Tag Archives: Kindness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What Is My Life If I Am No Longer Useful To Others” – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

“What is my life if I am no longer useful to others?” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

 

If you have ever lacked purpose, or feel out of alignment, know your life has purpose.  You don’t have to wait to find it.

 

The whole purpose of Life, and your life, is to bring some sort of goodness to the world.

 

 

man wearing white top using MacBook

 

 

Yes, it’s that simple. You might get a Ph.D. and profoundly change how renewable energy powers our communities. But you might also simply smile peacefully and joyously to all that come your way.

 

Both change the world.  One is immediate, one is long-term.

 

The point is your life can and must be useful to others.

 

Stop the boredom, the frustration, the hurt. Your life is needed now. Give your smile and devote your life to doing good. Goethe got it right!

 

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was one of the rare giants of world literature. Throughout a long and full life, he demonstrated his prolific genius in many different areas. Goethe was born August 28, 1749, in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany, to a wealthy, middle-class family. He was educated at home by his father and tutors until he went to Leipzig to study law. Following his university graduation, Goethe returned to Frankfurt. His mind was filled with many exciting ideas, and he devoted himself to philosophical studies. It was here that he wrote his first important metrical drama and then the superb short novel. These aroused widespread interest and admiration.

On his return to Germany Goethe lived in a state of semi-retirement and concentrated on his studies, writing and cultivate his wide interests. In 1806 Goethe married a woman who was his mistress for many years, and had a son in 1789. As the years passed he became acquainted with many of the most prominent men of his time and was highly regarded by all. Napoleon Bonaparte was among his most famous admirers and remarked when they first met, “Vous êtes un homme,” (You are a man). By the time of his death, Goethe had attained a position of unprecedented esteem in the literary and intellectual circles. Because of the breadth of his thought, his comprehension of human nature and optimistic faith in the human spirit, and his intuitive grasp of universal truths, Goethe is regarded by many as the outstanding poet of the modern world. He died March 22, 1832, but his work lives in its meaning and value for modern day readers.

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹. Tim Gouw on Unsplush

The Classic Pamela Positive: “If It Is Right, It Happens…Nothing Good Gets Away” – John Steinbeck

 

 

Heartfelt advice is such wonderful wealth.   And its even more meaningful when its in a letter, which someone took the time to write, and shape with their own beautiful language, handwriting and style. 

 

 

person about to write on white printer paperr

 

 

This is one of my favorites, between a father and a son. John Steinbeck wrote to his son about the meaning of love.  I really dont need to say anything else.

 

 

person holding bouquet of flower

 

 

Enjoy this sincere, kind wisdom. I almost feel its warmth emanating from the pagesof care, of experience, of hope, of trust.  May we all trust love.

 

 

“Love…is an outpouring of everything good in you–of kindness, and consideration and respect–not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable…[This] can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had…And don’t worry about losing.  If it is right, it happens–the main thing is not to hurry.  Nothing good gets away.” 

John Steinbeck, to his son Thom

 

 


 

John Steinbeck was a Nobel Prize-winning author, whose most famous works include The Grapes of Wrath, East of Eden, and Of Mice and Men. 

Born in 1902, Steinbeck grew up in a small city in Monterey County in California, the son of German immigrants. The community was extremely rural and he worked with migrants on a farm. He later said that this taught him about the struggles of migrant life and the potentially bad aspects of human nature. In 1919, he went on to study English Literature at Stanford University. He later left without graduating and he would struggle to find jobs to support him while writing. In 1942, he met and married Gywndolyn Conger and they had two sons together. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize for Literature. Steinbecks works often addressed social issues such as ecology, cultural standards and the condition of laborers.

BioSource: Wikipedia

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Neven Krcmarek on Unsplash
Fig². Amy Shamblen on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Mahatma Gandhi Teaches Us: To Be…Love and Change, Start with You Now

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

– Mahatma Gandhi

 

The key word here from one of our greatest leaders is ‘be.’ Every day we have a chance to be. And the most important being is loving. Being kind, gracious, and helping others. That can start today. We can and should whisk away frustration, for every moment of frustration is one not spent on being the positive force we hope to be. What type of foundation are you building? One that crumbles from exhaustion and disbelief, cynicism? Or one of solidity, brick, by brick, with each brick contributing Principle, Love, Kindness, Grace, Strength, Truth, Joy…? As Gandhi says… the other key word here is ‘you.’ No one can do this for you. Not your partner, your parents, your best friend or your spouse.  You… are the being.

 

 


 

 

Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Thoughts on Kindness and Battle

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle.”

 

 

statue-756624_1280

 

This quote is often attributed to Philo of Alexandria. Philo was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived from 20 BC to 50 AD. This quote is also sometimes cited to Plato, a classical Greek philosopher who was the student of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle.

