Tag Archives: growth

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Big Lesson In Life, Baby, Is Never Be Scared Of Anyone Or Anything.” – Frank Sinatra

 

 

“The big lesson in life, baby, is never be scared of anyone or anything.”

— Frank Sinatra

 

 

 

 

Many of us wish we could say that. 🙂  If we are trusting and calm in our thoughts, then we truly cannot be scared of anyone, or anything.

 

 


Frank Sinatra (December 12, 1915 – May 14, 1998) was an American singer and film actor. Beginning his musical career in the swing era as a boy singer with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra found unprecedented success as a solo artist from the early to mid-1940s after being signed by Columbia Records in 1943 and released his first album The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946.  He later signed with Capitol Records in 1953 until he left Capitol in 1961 to find his own record label Reprise Records.  Among the albums he released are Come Fly with Me, Nice ‘n’ Easy, and Sinatra at the Sands.  His film credits include From Here to Eternity (won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor), The Man with the Golden Arm (nominated for the Best Actor Oscar), The Manchurian Candidate, Guys and Dolls, and High Society.

Sinatra had three children, Nancy, Frank Jr., and Tina, all with his first wife, Nancy Sinatra (née Barbato) (m. 1939–1951). He was married three more times, to actresses Ava Gardner (m. 1951–1957), Mia Farrow (m. 1966–1968) and finally to Barbara Marx (m. 1976–1998; his death).

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹.  Wikimedia

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Can’t Buy Happiness

 

 

Money cant buy happiness.  Sometimes we forget this. Remember, it was the Beatles who brought this up through their songs. They had powerful messages which made us think. 

 

 

File:Televisie-optreden van The Beatles in Treslong te Hillegom vlnr. Paul McCartney, Bestanddeelnr 916-5099.jpg

 

 

So the next time you are enjoying one of their songs, remember, too, their life advice. Money cant buy happiness.

Strong relationships do. Working at something you love can bring it. Spending time with those you respect does. Adhering to your values does. Relationships, sincere work, people and values bring you happiness. 

 

 

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Focus on those four areas, and not only will you have happiness, but the money will come. Youll be doing what you love to do, and that will surely be compensated.

Do What You Love, Do It With Love,

Pamela

 

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Wikimedia commons

Fig². Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Our Doubts Are Traitors.” – William Shakespeare

 

 

“Our doubts are traitors.”

– William Shakespeare

 

 

William Shakespere

 

 

Don’t let doubt into for your life, for it is not a friend. He is not your companion in any way. Would you go on a special walk with Doubt in the hills? Take Doubt to lunch?  Get married to Doubt?

Then stop spending time with him  — especially in your mind.

 

 


William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 [baptized] – 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist and often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon”. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. His works and collaborations consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain.  His numerous works include Hamlet, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, and Much Ado About Nothing. To this day his works have been repeatedly adopted, rediscovered, and reinterpreted in many contexts around the world.

Biosource: Wikipedia

Citation:
Fig¹. Royal Opera House on flickr

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Four

 

 

This is Part Four of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One, Two, and Three.

 

 

Thank you for joining me on this Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We’ve seen world-renowned car racer Mario Andretti follow his passion since he was a teenager, and become an award-winning driver! He’s stayed grounded, family-oriented and still involved with his passion of cars.

 

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What do you do next?

 

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You can give back.

Successful people find a way to help others, because they know they have been helped.

No one does it alone.

And that’s what he does!

On philanthropy, Mario states:

 

“You try to channel it in areas where you know it’s going to make a difference,” he said. “You try to do those things as the opportunity comes along. These are all the things that at the end of the day, it makes you feel good that I made a little bit of a difference, and that’s meaningful.”6

 

Mario gives back through Meals on Wheels, to help the elderly and housebound attain food security. In honor of Mario, we are also giving back — we’ve chosen Nepal Orphans Home Inc. project for fresh food and Rural Communities Empowerment Center’s project to bring technology and resources to communities in great need. In that way we honor his passion and his philanthropy.

 

Thank you joining us on our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader; Practical Steps to Following Your Passion.

 

We are so glad you joined us in learning about Mario Andretti’s successful life. If it a world class race driver can make it by starting out in a refugee camp, you can too. Follow your passion, gain experience and then give back.

 

I thank you for being the great leader you are, and look forward to you sharing your journey! We will all look forward to hearing!

 

You’re Leading,

Pamela

 

 


 

Mario Andretti is an extremely successful race car driver and the only race car driver to have ever won the Indianapolis 500, the Daytona 500, and the Formula One World Championship. Mario, and his fraternal twin brother Aldo, were born in the former territory known as Istria. At the end of World War II, the territory was annexed by Yugoslovia and the Andretti family left in 1948 during what’s known as the Istrian exodus. They ended up in a refugee camp in Lucca, Italy, where his father would work hard labor jobs before they received the visa to join his uncle in Pennsylvania. Mario and his brother Aldo rebuilt a 1948 Hudson Commodore and began racing it. Aldo won the coin toss to do the first race and he won. Aldo went on to fracture his skull in a serious crash, but he would return later on. In 1969, Aldo suffered severe damage after crashing into a fence during an IMCA race and he quit racing.

