Tag Archives: calm

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

“Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!”

-John Greenleaf Whittier

 

tree on body of water near mountains

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a bit of calm. See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery. After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind. Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Famous People


Fig¹.  Photo by Ken Cheung on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Fight, You Try Your Best, But If You Lose, You Don’t Have To Break Five Racquets.” – Rafael Nadal

 

 

“You fight, you try your best, but if you lose, you don’t have to break five racquets and smash up the locker room. You can do those things, but when you’re finished, nothing’s changed. You’ve still lost. If something positive came from that, I probably would do it. But I see only negativity.”

— Rafael Nadal

 

 

nadal 1 (1) (1).jpg

 

 

What an outstanding leadership statement. We all have times that something challenging happens. Do you tear around, pull your hair out, snap at someone?

 

What will you do? Spend your anger until you are tired. It’s all about you and you expressing anger.

 

 

roberto-salinas-621916-unsplash (1) (1)

 

 

Turn away to a calmer state, one that benefits all. Remember, you are a leader to others. Everyone is.

 

Everyone is a leader to someone, simply by our daily actions. So if that business partnership doesn’t come through, do you slam the door? Or do you sit down calm with your team, thank them for their efforts, and discuss lessons learned? If you didn’t win the election, do you set the stage on fire? Or do you rally the troupes and thank them for all their efforts and have a come-together-let’s-appreciate-all-our-work-together dinner?

 

Losing is an attitude. Not an action.

There actually is no loss. That’s in your mind.

So take the lessons learned, and have a winning mind.

 

 

rawpixel-706373-unsplash (1)

 

 

Even if you didn’t win, you still won knowledge. You learned how to do something better! Share that with yourself and the team. Celebrate that next victory for you know you are going out on court to do better the next time!

 

Smashing rackets wastes time. It deletes reflection. It’s no model for others up and coming in the world.

 

Hold your head high humbly proud about your effort. You did your best.   Then, listen, learn and keep going higher!

 

No Smashing,

Pamela

 

 


Rafael Nadal was born in Mallorca, Spain, on June 3, 1986. When he was 3 years old, his uncle, Toni Nadal, a former professional tennis player, started working with him, seeing an aptitude for the sport in young Rafael. At the age of 8, Nadal won an under-12 regional tennis championship, giving Uncle Toni the incentive to step up his training. When Nadal was just 12 years old, he won the Spanish and European tennis titles in his age group. He turned professional at age 15. At the age of 19, in 2005, Nadal won the French Open the first time he competed in the tournament, and his world ranking shot to No. 3. With his powerful topspin-heavy shots, speed and mental toughness, Nadal reigned as one of the “Big Four” of men’s tennis (along with Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray) for the next several years. In 2010, he was triumphant at the French Open and Wimbledon, and his subsequent win at the U.S. Open made him just the second men’s player to achieve the career Golden Slam—victories at all four majors, as well as Olympic gold.

The 2016 season, after suffering a first-round loss at the Australian Open in January, he rebounded to win titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona. However, Nadal’s attempts to play through a nagging wrist injury took its toll, and he was forced to pull out of his favorite tournament, the French Open, after two rounds. Nadal took part in Thailand’s “A Million Trees for the King” project, planting a tree in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on a visit to Hua Hin during his Thailand Open 2010.

Outside of tennis, Nadal is close with his parents and younger sister, María Isabel. He has a deep love for football and supports Real Madrid. In 2007, he founded Fundación RafaNadal to support young adults and children. Since then, he’s also created a tennis academy for disadvantaged children called “Anantapur Sports Village”.


Citations:
Fig¹.  Retrieved from Carine06 on Flickr
Fig².  Photo by Robert Salinas on Unsplash
Fig³.  Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Big Lesson In Life, Baby, Is Never Be Scared Of Anyone Or Anything.” – Frank Sinatra

 

 

“The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.”

— Frank Sinatra

 

 

 

 

Many of us wish we could say that. 🙂  If we are trusting and calm in our thoughts, then we truly cannot be scared of anyone, or anything.

 

 


Frank Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and film actor. Beginning his musical career in the swing era as a boy singer with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra found unprecedented success as a solo artist from the early to mid-1940s after being signed by Columbia Records in 1943 and released his first album The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946.  He later signed with Capitol Records in 1953 until he left Capitol in 1961 to find his own record label Reprise Records.  Among the albums he released are Come Fly with Me, Nice ‘n’ Easy, and Sinatra at the Sands.  His film credits include From Here to Eternity (won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), The Man with the Golden Arm (nominated for the Best Actor Oscar), The Manchurian Candidate, Guys and Dolls, and High Society.

Sinatra had three children, Nancy, Frank Jr., and Tina, all with his first wife, Nancy Sinatra (née Barbato) (m. 1939–1951). He was married three more times, to actresses Ava Gardner (m. 1951–1957), Mia Farrow (m. 1966–1968) and finally to Barbara Marx (m. 1976–1998; his death).

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.  Wikimedia

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Home Should Be

 

 

Home is so many things, to so may people. What should a Home be?

 

A Home Should Be Inspiring. 

 

All the objects in your home should reinforce your values and character.  Home should be a respite of calm and peace, and a reflection of who you are.

 

 

white house under maple trees

 

 

A Home Should Demonstrate Moderation. 

 

 

white wooden kitchen island and cupboard cabinets near glass panel door

 

 

A Home Should Have People Who are Loving and Kind.

 

 

A home should have balance. 

 

 

white kitchen table

 

 

The best homes reflect a sense of balance within the spaces, allowing for different types of activities.  Some may be more energetic, others which are more peaceful.