 

I received this great quote from a wonderful academic leader at USC, Warren Bennis. I was sharing my mission and values with Dr. Bennis, and he provided this quote as helpful guidance.

 

I met Dr. Bennis when I was inducted into his leadership institute while getting my masters in communications. His demeanor is warm, kind, astute and constantly open to new trends and progress in our society. Dr. Bennis, thank you for this meaningful quote!

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Be A Family That Gives Back, Part Two

 

This is part two of our series on giving with your family. You can read part one here!

 

When you share giving with others, as a lesson, an inspiration, and as a humble manifestation of good, you are helping the world. You are helping other members of your family see good taking place.

Read on to hear more tips on how your family can give together during the holiday season. Please share with us what you did!

3. Make A Statement

Now, you’re ready to allow your young ones to make a statement. And they might not be young ones? Many of us live in larger families or blended families. Perhaps everyone gets an “allowance” to do good, not just teens.

 

 

sharon-mccutcheon-556371-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

4. Give Your Time

Perhaps one of the most precious things in our busy, Silicon Valley and global world is our time. How we spend it makes a statement. Are you volunteering? It’s great to take your time to do this with other family members.

You might see dad go to be a banker in the morning or go to work at Bapco construction on the street. But when you’re volunteering, you’re all working together, replanting the garden, or serving meals to homeless individuals. By giving back together, everyone is doing the same thing to create a greater good. And it’s been proven if your family volunteers together, “the children felt cheered up,” and they “respected their parents more.”2 Those are two great, family bonding reasons!

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

 

val-vesa-624638-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

So get out there and volunteer and be a stronger family.

I hope these have helped you understand how to live a more impactful life and how to truly give. It’s not just about

 

 

rawpixel-570908-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

It’s about the

 

 

jon-tyson-762642-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Let’s Be Living And Giving,

Pamela

 

 


 

Citations:
1Fabbri, Briana, “Allowance in America: When, Why & How Much We Pay Our Kids”, NetCredit, published on September 11, 2013,https://www.netcredit.com/blog/allowance-in-america/
2 Littlepage, Laura, “Family Volunteering: An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Families”, Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, 2003, https://archives.iupui.edu/bitstream/handle/2450/438/31_03-C05_Family_Volunteering.pdf?sequence=1
Fig. 6: Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash
Fig. 7: Photo by Val Vesa on Unsplash
Fig. 8: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 9: Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I don’t think you ever stop giving.” —Oprah Winfrey

 

  “I don’t think you ever stop giving. I really don’t. I think it’s an on-going process. And it’s not just about being able to write a check. It’s being able to touch somebody’s life.”

—Oprah Winfrey

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-08-30 at 4.46.43 PM.png

 

That’s what we are all here to do: Touch someone’s life today.  

Stop what you are doing, look up, and care about someone today. That might be the window washer, the barista at Peet’s, your mom, or the building manager.

 

Screen Shot 2018-08-30 at 4.46.58 PM.png

 

 

Everyone needs care, love, and attention. Touch someone’s life, right now.

How will you do it?

Touch a Life,

Pamela​

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-08-30 at 4.47.11 PM

 


Oprah Gail Winfrey was born on an isolated farm in Kosciusko, Mississippi, on January 29, 1954. Winfrey’s unmarried parents separated soon after she was born and left her in the care of her maternal grandmother on the farm. The poor, urban lifestyle had its negative effect on Winfrey as a young teenager. Winfrey said her father saved her life. He was very strict and provided her with guidance, structure, rules, and books. Winfrey became an excellent student.

Winfrey became Miss Black Nashville and Miss Tennessee. The Nashville Columbia Broadcasting System affiliate offered her a job; Winfrey turned it down twice, but finally took the advice of a speech teacher, who reminded her that job offers from CBS were “the reason people go to college.” Winfrey was Nashville’s first African American female co-anchor of the evening news. Her emotional ad-lib delivery eventually got her transferred to the daytime talk show arena, and after boosting a third-rated local Chicago talk show to first place, she launched her own production company and became internationally syndicated. By the mid-1990’s, she had reinvented her show with a focus on literature, self-improvement, and spirituality. Though criticized for unleashing a confession culture, promoting controversial self-help ideas, and an emotion-centered approach, she is often praised for overcoming adversity to become a benefactor to others.

Winfrey’s The Oprah Winfrey Show was hugely successful. It was broadcasted in 145 countries and had an average of 233,000 viewers in 2016. When her show first began, her audience was 55 percent larger than that of her closest competitors. Since its creation in 2000, O, The Oprah Magazine has become one of the most successful titles of the periodical press, its print run copies exceeding 2 million.

 

Photo credit: Pamela Littky for VARIETY

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

 

 

woman-591576_1280

 

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best.  You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 

 


 

 

John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach.  He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children.  After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.