Tag Archives: religion

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Your Daily Life Is Your Temple And Your Religion. When You Enter Into It Take With You Your All.” – Khalil Gibran

 

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

 

So how can we do that?

 

white mosque on daytime

 

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Rohan Iyer on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

―Proverbs 19:11 (New International Version)

 

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay. Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

man opening his arms wide open on snow covered cliff with view of mountains during daytime

 

It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 


Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16. The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech. The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Proverbs


Fig¹.  Photo by Jason Hogan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

 

 

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It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

 “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

 

 

 

sea-dawn-sunset-cloudy

 

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

 

– John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a
bit of calm.  See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind.  Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do All the Good You Can” —John Wesley

 

“Do all the good you can
By all the means you can
In all the ways you can
In all the places you can
At all the times you can
To all the people you can
As long as ever you can.”
—John Wesley

 

 

 

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John Wesley (1703-1791) was the founder of the Methodist movement, along with his brother Charles. Wesley went to Christ Church College, Oxford, and taught at Oxford’s Lincoln College.  He preached in Georgia, and throughout England, giving over 40,000 sermons in his lifetime.  One of Wesley’s best-known doctrines is that of “salvation by faith.”  He also emphasized striving for “Christian Perfection,” where the believer lived by the love of God.  He was engaged with social issues such as prison reform and the abolitionist movement.  Methodism is now considered a separate denomination of Christianity, although in Wesley’s lifetime it was within the Anglican church.  At the time of Wesley’s death, there were 135,000 Methodists; today, they number some 70 million.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Your Daily Life Is Your Temple And Your Religion. When You Enter Into It Take With You Your All.” – Khalil Gibran

 

Everyday we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

 

So how can we do that?

taj-mahal-366_1280

 

 

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings.In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

-Proverbs 19:11 (New International Version)

 

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay.  Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

 

kinga-cichewicz-601658-unsplash.jpg

 

 

It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another Act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 

 


 

 

Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16.  The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech.  The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Verse background source: Wikipedia: Proverbs