 

 

A Home Should Reflect You, What Is Right For You.

 

 

white and red concrete house

 

 

Finally,

A Home Should Be Something You Carry Everywhere.

 

 

3 women sitting on bench near the flowers

 

 

I Am Grateful for My Home and Your Home Today,

Pamela

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Scott Webb on Unsplash

Fig². Jason Briscoe on Unsplash

Fig³. Le Creuset on Unsplash

Fig⁴. Hugo Sousa on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Fight, You Try Your Best, But If You Lose, You Don’t Have To Break Five Racquets.” – Rafael Nadal

 

“You fight, you try your best, but if you lose, you don’t have to break five racquets and smash up the locker room. You can do those things, but when you’re finished, nothing’s changed. You’ve still lost. If something positive came from that, I probably would do it. But I see only negativity.”

– Rafael Nadal

 

 

nadal 1 (1) (1).jpg

 

 

What an outstanding leadership statement. We all have times that something challenging happens. Do you tear around, pull your hair out, snap at someone?

What will you do? Spend your anger until you are tired. It’s all about you and you expressing anger.

 

 

roberto-salinas-621916-unsplash (1) (1)

 

 

Turn away to a calmer state, one that benefits all. Remember, you are a leader to others. Everyone is.

 

Everyone is a leader to someone, simply by our daily actions. So if that business partnership doesn’t come through, do you slam the door? Or do you sit down calm with your team, thank them for their efforts, and discuss lessons learned? If you didn’t win the election, do you set the stage on fire? Or do you rally the troupes and thank them for all their efforts and have a come-together-let’s-appreciate-all-our-work-together dinner?

 

Losing is an attitude. Not an action.

There actually is no loss. That’s in your mind.

So take the lessons learned, and have a winning mind.

 

 

rawpixel-706373-unsplash (1)

 

 

Even if you didn’t win, you still won knowledge. You learned how to do something better! Share that with yourself and the team. Celebrate that next victory for you know you are going out on court to do better the next time!

 

Smashing rackets wastes time. It deletes reflection. It’s no model for others up and coming in the world.

 

Hold your head high humbly proud about your effort. You did your best.   Then, listen, learn and keep going higher!

No smashing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Rafael Nadal was born in Mallorca, Spain, on June 3, 1986. When he was 3 years old, his uncle, Toni Nadal, a former professional tennis player, started working with him, seeing an aptitude for the sport in young Rafael. At the age of 8, Nadal won an under-12 regional tennis championship, giving Uncle Toni the incentive to step up his training. When Nadalwas just 12 years old, he won the Spanish and European tennis titles in his age group. He turned professional at age 15. At the age of 19, in 2005, Nadal won the French Open the first time he competed in the tournament, and his world ranking shot to No. 3. With his powerful topspin-heavy shots, speed and mental toughness, Nadal reigned as one of the “Big Four” of men’s tennis (along with Federer, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray) for the next several years. In 2010, he was triumphant at the French Open and Wimbledon, and his subsequent win at the U.S. Open made him just the second men’s player to achieve the career Golden Slam—victories at all four majors, as well as Olympic gold.

 

The 2016 season, after suffering a first-round loss at the Australian Open in January, he rebounded to win titles in Monte Carlo and Barcelona. However, Nadal’s attempts to play through a nagging wrist injury took its toll, and he was forced to pull out of his favorite tournament, the French Open, after two rounds. Nadal took part in Thailand’s “A Million Trees for the King” project, planting a tree in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej on a visit to Hua Hin during his Thailand Open 2010.

 

Outside of tennis, Nadal is close with his parents and younger sister, María Isabel. He has a deep love for football and supports Real Madrid. In 2007, he founded Fundación RafaNadal to support young adults and children. Since then, he’s also created a tennis academy for disadvantaged children called “Anantapur Sports Village”.


Citations:
Fig. 1: Retrieved from Carine06 on Flickr
Fig. 2: Photo by Robert Salinas on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

 “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

 

 

 

sea-dawn-sunset-cloudy

 

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

 

– John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a
bit of calm.  See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind.  Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Belief Is A Wise Wager.”- Blaise Pascal

“Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager, then, without hesitation that He exists.”   

        – Blaise Pascal

 

Believing, about anything that is good, is the positive way forward in life.

 

 

ben-white-692414-unsplash (1)

 

 

Believe in love.

 

Believe in nature and its calm healing power!

 

Believe in goodness.

 

Throw your weight into believing in anything good!

 

 

rachel-pfuetzner-608791-unsplash (1)

 

 

Investing in Believing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Mathematician Blaise Pascal was born on June 19, 1623, in Clermont-Ferrand, France. He was the third of four children and only son to Etienne and Antoinette Pascal. Etienne had decided to educate Blaise—a child prodigy—at home so he could design an unorthodox curriculum and make sure that Blaise was able to express his own innate curiosity. In the 1640s he invented the Pascaline, an early calculator, and further validated Evangelista Torricelli’s theory concerning the cause of barometrical variations. In the 1650s, Pascal laid the foundation of probability theory with Pierre de Fermat and published the theological work “Les Provinciales”, a groundbreaking series of letters that defended his Jansenist faith.

 

Pascal is also widely known for his body of notes posthumously released as the Pensées. He died in Paris on August 19, 1662. He was 39 years old. Pascal’s inventions and discoveries have been instrumental to developments in the fields of geometry, physics and computer science, influencing 17th-century visionaries like Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz and Isaac Newton.

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Ben White on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rachel Pfuetzner on Unsplash