and you have to find your way. You have to find out: How do I fit in here?”

― Heidi Klum

 

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This might look daunting, but there is a way up. This person found a way!

No matter what the challenge is you are facing, you will find a way to do so. We can learn, challenge ourselves, and believe.

Up You Go!

Pamela

 


Heidi Klum, born in 1973 in Germany, is a supermodel, actress, businesswoman, and television producer. She produces and hosts the award-winning reality television show Project Runway and has appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Elle, and Marie Claire. She became widely known after appearing as a Victoria’s Secret Angel because she was the first German model to become a Victoria Secret Angel. Heidi has also worked in philanthropy, specifically with Walk For Kids in 2011 and the American Red Cross. She has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, worked with H&M, and became the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009. Heidi is a mother to four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Hu Chen on Unsplash

The Pamela Positive: “Go Instantly And Do The Thing” – Phillip Brooks

 

“If you could only know and see and feel, all of a sudden, that ‘the time is short,’ how it would break the spell. How you would go instantly and do the thing, which you might never have another chance to do!”

―Phillip Brooks

 

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There is no time to hesitate. Do you see a way that you can go good? Then we must do it now.

Slow down to help someone across the street.

I know it’s hard, but let someone in front of you on the highway.

Smile to someone who is waiting at the bus stop.

Save part of your dinner and bring it over to your neighbor, unexpectedly.

Be warm, be kind, even when you feel stressed.

 

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Time to do good now. You will find a way. Look and the opportunities abound to give back, give forward, give all around.  

Give Where We Can Today,

Pamela

 


Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 – January 23, 1893) was an American Episcopal clergyman and author, long the Rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and briefly Bishop of Massachusetts, and particularly remembered as the lyricist of the Christmas hymn, O Little Town of Bethlehem.

Born in Boston, Brooks was descended through his father, William Gray Brooks, from the Rev. John Cotton; through his mother, Mary Ann Phillips, he was a great-grandson of Samuel Phillips, Jr., founder of Phillips Academy (Andover, Massachusetts). Three of Brooks’ five brothers – Frederic, Arthur and John Cotton – were eventually ordained in the Episcopal Church. Phillips Brooks prepared for college at the Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard University in 1855 at the age of 20, where he was elected to the A.D. Club. He worked briefly as a school teacher at Boston Latin.

During the American Civil War, he upheld the cause of the North and opposed slavery, and his sermon on the death of Abraham Lincoln was an eloquent expression of the character of both men. His sermon at Harvard’s commemoration of the Civil War dead in 1865 likewise attracted attention nationwide. Brooks’s understanding of individuals and of other religious traditions gained a following across a broad segment of society, as well as increased support for the Episcopal Church. Within his lifetime, he received honorary degrees from Harvard (1877) and Columbia (1887), and the Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of Oxford, England (1885).

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Juliano Ferreira on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Belief Is A Wise Wager.” – Blaise Pascal

 

“Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation that He exists.”

– Blaise Pascal

 

Believing, about anything that is good, is the positive way forward in life.

 

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Believe in love.

Believe in nature and its calm healing power!

Believe in goodness.

Throw your weight into believing in anything good!

 

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Investing In Believing,

Pamela

 


Mathematician Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France. He was the third of four children and only son to Etienne and Antoinette Pascal. Etienne had decided to educate Blaise—a child prodigy—at home so he could design an unorthodox curriculum and made sure that Blaise was able to express his own innate curiosity. In the 1640s he invented the Pascaline, an early calculator, and further validated Evangelista Torricelli’s theory concerning the cause of barometrical variations. In the 1650s, Pascal laid the foundation of probability theory with Pierre de Fermat and published the theological work “Les Provinciales”, a groundbreaking series of letters that defended his Jansenist faith.

Pascal is also widely known for his body of notes posthumously released as the Pensées. Pascal’s inventions and discoveries have been instrumental to developments in the fields of geometry, physics and the computer science, influencing 17th-century visionaries like Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Isaac Newton.

Fig¹. Photo by Ben White on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Tetyana Kovyrina on Pexels