Tag Archives: growth

The Classic Pamela Positive: Winston Churchill: We’re Not Made of Sugar Candy

cotton-candy-434810_1280“We have not journeyed all this way across the centuries, across the oceans, across the mountains, across the prairies, because we are made of sugar candy.”

-Sir Winston Churchill

Going through a tough time?  Does the mountain you are climbing seem too steep?

But it’s not just a mountain, and it’s not your only mountain.

You are striving not only for yourself, but also for others.  Whatever you are trying to achieve today, whatever you hope to have in the future, can be used as inspiration for others…

You’re learning from it. Growing from it, and becoming a better person. Don’t give up, you don’t want to do that; Don’t be discouraged, it won’t aid your cause.  You’re not a piece of cotton candy, disintegrating; no, you are firm, resolute, patient.

Your mountain lesson isn’t just for you. It will be an example, a story with which you can encourage others.

Thank you for persevering — the world thanks you!

___

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician and was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer, and an artist. He is the only British Prime Minister to have received the Nobel Prize in Literature, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States.  He was born into the aristocratic family of the Dukes of Marlborough, a branch of the Spencer family.  Churchill married Clementine Hozier in 1908 and had five children: Diana, Randolph, Sarah, Marigold Frances, and Mary. (Bio source: Wikipedia: Sir Winston Churchill)

A Letter to my Son…Who’s Not Working (Part 5 of 5)

Letter 5 of 5

This is a five-part series of letters from a loving parent to a son. The letters demonstrate how parents can love and support their children during transitional periods. As young adults build their own identity and search for employment, a parent’s kind words can assist them in their journey.
Read the first letter here.

Dear Son,

We’re hoping this sounds like a great plan for you – getting a job of your choice. I am not so concerned about what it is, but I do hope it is something that you want to do. When we apply ourselves to something we like, our lives continue month after month and year after year, building a track record or positivity and success.  That’s where our sense of self, identity, and esteem comes from.

It’s been a wonderful year having you home. I hope you see how much I have tried to help you with school and other areas.  I thought you might want to read this before we talked.  I am looking forward to hearing about your new independent life and to cheering you on.

With great love and admiration for who you are,

Sincerely,

Your Dad

This is the final letter of this five part series. Read letters one, two, three or four.

 

A Letter To My Son…Who’s Not Working (Part 4 of 5)

Letter 4 of 5

This is a five-part series of letters from a loving parent to a son. The letters demonstrate how parents can love and support their children during transitional periods. As young adults build their own identity and search for employment, a parent’s kind words can assist them in their journey.
Read the first letter here.

Dear Son,

Next, we are going to provide a plan of support you:

– For the next 2 months, your sole focus will be on getting a full-time job with a goal of supporting yourself.

-The sooner you get the job, the better it will be because, as with all adults, it’s time to start saving.

– We’ll continue to provide you a car, free gas, free food in the refrigerator and if you’re fortunate like we often are, Debra’s* lovely cooking.  🙂 The cleaners will continue to come to the home and clean your room as well.

-When you have the job after two months, we will allow you to stay for four months with that job. The goal is to give you a cushion to save.  

– At that time, you will have had no expenses and 4-6 months of saving. That’s good padding and support from us in order to get on your feet and pay for your own apartment. This will give you a great appreciation for living on your own and also, perhaps, the freedom you seek.

-After the six months, you are welcome to come over every Sunday night for dinner. We would love to have you. We love our family time and we feel so fortunate that you are near.

*Names Changed

Click here for the final letter of this five part series.

A Letter To My Son…Who’s Not Working (Part 2 of 5)

Letter 2 of 5

This is a five-part series of letters from a loving parent to a son. The letters demonstrate how parents can love and support their children during transitional periods. As young adults build their own identity and search for employment, a parent’s kind words can assist them in their journey.
Read the first letter here.

Dear Son,

I know that in the past couple of years, we have struggled with college. As your father, I feel it is important to set you up with tools to succeed so that you can be a strong, educated individual who can provide for himself, and if you want, a family. These days, life can be very competitive and I want my son to not only survive but to thrive and succeed. Therefore, in my humble opinion, having a college degree is most important. It not only helps you attain the best jobs but also attain greater pay.  

But I’ve realized lately that this might be my wish, and not yours. It might be a time to take a break from studies. You’re now 23.  There are many years and courses to go until you finish college. It doesn’t seem you’re that motivated to do so.

Maybe it’s time to take a different approach. Just please know that my strong efforts in the past to help you regarding college were out of love. I want you to have a strong and positive future.

Remember while I’ll always love you, I won’t always be physically present on Earth. I think about that, Joe. I want you to be able to provide for yourself when I’m not here. So thank you for understanding when I have gotten involved in your life — it’s because I love you, and sometimes I get worried.

Click here for the next letter in this five part series.

The Pamela Positive: “I Am Here for a Purpose and That Purpose Is to Grow into a Mountain.” – Og Mandino

“I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand. Henceforth will I apply all my efforts to become the highest mountain of all and I will strain my potential until it cries for mercy.” – Og Mandino

I love this quote by Og Mandino.  He uses wonderful analogies with nature, encouraging us to think big.  But what I love most is that when we think big, being the best we can be, it is so that we may help others.

Og Mandino is a well-known author.  His bestselling book, The Greatest Salesman in the World, sold more than 50 million copies.  His book was translated into 25 different languages.  In addition, he served as the president of Success Unlimited Magazine, and was inducted into the National Speakers Association’s Hall Of Fame.

The Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” – Mark Twain

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“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

It’s okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us.  And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine.  You inspire.

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835.  In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of antebellum south.  His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes.  He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

mark-twain-1602117_1280.jpg

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” – Mark Twain

Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain

wanderer-455338_1280

It’s okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us.  And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights. You inspire!

***

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835.  In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of antebellum south.  His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes.  He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture he wrote about.