Tag Archives: change

The Classic Pamela Positive: Build Your Global Business by Listening

 

So you are building a business. That’s wonderful!

One of the most important things we can do when we build, is to Listen. Listening helps us understand what our clients need. It tells us what we can produce that is of value. And it shows that we care.

This is even more important when we are working with people all over the world. When getting involved internationally, it’s even more important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community. To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world. You will then build the best product, and build the best team, for the world. 

 

People Having Meeting

 

In addition, Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And, you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

Of course, this opens your business up to new opportunities.

So it’s not just another day at work today. Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about doing so each moment. Then, it’s not work, but meaningful communication, a meaningful product, a meaningful team, a meaningful life, moment by moment.  Listen to attain your business bliss!

 

Woman Sitting on Gray Chair

 

Listening Is Living,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

Fig².  Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Mahatma Gandhi Teaches Us: Love and Change, Start with You Now

 

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

– Mahatma Gandhi

 

Image result for Mahatma Gandhi

 

The key word here from one of our greatest leaders is ‘be.’ Every day we have a chance to be. And the most important being is loving. Being kind, gracious, and helping others. That can start today. We can and should whisk away frustration, for every moment of frustration is one not spent on being the positive force we hope to be. What type of foundation are you building? One that crumbles from exhaustion and disbelief, cynicism? Or one of solidity, brick, by brick, with each brick contributing Principle, Love, Kindness, Grace, Strength, Truth, Joy…? As Gandhi says… the other key word here is ‘you.’ No one can do this for you. Not your partner, your parents, your best friend or your spouse.  You… are the being.

 


Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Concept of Leadership


Fig¹.Photo by Wikimedia Commons

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Everything You Need Is Already Inside.” – Bill Bowerman

 

Everything you need is already inside. Just do it.

– Bill Bowerman

 

man jumping above rock mountain

 

I love Bill Bowerman’s quote, as he speaks to the potential and belief in each one of us… We should always strive to be our best and to believe in ourselves, even if we don’t always achieve our immediate goal. The importance is in the process and our motives.

We should treat ourselves and others with the utmost care, meaning, “We believe!” The alternative is costly to our health, to what we can achieve, and to what the world will miss…

What I love is that Bill Bowerman translated this belief across many areas — personal values, sports training and business. Believing isn’t relegated to any sector!

 


Bill Bowerman was a track and field coach for the University of Oregon. Born in Portland, Oregon, Bowerman was raised in Fossil, Oregon by his mother after his parents split. In his childhood, he was part of the school band and the football team. He received his B.A. from the University of Oregon, where he studied journalism and played football. He also served in the military as a Major in the army during World War II. In his 24-year career he trained 31 Olympic athletes, twelve American record holders, 51 All-Americans and 24 NCAA champions. One year he won 4 NCAA titles. In 1964 he became the co-founder of Nike. He and his wife Barbara were high school sweethearts, married for more than 60 years and they had two children together. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Blake Cheek on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Civility Is The Behavior That Marks…Share Common, Public, and Political Space” – Daniel Mendelsohn

 

“Civility is the behavior that marks mutual acknowledgement that we individuals share common, public, and political space. Think about the platforms through which you interact with people all day, the media that we call social, but if anything, have enhanced our ability to be asocial.

To screen every element of society, culture and politics that doesn’t suit or flatter or soothe us; thereby, removing the necessity for civility in the first place.”

―Daniel Mendelsohn

 

Graciousness, goodness, civility—all of this helps us to maintain a sense of calm and peace. Did you know anxiety is one of the most prevalent challenges we face in the U.S.? Nearly one 1/5 of our population experiences it. Yet only 1/3 try to find help.1 They are hurting… and continue to hurt. 

 

man wearing knit cap on grey background

 

Where do we think this anxiety is coming from? First, it’s coming from disconnectedness. We aren’t really getting the nurturance and love that we need from one-on-one interactions. And those interactions need to be with people we don’t know, and with people we do.

With people we do know, we build upon positive loving actions that make them become habit and security. With people we don’t know, it enforces the need to extend ourselves, to spread love and to give back. Both are essential.

 

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If we want more civility, that means that we need to slow down. If we want more civility, that means less screen time. If we want more civility, that means that we care and express our love for more people. It’s that simple. And who doesn’t want to love more? So let’s try.

May you live a civil day today, may you live it with care for everyone in every word that you give out, in every touch, and every comment that you make. And in every thought, so that in our minds and in our actions, civility becomes the natural way again.

