Tag Archives: goodness

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” -Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

―Russell Conwell

 

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It’s that simple.

Give Something Today,

Pamela

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Nathan Lemon on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Find Out: How Do I Fit In Here?” – Heidi Klum

 

“You have to make things happen. There are bumps in the road: my agent, my weight, an industry looking for cool girls more than a commercial look. These are hurdles, and you have to find your way. You have to find out: How do I fit in here?”

― Heidi Klum

 

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This might look daunting, but there is a way up. This person found a way!

No matter what the challenge is you are facing, you will find a way to do so. We can learn, challenge ourselves, and believe.

Up You Go!

Pamela

 


Heidi Klum, born in 1973 in Germany, is a supermodel, actress, businesswoman, and television producer. She produces and hosts the award-winning reality television show Project Runway and has appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated, Vogue, Elle, and Marie Claire. She became widely known after appearing as a Victoria’s Secret Angel because she was the first German model to become a Victoria Secret Angel. Heidi has also worked in philanthropy, specifically with Walk For Kids in 2011 and the American Red Cross. She has been nominated for six Emmy Awards, worked with H&M, and became the official ambassador for Barbie in 2009. Heidi is mother to four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Hu Chen on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next

 

What To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do Next?

Have faith, then take another step.

 

Person Walking on the Field

 

That’s how life works and soon you’ll reach your destination. So start walking, believing, and doing today!

 

Love,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Quang Nguyen Vinh on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

―Proverbs 19:11 (New International Version)

 

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay. Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

man opening his arms wide open on snow covered cliff with view of mountains during daytime

 

It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 


Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16. The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech. The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Proverbs


Fig¹.  Photo by Jason Hogan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I shut my eyes in order to see.” – Paul Gauguin

 

“I shut my eyes in order to see.” 

– Paul Gauguin

 

 

assorted-color paints and paintbrushes on white tarp

 

Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) was an artist who was renowned for his Post Impressionism painting in the 19th century. He was an innovator in the use of bold colors. At the same time, he also brought out the meaning of each subject. He balanced authenticity with innovation.

 

What we can learn from Paul Gauguin: Let’s ‘see’ differently. Don’t use your eyes.  Instead, use “meaning” to see.

 

 

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What’s meaningful to you? Be bold in recognizing it. You’ll see an amazing painting of goodness, kindness and abundance all around you, if you will just see.

 

 


Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading French Post-Impressionist artist who was not well appreciated until after his death. Gauguin was born in Paris to Clovis Gauguin and Aline Chazal on June 7, 1848.His father, a 34-year-old liberal journalist, came from a family of entrepreneurs residing in Orléans. He was compelled to flee France when the newspaper for which he wrote was suppressed by French authorities.

Gauguin was later recognized for his experimental use of colors and synthetist style that were distinguishably different from Impressionism. His work was influential to the French avant-garde and many modern artists, such as Pablo Picasso, and Henri Matisse. Many of his paintings were in the possession of Russian collector Sergei Shchukin. He was an important figure in the Symbolist movement as a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramist, and writer. His bold experimentation with coloring led directly to the Synthetist style of modern art, while his expression of the inherent meaning of the subjects in his paintings, under the influence of the cloisonnist style, paved the way to Primitivism and the return to the pastoral. He was also an influential proponent of wood engraving and woodcuts as art forms.

In 1873, he married a Danish woman, Mette-Sophie Gad (1850–1920). Over the next ten years, they had five children.

BioSource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹.Photo by Taelynn Christopher on Unsplash

Fig².Photo by Irina on flickr

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

 

 

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”

—Lao Tzu

 

green leafed plant on clear glass vase filled with water

 

 

Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure. If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism. It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

 

man standing on stone looking at sunset

 

 

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted. We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

 

 


Legends vary, but scholars place Lao Tzu birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

According to many popular legends, the philosopher got married and also had a son named ‘Zong’, who later became a legendary soldier.

Biosource: Wikipedia, The Famous People


Citations:

Fig¹.Sarah Dorweiler on Unsplash

Fig².Joshua Earle on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Death Is Nothing At All” -Henry Scott Holland

 

 

My beloved Oma was one of my best friends. And yet she is with me constantly. It’s not easy, it never will be, but it changes. I am learning to become more natural in my connection with her, even though I can’t see her. I can still feel her presence, I can still feel her love.

 

I spoke this from memory at her service, and I still love it to this day. Oma, I know you are “just around the corner.” I love you, Oma.

 

 

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Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away to the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other,

That, we still are.

Call me by my old familiar name.

Speak to me in the easy way which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone.

Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play, smile, think of me. Pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word

that it always was.

Let it be spoken without effect.

Without the trace of a shadow on it.

Life means all that it ever meant.

It is the same that it ever was.

There is absolute unbroken continuity.

Why should I be out of mind

because I am out of sight?

I am but waiting for you.

For an interval.

Somewhere. Very near.

Just around the corner.

All is well.

—Henry Scott Holland

 

 


Henry Scott Holland was Regius Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford. He was also a canon of Christ Church, Oxford.

Henry was born at Ledbury, Herefordshire the son of George Henry Holland of Dumbleton Hall, Evesham, and of the Hon. Charlotte Dorothy Gifford, the daughter of Lord Gifford. He finished his studies in Balliol College in Oxford, England where he had the Oxford degrees of DD, MA, and Honorary DLitt. He was elected as a Student (fellow) of Christ Church, Oxford after graduation and later went to St Paul’s Cathedral where he was appointed canon in 1884.

He was keenly interested in social justice and formed PESEK (Politics, Economics, Socialism, Ethics and Christianity) and tried to heal urban poverty. In 1889, he formed the Christian Social Union. In 1910, he was appointed Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, a post he held until his death in 1918. While at St Paul’s Cathedral, Holland delivered a sermon in May 1910 following the death of King Edward VII, titled Death the King of Terrors, in which he explores the natural but seemingly contradictory responses to death: the fear of the unexplained and the belief in continuity. It is from his discussion of the latter that perhaps his best-known writing, Death is nothing at all, is drawn:

“Death is nothing at all. It does not count. I have only slipped away into the next room. Nothing has happened. Everything remains exactly as it was. I am I, and you are you, and the old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged. Whatever we were to each other, that we are still. Call me by the old familiar name. Speak of me in the easy way which you always used. Put no difference into your tone. Wear no forced air of solemnity or sorrow. Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together. Play, smile, think of me, pray for me. Let my name be ever the household word that it always was. Let it be spoken without an effort, without the ghost of a shadow upon it. Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was. There is absolute and unbroken continuity. What is this death but a negligible accident? Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight? I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner. All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost. One brief moment and all will be as it was before. How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting when we meet again!”

The affinity of Holland’s passage to St. Augustine’s thoughts in his 4th Century letter 263 to Sapida is clear.  In it St. Augustin writes that Sapida’s brother and their love, although he has died, still are there, like gold that still is yours even if you save it in some locker.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

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