 

In 1961, he married Dee Ann Andretti and they had three children together. Their two sons, Jeff and Michael, would also become race car drivers. Following Mario’s retirement, he has spent his time in a multitude of ways—including volunteering with Meals on Wheels deliveries in Pennsylvania. With his late wife Dee Ann, he was also involved with a number of local children’s charities.

 


Citations:
⁶ Ryan, Natem “Mario Andretti saluted for his charity work: ‘I love positive’”, NBC Sports, April 14, 2015, https://motorsports.nbcsports.com/2015/04/14/mario-andretti-saluted-for-his-charity-work-i-love-positives/
Fig. ¹⁰: Photo by Jim Culp retrieved from Flickr, https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimculp/29455644593
Fig. ¹¹: Photo by William on Unsplash

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Three of Four

 

 

This is Part Three of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”.  Please click these links to read parts One and Two.

 

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

Within 20 years, Mario was a world-renowned racer. He was living his dream, and in America. He was married with children and awards and all. What to do next?

 

Beautifully and interestingly enough, Mario stayed true to his roots. He still lives in Nazareth, Pennsylvania and still spends time in his garages. He stays humble. He stays grounded. He still loves his cars. His life is very consistent.

 

 

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“I love spending time in the garages on either side of our house. I have 9 cars in all, including a Lamborghini and a Corvette.”5

 

So that’s a good lesson. Even when he can retire, he still pays attention to his cars.  He takes care of them and loves them and drives them.

 

 

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He drives to his passion and his passion drives his life.   It’s a great life partnership, one can have with one’s passion for one’s entire life!

 

You can do this too. You call follow your passion, and live your full life.

 

 

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What a beautiful story. Let’s find our passion, and stay true to humble dreams. They will happen!

 

Dreams are happening for you,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Four of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 


Citations:
⁵ Mybers, Marc, Ibid.
Fig. ⁷: Photo by Raul Varzar on Unsplash
Fig. ⁸: Racingone/ ISC Archives via Getty Images, retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-indy500-1981-unser-20160512-story.html
Fig. ⁹: Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

 

 

Leadership Series: Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane To America, Part Two of Four

 

 

This is Part Two of Four in the Series on “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America”. Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

Thank you for joining our Leadership Series: How To Become a Leader     

 

We feature real-life stories on how people became successful leaders, so you can too. We show you Practical Steps and Stories to Following Your Passion, leading you to your own success. Our feature today is on Mario Andretti, a world-class racer who started out in a refugee camp. Join us as we continue to explore his life story!

 

The Mario Andretti family was on its way from war-torn Italy to America.  They had been working in car shops, learning, gaining experience. Heads-down, hands-in-car-parts operations. Learning, learning, learning. With perseverance, they followed their dreams.

 

 

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With patience, visas came three years later. Their family migrated to Pennsylvania where family resided. Always an observer, after dinner one night in Pennsylvania, Mario and his brother saw something flashing in the distance as well as loud sounds. They soon found it was their love! It was the explosion of a car engine!

 

 

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They literally ran towards their passion, which was about a mile away and featured a racetrack. They had a high-end taste in cars due to being from Italy and their work on Formula 1 cars. While these cars were different, the boys kept showing up at the track. Experience built upon experience. It was time to build their own car for the first time: a 1948 Hudson Commodore.

 

To get in at the race track, they stated they were 19 and 21 years old, racers from Italy. Soon, Aldo and his brother, Mario, each won two of the first four stock-car races. 4 They won nearly $150 and used that to build their next car.5 Their passion was on their way! Instead of working on cars, they were now building them — and racing them!  

 

 

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Now Mario is considered one of the top race car drivers in the world. He’s won the 1978 Formula One World Championship races and most specifically, the top IndyCar race, 4 times. He’s known for being the only driver to win the NASCAR Cup Series, Formula One and an Indianapolis 500.

 

 

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So you can follow your passion, too, and realize success. Mario is a good man, and he did it. You can be a good person, and you can do it.

 

Follow Passion = Realize Success,

Pamela

 

 

Stay tuned for Part Three of the Four Part Series “Mario Andretti’s Fast Lane to America” tomorrow!

 

 


Citations:
³ Myers, Marc “Mario Andretti: From Italian Refugee Camp to the Winner’s Circle at Indy”, The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2018, https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-mario-andretti-one-of-the-fastest-americans-ever-discovered-his-speed-1533047673
Fig. ³: Photo by Vance Osterhout on Unsplash
Fig. ⁴: Photo by Oscar Sutton on Unsplash
Fig. ⁵: Photo by MiRo Am on Unsplash
Fig. ⁶: Amy Hollowbush, contributed photo retrieved from https://www.mcall.com/sports/motorracing/mc-mario-andretti-daytona-500-5020170221-story.html

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

 

 

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It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.