 

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How we all long for graciousness and civility!

With Graciousness,

Pamela

 


Daniel Mendelsohn is a classist, writer, and critic. A graduate of Princeton’s graduate school, he published work on Euripidean tragedy before he went on to become a contributor to publications such as The New York TimesOutThe Nation and more. He was born in Long Island and raised in Old Bethage, New York. He received his undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia in Classics. He writes reviews on books, films, theater and television. He has won Princeton University’s James Madison Medal in 2018, American Philological Association President’s Award for service to the Classics in 2014 and the American Academy of Arts and Letters award for Prose Style in 2014. Currently, he is a professor at Bard College. He is also the director of the Robert B. Silvers Foundation, which supports writers. In his free time, Mendelsohn enjoys watching television and going to the movie theater. He has two children and four siblings, including a brother who is a film director, another brother who is a photographer and a sister who is a journalist.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Daniel Mendelsohn Official Website


Citations:

1 “Facts & Statistics”, Anxiety and Depression Association of America, https://adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics

Fig¹.  Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Fig². Photo by Kira auf der Heide on Unsplash

Fig³. Photo by Naassom Azevedo on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Your Daily Life Is Your Temple And Your Religion. When You Enter Into It Take With You Your All.” – Khalil Gibran

 

Every day we have a chance to give our all. It’s not always the big presentation or the graduation day, however. It’s not always the first day on the job, the day we get married, have a promotion or have a child!

Khalil Gibran is saying,

 

“Today is filled with opportunity to do good, and to be your best self.”

 

So how can we do that?

 

white mosque on daytime

 

It can be in how you treat your co-workers. It can be how you enter a room. It can be a simple smile as you pass someone in the hallway. It can even be in how you say “Good morning”!

Gibran encourages us that the legacy we are leaving as individuals starts today. It’s not something that shows up 60 or 70 years later down the road. Legacy and your temple of living begins now.

So start building your temple. It’s in how you greet each person, help each person, in every activity, every day. That’s a calling!

Love To You Today As You Build Your Special Temple,

Pamela


Khalil Gibran was born on January 6, 1883, in Bsharri, Lebanon. He immigrated with his mother and siblings to Boston in 1895 – his father remained in Lebanon to address financial matters. Gibran would return to Lebanon three years later to continue his education but returned to America after illness took the life of one of his sisters. He met Mary Haskell who encouraged his artistic development. During his life, Gibran was a prolific artist who created hundreds of paintings and drawings. In 1920, he was a co-founder, along with other poets of Arab and Lebanese backgrounds, of The Pen-bond Society, a literary society, also known as Al Rabitat al Qualamiya. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature. The Prophet (1923), a book of poetic essays, achieved cult status among American youth for several generations. In 1928, he published Jesus, the Son of Man. Gibran died in New York City on April 10, 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Rohan Iyer on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

―Proverbs 19:11 (New International Version)

 

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay. Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

man opening his arms wide open on snow covered cliff with view of mountains during daytime

 

It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 


Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16. The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech. The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Proverbs


Fig¹.  Photo by Jason Hogan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All” -Henry Scott Holland

 

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

 

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

 

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Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

—Henry Scott Holland

 

 


Henry Scott Holland was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford. He was also a canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Henry was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire the son of George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham, and of the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He finished his studies in Balliol College in Oxford, England where he had the Oxford degrees of DD, MA, and Honorary DLitt. He was elected as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford after graduation and later went to St Paul’s Cathedral where he was appointed canon in 1884.

He was keenly interested in social justice and formed PESEK (Politics, Economics, Socialism, Ethics and Christianity) and tried to heal urban poverty. In 1889, he formed the Christian Social Union. In 1910, he was appointed Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, a post he held until his death in 1918. While at St Paul’s Cathedral, Holland delivered a sermon in May 1910 following the death of King Edward VII, titled Death the King of Terrors, in which he explores the natural but seemingly contradictory responses to death: the fear of the unexplained and the belief in continuity. It is from his discussion of the latter that perhaps his best-known writing, Death is nothing at all, is drawn:

“Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was. I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost. One brief moment and all will be as it was before. How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

The affinity of Holland’s passage to St. Augustine’s thoughts in his 4th Century letter 263 to Sapida is clear.  In it St. Augustin writes that Sapida’s brother and their love, although he has died, still are there, like gold that still is yours even if you save it in some locker.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

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