Tag Archives: joy

The Classic Pamela Positive: Why You Should Sit by an Older Man

 

Now that might sound funny, but the other day I felt called to sit by an older man.

We were at a community gathering, celebrating an organist for all her church music. 

She had performed beautifully over many years and she was a lovely person. We had contributed goodies and a potluck, and a celebratory cake. People were laughing, chatting and sharing memories. It was a wonderful sense of togetherness, that we often miss in our social media society.

 

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But on the couch was an older man. He didn’t look down, he didn’t look up, he was just sitting there. I asked a friend who he was.

“He’s the father of one of our members here, and he’s blind.”

 

I thought what that must feel like.

He’s in a sea of people and conversation….and no one’s talking to him…..

yet he hears everything.

It must be a big loud jumble… but nothing specifically directed towards him…… My heart went out to him.

 

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I went right away over to the couch and sat down with him. I held his hand and said,

 

“I’m Pamela! Who are you? Are you having a nice day?”

 

His eyes perked up and he continued to look ahead. His face crinkled with a smile. He proceeded to tell me, with very joyous terms, about who he was, his life, and fascinating stories of history. He remembered the time when the Korean War was mentioned in school as well as when World War II was being announced. What prolific, historical events to be a youngster and to hear this global and national news. So monumental, so devastating.

 

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He had many fascinating stories to tell about his childhood, about the importance of his aunt, his mom’s sister, and how devoted she was to church and community.

I listened, listened, listened.

We had such a joyous time.

Having our quiet time of sharing, amidst a joyous gathering.

In our lives, that’s all that really needs to be done is to listen, listen, listen, listen with love, listen with your heart.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has a story to tell. And so we listen.

 

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What yours? If you want your story to be heard, if you want to be known… then take some time to listen. Take time to listen to someone else’s story. You will learn; they will love you for it. You both will be enriched and, in this case, a blind man’s eyes opened my blind eyes.

I Want to Hear Your Story,

Pamela


Fig¹. Photo by Huy Phan on Unsplash Fig².  Photo by Rhand Mccoy on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Toa Heftiba on Unsplash Fig⁴.  Photo by Alex Holyoake on Unsplash  Fig⁵. Photo by Mimi Thian on Unsplash

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Smile at a Stranger, and the Important Reason Why”

 

“Walk down the street and smile at a stranger. He’ll smile at the next stranger passing by, and then the whole street is smiling. And no one knows why.” 

-Juliana Margulies

 

woman sitting in front of brown wooden table

 

I love this quote. The only reason why we need to smile… is simply to give joy. Give joy to ourselves and to others… it’s one of our main reasons for being. And while people may not know why you are smiling, they’ll soon find out. It makes the world go around with peacefulness, graciousness and loving kindness. That’s reason enough. 🙂

 


Juliana Margulies is an American actress who achieved success as a regular character on ER, for which she received an Emmy. She grew up in New York, the youngest daughter of Jewish immigrants. Her mother was a teacher and her father was a philosopher and Madison Avenue advertising executive. More recently, she took the lead role in The Good Wife, and has received a Golden Globe and two Screen Actors Guild awards. Margulies attended Sarah Lawrence College, where she appeared in a few college plays. In 2007, she married to Keith Lieberthal, and they have one son together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Brooke Cagle on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

 

Girl Wearing Blue Denim Dress Shirt

 

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it. It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us. It need not be a big event. It can be small gratitude.

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere. Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line. It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

 


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish until shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyrics he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe formally married Christiane Vulpius in October 1806. He was opposed to the church ceremony that was, at the time, the only way of being legally married, so, although she bore Goethe a son, August, in 1789, he didn’t marry her until the Napoleonic army sacked the city in which they lived.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Weimar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honor of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

BioSource: The Literature Network  Fig¹. nappy on Pexels  Fig². Caleb Jones on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Most Positive Things You Can Say

 

Here are the top things you can say to make a relationship work, from All There Is:

 

You look great.

Can I help?

Let’s eat out.

I was wrong.

I am sorry.

I love you.

Dave Isay

 

man and woman smiling

 

Say Something Positive Today!!

Pamela


All There Is by Dave Isay grew from the StoryCorps initiative, a project to record the oral histories of individuals. StoryCorps has collected stories from more than 75,000 people, in an attempt to record the history of people who rarely appear in history books. In 2010, Isay published another book from StoryCorps stories, Mom: A Celebration of Mothers from StoryCorps. All There Is celebrates love, with heartwarming stories from real couples. Leroy A. Morgan contributed the list quoted above.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Alesia Kazantcevas on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Smile Is a Blessing” – Mpho Tutu

 

“A smile is a blessing…It really doesn’t take that much to live into our blessing and make the world better for each person we encounter during our day.”

-Mpho Tutu

 

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This quote is from Mpho Tutu, the daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and an ordained minister herself.

She was quoted in the Christian Science Sentinel, in an article discussing her and her father’s new book, Made for Goodness. She also said that they hope the book will help people to “recognize in themselves their own innate goodness.”

