Tag Archives: writing

The Pamela Positive: “When You Believe Everything Is Finished…” – Louis L’Amour

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“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. This will be the beginning.”
– Louis L’Amour

—✶—

Louis L’Amour was an American author. He is best known for his Western fiction novels, though he also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction, poetry and short-story collections.  He was born Louis Dearborn LaMoore on March 22, 1908, the last of seven children.  He grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, a medium-sized farming community.  As he grew older, he traveled throughout the United States and abroad, in various positions including as a mine assessment worker, a professional boxer and a merchant seaman.  In the 1930s, Louis and his family settled in Oklahoma, and Louis turned his focus to writing.  He began to have success with short stories in the late ‘30s and ‘40s, beginning to sell novels in the 1950s.  Louis also served in the United States Army during World War II.  Louis ultimately wrote 89 novels and more than 250 short stories.

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The Pamela Positive: “When You Believe Everything Is Finished…” – Louis L’Amour

wanderer-455338_1280

“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. This will be the beginning.”
– Louis L’Amour

—✶—

Louis L’Amour was an American author. He is best known for his Western fiction novels, though he also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction, poetry and short-story collections.  He was born Louis Dearborn LaMoore on March 22, 1908, the last of seven children.  He grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, a medium-sized farming community.  As he grew older, he traveled throughout the United States and abroad, in various positions including as a mine assessment worker, a professional boxer and a merchant seaman.  In the 1930s, Louis and his family settled in Oklahoma, and Louis turned his focus to writing.  He began to have success with short stories in the late ‘30s and ‘40s, beginning to sell novels in the 1950s.  Louis also served in the United States Army during World War II.  Louis ultimately wrote 89 novels and more than 250 short stories.

Top Thing You Must Do When You Think/Hear Something Negative

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“The Buddha has a very beautiful metaphor… He calls it “like writing on water.” Whenever an unwholesome thought or emotion arises in an enlightened mind, it is like writing on water; the moment it is written, it disappears.”

– Chade Meng Tan, author of Search Inside Yourself, The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness (and World Peace)

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The Classic Pamela Positive: Something That Finishes…Is Only a Beginning

“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished.  This will be the beginning.”

– Louis L’Amour

Don’t be afraid when something ends. That means something else is going to bloom — or boom for you.  There is no sad or disappointing end. It’s simply a transition.  Let’s all trust that higher wisdom.

If nature knows exactly when the bud should blossom, does it not also know when your life should blossom?  Every event is joyously and perfectly planned.

Love, Pamela

Louis L’Amour was an American author. He is best known for his Western fiction novels, though he also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction, poetry and short-story collections.  He was born Louis Dearborn LaMoore on March 22, 1908, the last of seven children.  He grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, a medium-sized farming community.  As he grew older, he traveled throughout the United States and abroad, in various positions including as a mine assessment worker, a professional boxer and a merchant seaman.  In the 1930s, Louis and his family settled in Oklahoma, and Louis turned his focus to writing.  He began to have success with short stories in the late ‘30s and ‘40s, beginning to sell novels in the 1950s.  Louis also served in the United States Army during World War II.  Louis ultimately wrote 89 novels and more than 250 short stories.

 

“I Would Make Something Happen” – Louis L’Amour

One of our prolific American writers from the Midwest, Louis L’Amour wrote about the rugged wilderness of the west in the 1900s.  He spoke of our pioneering spirit, the need to create our future, and the adventure of it all. And so he has good advice for any entrepreneur:

“I would not sit waiting for some vague tomorrow, nor for something to happen. One could wait a lifetime, and find nothing at the end of the waiting. I would begin here, I would make something happen.”

Louis L’Amour was an American author. He is best known for his Western fiction novels, though he also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction, poetry and short-story collections.  He was born Louis Dearborn LaMoore on March 22, 1908, the last of seven children.  He grew up in Jamestown, North Dakota, a medium-sized farming community.  As he grew older, he traveled throughout the United States and abroad, in various positions including as a mine assessment worker, a professional boxer and a merchant seaman.

In the 1930s, Louis and his family settled in Oklahoma, and Louis turned his focus to writing.  He began to have success with short stories in the late ‘30s and ‘40s, beginning to sell novels in the 1950s.  Louis also served in the United States Army during World War II.  Louis ultimately wrote 89 novels and more than 250 short stories.

The Pamela Positive: “Do What You Think Is Right and Interesting”

Good advice from Adam Rapoport, as featured in Gwyneth Paltrow’s newsletter, GOOP:

“I’ve always believed that if you want to do something well and create something worthwhile, you’ve got to do it your way. You’ve got to commit to it and believe in yourself. As a writer, whenever you try to write in someone else’s style or voice – or give the editor what you think he or she wants instead of what you want- it always turns out badly. You should do what you think is right and interesting.”

Adam Rapoport is the editor-in-chief of Bon Appetit.  Read his full interview in GOOP, about Bon Appetit, food and family.

 

Already a Leader, Deborah Santana Turns Her Heart Global

One my newest favorite people is Deborah Santana.  This is a woman filled with truth, soul, kindness.  It radiates from her inner core, her smile, and her clear eyes.   When she speaks, it is a woman speaking of a sincere, caring love for herself, for the world, and for each being she encounters.  I loved our recent dinner together!  She is seeking the truth for herself and everyone.

Then… just add the icing. She is a writer…holds workshops to help people find their own humble power and place  in the world… and encourages all.  She loves and nurtures her three children.  She has won awards, is an amazing businesswoman, and despite some tough personal challenges, she is a survivor, and one willing to help people through what she’s learned from her journey.

Now imagine that Deborah Santana takes it a step further. She doesn’t have to.  And she does… she has extended her care beyond her immediate circle, her community, her family, this country.  She is involved globally, and allows herself to get right into the heart of the challenges.   At this point, I am not going to relate more…for you should just read for yourself, her empowered, loving, realistic, pained but rising words below. 
 

Deborah Santana
Not a Spoon or a Pot
9.18.10

There are no crosswalks in the small town my friend visited in Haiti.

Beside a road, she met a woman with seven children who sleep together

           in a one room hut.

One pair of pants, one shirt each – no other possessions –

          not a spoon or a pot;

No picture frames, no photos, no beds, no schoolbooks,

          no bus fare, no earrings, no school.

 

When summer comes, the children go to the countryside to pick mangoes.

I imagine then they are able to eat more than ears of corn

         Roasted on a dirt pit outside.

 

Maybe then they smile, their fingers pulling back thick green mango skin,

          eyes widening at the sight of soft orange mango flesh.

Startling first touch of fruit to lip,

Teeth biting and tiny mango hairs stuck between,

Sweet perfumed juice running down chins like mercy.

 

Similar to my experience in Peru, Deborah sees the challenge of poverty upfront…

If you are interested in supporting the Daraja Academy, which Deborah is creating a film about, please donate or volunteer.  It’s a superb effort in Kenya!

Here is more about Deborah.  She is a remarkable woman who has changed the world through music and philanthropy, all across the world.