Tag Archives: positivity

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

 

 

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It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You’re Not Going To Have Control Over The Next Wave… So Face The Waves, Try To Catch One.” – Amy Poehler

 

 

The wave is coming no matter what… try to catch one and ride it.

 

“The sooner you realize that everything changes—that the things that happen to you are not you and that everything will be different all the time and you have such little control over the next wave, then you’ll just kind of stay in the moment, find your gravity, and be open to what’s coming. Just don’t turn your back on the wave—it’s coming no matter what; you can’t hide from it. So face the waves, try to catch one [and] ride it.”

–       Amy Poehler, actress, writer, co-founder of Smart Girls

 

Here’s a prolific comedian who helps us laugh every day. Through Parks & Recreation, she has more than 4.2 million viewers.1 With her funny and grounding character of Leslie Knope, she brings lightness, humor, and human pathos to us.

She’s also gone through challenges. She has two young sons and she’s divorced from her husband. It wasn’t in her plan; perhaps, this is one of the waves she is speaking about.

 

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She knows from life experience that you can’t control the next wave that’s coming to you. You have to stay in the moment. You have to ride it.

 

You have to be grounded even when you don’t know what the wave is going to do.   You don’t know whether you’re able to body surf……

 

 

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or if you’re going to be pummeled…

 

 

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or if you’re going to safely and beautifully ride through tunnel.

 

 

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Either way, we can’t hide from it.  Face the wave and try to enjoy what it teaches you. It will make you a better person.

 

I’m looking forward to my waves,

 

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Amy Poehler is an actress, comedian, and producer. She was born in Newton, Massachusetts and raised in Burlington, Massachusetts. Her parents were both teachers and she has one younger brother who is also an actor and producer. She attended Boston College, where she received her B.A. in media and communications. After college, she moved to Chicago where she would study improv comedy. She joined Saturday Night Live in 2001, where she would be the first woman to be promoted from featured guest to full cast member. After leaving SNL in 2008 to have her child, she would lead a new series, Parks and Recreation. For her role as Leslie Knope, she received numerous Emmy nominations for her role and help in writing many episodes. In 2014, she won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Television Series. She is an executive producer for the comedy series Broad City and Difficult People. In 2016, she won an Emmy Award for outstanding guest actress on SNL.

 

 

Citations:
1 Patten, Dominic, “ ‘Parks & Recreation’ Ratings Soar in Series Finale, ‘MasterChef Jr.’  & ‘Agent carter’ Finales Steady”, February 25, 2015, Deadlinehttps://deadline.com/2015/02/parks-and-recreation-ratings-series-finale-masterchef-jr-agent-carter-voice-ncis-nbc-1201381220/
Fig. 1: Photo by Holger Link on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Drew Farwell on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Debora Cardenas on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Jeremy Bishop on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Is Not Love Until Love’s Vulnerable” – Wisdom Inside a Chocolate Wrapper

“Love is not love until love’s vulnerable.” 

 

The Dream by Theodore Roethke,

as found on the inside of a Trader Joe’s chocolate bar wrapper

 

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Theodore Roethke (1908-1963) was an American poet who won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry, for his book The Waking.  His other best known books include The Lost Son, The Far Field, and Words for the Wind.  His poetry is noted for its rhythm, imagery and focus on nature. He grew up in Saginaw, Michigan and his father was a German immigrant. He received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Michigan for English. He went on to graduate school at Harvard College before he would leave to teach English at a number of universities. In 1953, Roethke married a former student, Beatrice O’Connell. Roethke is widely considered to be one of the most accomplished and influential poets of his time. He taught poetry at the University of Washington for many years and was highly regarded by his colleagues and students.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Find Out: How Do I Fit In Here?” – Heidi Klum

 

“You have to make things happen. There are bumps in the road: my agent, my weight, an industry looking for cool girls more than a commercial look. These are hurdles, and you have to find your way. You have to find out: How do I fit in here?”

– Heidi Klum

 

 

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This might look daunting, but there is a way up. This person found a way!

No matter what the challenge is you are facing, you will find a way to
do so.   We can learn, challenge ourselves, and believe.

Up you go!

Pamela

 


 

 

Heidi Klum, born in 1973 in Germany, is a supermodel, actress, businesswoman, and television producer. She produces and hosts the award-winning reality television show Project Runway and has appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Elle, and Marie Claire. She became widely known after appearing as a Victoria’s Secret Angel because she was the first German model to become a Victoria Secret Angel. Heidi has also worked in philanthropy, specifically with Walk For Kids in 2011 and the American Red Cross. She has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, worked with H&M, and became the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009. Heidi is mother to four children, ranging from ages 2-8.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?
 
Have faith, then take another step. 

 

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That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!
 
Love,
 
Pamela 
 
 

 


Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Clark Tibbs on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

 

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We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

 

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Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

Singing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

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The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

 

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving™. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me–and for my organization.