How can we each be a blessing to another person today?

How can you share your goodness today?

How can you share your smile?

 

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It’s really a life calling to spread our innate goodness ― and it’s infinite.

 


The Reverend Mpho A. Tutu, an Episcopal priest, is the founder and Executive Director of the Tutu Institute for Prayer & Pilgrimage. Ms. Tutu has run ministries for children in the downtown Worcester, Massachusetts; for rape survivors in Grahamstown, SA; and for refugees from South Africa and Namibia at the Phelps Stokes Fund in New York City. She earned her MDiv from Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts and began her ordained ministry at Historic Christ Church in Alexandria, Virginia. Ms. Tutu is married to Joseph Burris; they have two daughters, Nyaniso and Onalenna.

Bio Source: The Tutu Institute for Prayer & Pilgrimage Official Website
Fig¹. Photo by Adrianna Van Groningen on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Matheus Ferrero on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Happy Woman…or a Cheerful Woman

 

“A happy woman is one who has no
cares at all; a cheerful woman is one who
has cares but doesn’t let them get her down.”

— Beverly Sills

 

We all go through troubles. That doesn’t mean it wrecks our day. It doesn’t color every moment!  Beverly Sills, one of our most prolific singers in the world, maintained a positive attitude dispite the challenges.

 

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Be cheery and filled with good wishes for all, including yourself.

The world is so tough, but you can be a flower spreading light and joy. Let your cheer spread….the world needs you.

No matter how tough Beverly Sills’s life was, she continued to deliver cheer. She was one of our most prolific singers, and she just sang with cheer and excellence again and again.

We all can use some cheer. Start with you. See the good, emphasize the good and we go forward on that plane of cheer. No matter the challenges, cheer will buy you higher.

Beverly Sills was a world-class musician and vocal artist. She supported the arts and helped bring some of the musical institutions back to financial viability, such as City Opera. It faced extreme financial troubles and was the hardest hit during the AIDS crisis. They lost dozens of valuable conductors, musicians, singers and operations people. They were hit hard financially, and heart-wise.

 

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But Beverly Sills used her influence, financial power, personality and knowledge of music to turn around their future. It looked hopeless – and she made it full of hope! She brought cheer back through her cheery personality and expectation of good. 

 

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The sun still shines, even when covered by a cloud. It’s still there. So is your happiness. So is your joy. Sometimes it seems covered a bit, and then, we rediscover it in a more resplendent, beautiful way.

I’m Going Forward with Cheerfulness for You and Me,

Pamela


Beverly Sills was a singer and opera star. She was born Belle Miriam Silverman on May 25, 1929, in Brooklyn, New York. A gifted soprano, Sills was one of America’s most famous opera performers. At the age of three, she won a radio contest and soon began singing on the radio regularly as Bubbles Silverman. Sills studied opera with a voice coach as a child, and made her operatic debut in 1947 at the Philadelphia Civic Opera. After years of trying, Beverly Sills achieved her dream of singing with the New York City Opera in 1955. She played the role of Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus, earning strong reviews. After taking some time away from the stage to handle family matters, she returned stronger than ever in the 1966 New York City Opera production of Handel’s Julius Caesar.

During her long career, Beverly Sills received many honors, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980. She has written books about her life, including 1987’s Beverly: An Autobiography. She was married to journalist Peter B. Greenough from 1956 until his death in 2006. The couple had two children together. In her retirement, Beverly Sills continued a life of charitable work, notably as a longtime chairwoman of the board of trustees of the March of Dimes.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹: Judith Grossman on Unsplush  Fig²: Claude-Pascal Perna on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: “All the Other Things We Think Make Us Happy Are Actually Just Ways of Getting More Family and Friends.” – Daniel Todd Gilbert

 

“We are happy when we have family, we are happy when we have friends and almost all the other things we think make us happy are actually just ways of getting more family and friends.”

– Daniel Todd Gilbert

 

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Let’s be grateful for all the happiness in our lives today. To truly cherish family, call a long-lost friend, or spend less time on work — and more time on someone.  

All the ‘someones’ in our lives are what give us joy. Appreciate!

Love,

Pamela

 


Daniel Todd Gilbert (born November 5, 1957) is Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He is a social psychologist known for his research (with Timothy Wilson of the University of Virginia) on affective forecasting, with a special emphasis on cognitive biases such as the impact bias. Gilbert authored Stumbling on Happiness, which won the 2007 Royal Society Prizes for Science Books, adding to his list of numerous awards for his teaching and research. A high school dropout at age 19, he aspired to be a science fiction writer but when a creative writing class he wanted to take was full he took up psychology instead at University of Colorado Denver and Princeton University. He also wrote essays that appeared in The New York Times and TIME, among others, and penned short stories that were published in Amazing Stories, Isaac Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine and many other magazines and anthologies. He is the co-writer and host of the NOVA television series This Emotional Life. He and his wife Marilynn Oliphant live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by mentatdgt on Pixeles