Tag Archives: religion

The Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

“Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

– John Greenleaf Whittier

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John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

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“Your daily life is your temple and your religion. When you enter into it take with you your all.” -Khalil Gibran-

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Everyday we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,”Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

So how can we do that?

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love to you today as you build your special temple,

Pamela

 

 

 

Biography

Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings.

In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

The Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

“Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

– John Greenleaf Whittier

6768_b_7864.jpg

John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Classic Pamela Positive: A Common Mistake is For Someone to Believe That They Can Love, but at the Same Time Have a Grudge. They Fool Themselves.

“A common mistake is for someone to believe that they can love God but at the same time have a grudge, resentment or ill will towards some fellow men. They fool themselves.

Christian Science Sentinel

Love is pure.

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Love loves, and must do so as a flowing current…

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If you have resentment, it obstructs the river.

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If you have ill will, you can even stop the river.

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So go heal yourself now.

Not someone else. Yourself.

You can’t change anyone else, and you can’t change the past. Neither of those are roles given to you by God, nature or any other power.

So stop taking responsibility for judging someone else. No one asked you to be the judge.

Instead, heal your own mind. Release the past, release this individual, and you will be free. And your heart will heal, be filled and flow.

And the river flows lovingly on….

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The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

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       “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

– John Greenleaf Whittier

***

John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

Top Thing You Must Do When You Think/Hear Something Negative

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“The Buddha has a very beautiful metaphor… He calls it “like writing on water.” Whenever an unwholesome thought or emotion arises in an enlightened mind, it is like writing on water; the moment it is written, it disappears.”

– Chade Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself, The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace)

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Gloomy Christians?

Pope Francis 4“Christians are joyful; they are never gloomy. God is at our side…Jesus has shown us that the face of God is that of a loving Father. Sin and death have been defeated. Christians cannot be pessimists! If we are truly in love with Christ and if we sense how much he loves us, our hearts will ‘light up’ with a joy that spreads to everyone around us.”

— Pope Francis

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