Tag Archives: change

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Want The Whole Person.” – D. J. Depree

 

“Henry Ford said, “bring us your hands, and you can leave everything else at home.” D.J. rejected that idea and said completely the opposite: “I want all of you here. I want the whole person.”

- J. Kermit Campbell

 

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Campbell continues, “If I can have 5,000 or 6,000 people who are passionate about what they do…solving problems and finding solutions to our customers’ problems, I’m going to be much better off than if I leave that to 10% of that population, who tell the other people what to do. It’s like a sports team: you can have one or two guys who play well, but if you can get 50 guys on a team all playing at a very high level, you’re very tough to beat.  That’s always been our philosophy.”

 


J. DePree (1891–1990) began work as a clerk for the Michigan Star Furniture Company. In 1914 he married Nellie Miller; they had seven children. In 1923, D. J. bought the Michigan Star Furniture Company with help from a loan from his father-in-law. D. J. renamed the company “Herman Miller” in his honor. D. J. was CEO until 1961; after he stepped down, his two sons took over management of the company. D. J. was also lay pastor of Ventura Baptist Church for eleven years.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Herman Miller Official Website, Fowler, Glenn, Dec. 13, 1999, D. J. DePree, Who Broke Ground In Furniture Design, Is Dead at 99, The New York Times, http://bit.do/fg6Lq  Fig¹.  Photo by David Martin on Unsplash 

Global Business: Build Your Global Business By Listening

 

So you are building a business. That’s wonderful!

One of the most important things we can do when we build, is to Listen. Listening helps us understand what our clients need. It tells us what we can produce that is of value. And it shows that we care.

This is even more important when we are working with people all over the world. 

 

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Respect the person, the culture, and their local community. To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world. You will then build the best product, and build the best team, for the world. 

 

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In addition, Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And, you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

Of course, this opens your business up to new opportunities.

 

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So it’s not just another day at work today. Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about listening carefully each moment.

 

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Then, it’s not work, but;

meaningful communication,

a meaningful product,

a meaningful team,

a meaningful life,

moment by moment.

Listen to attain your business bliss!

 

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Listening Is Bliss,

Pamela

 


Fig¹. Photo by fauxels on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels  Fig³. Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by bruce mars on Pexels  Fig⁵. Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All” – Henry Scott Holland

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

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“Death is nothing at all. I have only slipped away to the next room. I am I and you are you. Whatever we were to each other, That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name. Speak to me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without effect. Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same that it ever was. There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you. For an interval. Somewhere. Very near. Just around the corner. All is well.”

—Henry Scott Holland

 


Henry Scott Holland was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford. He was also a canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Henry was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire the son of George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham, and of the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He finished his studies in Balliol College in Oxford, England where he had the Oxford degrees of DD, MA, and Honorary DLitt. He was elected as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford after graduation and later went to St Paul’s Cathedral where he was appointed canon in 1884.

He was keenly interested in social justice and formed PESEK (Politics, Economics, Socialism, Ethics and Christianity) and tried to heal urban poverty. In 1889, he formed the Christian Social Union. In 1910, he was appointed Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, a post he held until his death in 1918. While at St Paul’s Cathedral, Holland delivered a sermon in May 1910 following the death of King Edward VII, titled Death the King of Terrors, in which he explores the natural but seemingly contradictory responses to death: the fear of the unexplained and the belief in continuity. It is from his discussion of the latter that perhaps his best-known writing, Death is nothing at all, is drawn:

“Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was. I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost. One brief moment and all will be as it was before. How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

The affinity of Holland’s passage to St. Augustine’s thoughts in his 4th Century letter 263 to Sapida is clear.  In it St. Augustin writes that Sapida’s brother and their love, although he has died, still are there, like gold that still is yours even if you save it in some locker.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Khadeeja Yasser on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Faith Is A Living, Daring Confidence

 

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times”

-Martin Luther

 

Faith is a living, daring confidence. Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God. And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

 

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He meant it for discussion, but he was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

 

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Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle. He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

 

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So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant. But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

 

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What do you need to take a stand for today?

With Gratitude For The Truth,

Pamela

 


Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.

Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.

The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university. Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.

In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.

Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture. In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church. Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.

Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Encyclopaedia Britannica.  Fig¹.  Photo by Zo on flickr  Fig².  Photo by Leon Macapagal on Pexels  Fig³. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels Fig⁴. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.

When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…

After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

- Warren Bennis

 

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I was honored to work in Leadership under Warren Bennis, a wonderful Business Leader. Ever calm and so very experienced, he taught us to look at life from an evaluative outlook.

What can I learn from this today?

How can I become better?

How will my life be better once I implement what I have learned?

 

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Take each step of life with great step of gratitude, goodness, and desire to grow. And upwards you go! With grace and peace. Thank you, dear Warren Bennis.

 


Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1955. His focus was on Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business. He has been married twice and has 4 children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig².  Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Today Is Filled With Opportunity To Do Good, And To Be Your Best Self. – Khalil Gibran

 

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

-Khalil Gibran

So how can we do that?

 

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It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Rohan Iyer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It Is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

―Proverbs 19:11

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay. Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

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It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 


Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16. The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech. The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Proverbs  Fig¹.  Photo by Jason Hogan on Unsplash