Tag Archives: world change

The Classic Pamela Positive: “What the World Needs Is People Who Have Come Alive” – Howard Thurman

 

“Don’t ask yourself what the world needs. Ask yourself what makes you come alive and then go do that. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”

– Howard Thurman

 

This is very true.

 

 

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Often I hear people say,”Oh! I wish I did something meaningful like you do, helping the world.”

 

Working in philanthropy is a wonderful way to serve. But just because you aren’t a social worker, teacher, or philanthropist doesn’t mean you aren’t living a meaningful life of service.

 

Follow what your deepest inner voice tells you – not what society says. You are created for a purpose.

 

 

 

 

It may be that you have a passion and talent for design. Help make peoples’ homes a special haven. We all need a haven, and a place to welcome others, and ourselves.

 

 

 

 

Perhaps you love numbers. Become an accountant or work at a bank. Help provide order and semblance to the operations and reports.

 

What would I do without my bank? Where would I put the deposits of donations for UniversalGiving? We need you, and we need a good banker.

 

 

 

 

You love sports. Play that game with integrity and enthusiasm! With the greatest sportsmanship. You will be a model for everyone watching, your colleagues, the audience, the referees, and any children present. Modeling positive energy and ethics, you can’t lose.

 

So much of life is simply how we live each moment. It’s how we govern each activity.

 

 

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You serve by being kind. You serve by following your passion. You serve by being true to yourself. Don’t do what you think you should do; do what you are created to do. You will find all types of wonderful people needing your inspiration and services, in ways you’ve never imagined.

 

And remember, the most important is “who you be.” Did you live kindly, with integrity, with joy today?

 

That’s the greatest service to our world, and open to all.

 

Take the time,

Pamela

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Days of Linear Giving Are Over

 

The days of “linear giving” are over — what I mean is, it’s not “I give you this, you give me that.”  That’s Linear Giving and it doesn’t always happen. 
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First, you can’t truly give with the expectation that you are going to get something in return.  It’s just not the right motivation.  And it will upset the balance of giving, turning it into something it’s not…

 

 

 

 

 

We need to give because we sincerely want to. Because it’s the right thing to do. It’s helpful, kind, nourishing to the world. And ultimately it does help ourselves… we feel nourished and uplifted by the mere act of being generous.

 

And it won’t stop there. More good will continue to come to you, in ways you never expected.  From different places, different sources, and in unique ways!  It’s truly quite exciting…to see good unfold, when we let it go.

 

So let’s not give and expect back. It’s not A gives to B, and B to gives to A.

 

It’s A gives to B.  And then A gives to C and D.  Then X, M, Q and V give back to A at different times and ways in the future.

 

 

 

 

It’s circular, spherical, timeless, unbound, ever connected giving… which is taking place, and always has been.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Dag Hammarskjold Gives Hope to the World

 

Dag Hammarskjold was such a wonderful model of what the U.N. can be and do. As Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1953 to 1961, Hammarskjold was known for his unrelenting energy given to fairness, peace and collaboration. He represented hope and reconciliation throughout many corners of our world.

 

Hammarskjold supported countries whether or not there was an economic interest, as it should be.  Equitable involvement for all countries was his philosophy.

 

 

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For example in the Suez Crisis, when Egypt nationalized the canal, Hammarskjold was able to broker French, British and Egyptian collaboration to keep it open. Meanwhile, Israel attacked Egypt and the peace process was upset. With Mr. Hammarskjold’s leadership, U.N. Forces were able to maintain a peaceful solution until a longer term solution was reached.

 

In endangered Laos, he was able to place UN representatives there, which provided watchful protection. He also became part of a very long-term process against apartheid, meeting several times with the Union of South Africa, opening up attitudes of equality and fairness regarding race.

 

 

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Hammarskjold’s last challenge was the crisis in the Congo where violent civil war was ensuing. Here he had brokered leaders meeting in neutral territory to resolve the conflict. Unfortunately, his plane was shot down and he did not survive.

 

Dag Hammarskjold was mourned by the world. He was seen as an extremely strong leader led by principles; tireless and needing little sleep.

 

 

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It was as if he were “on call” for the world.

 

“The world in which I grew up in was dominated by principles and ideals…I inherited a belief that no life was more satisfactory than one of selfless service to your country or humanity.  This sacrifice required a sacrifice of all personal interests, but likewise the courage to stand up unflinchingly for your convictions.”

 

 

 

Hammarskjold also created a meditation room or peace room in the U.N.  It is a place only for thoughts, no words, and embraces all types of prayers.  There is a stone in the middle of the room with nothing on it, and yet a shaft of light shines directly there.  It is dedicated as an altar to harmony and freedom that is worshipped in many forms, by different countries and peoples, in many varied ways all over the world.

 

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Dag Hammarskjold was an economist and diplomat who was the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. He was born in Jönköping and grew up in Uppsala. His father was Hjalmar Hammarskjöld, the Prime Minister of Sweden from 1914 to 1917. By the age of 25, he had already received a Licentiate of Philosophy and his Master of Laws degree. After receiving his Ph.D. in Economics, Hammarskjold began serving his country in various roles from state secretary in the Ministry of Finance to being vice chairman of of the Swedish delegation to the United Nations General Assembly. In becoming Secretary-General, he received an unexpected nomination from the Secretary Council (with China abstaining) and he surprised everyone with his knowledge of the United Nations’ affairs when accepting his nominations. He’s widely considered to be one of the two best Secretary-Generals of the United Nations. During his tenure, he made sure to promote peace and equality both within and outside the United Nations. Hammarskjold promoted peace in Congo and he was unexpectedly killed en route to a trip there. After his death, he was rewarded a Nobel Prize. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Wisdom from Sissy Spacek on Why You Are Here

 

“You are here to make the world a better place because you’ve lived.”

– Sissy Spacek

 

 

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*****

 

Sissy Spacek is an American actress and singer. Her breakout role was as Carrie White in the horror film “Carrie”, for which she earned her first Academy Award nomination. Sissy was born in Texas, moving to New York after graduating from high school. She was greatly affected by the death of her eighteen-year old brother Robbie in 1967. In total, she has been nominated for an Oscar six times, and won for Best Actress in 1980 for her role as country star Loretta Lynn in “Coal Miner’s Daughter”. She received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2011. Sissy is married to production designer and art director Jack Fisk, and has two daughters, Schuyler and Madison.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: The New Luxury – Water

 

In many emerging nations, children are starving and dying due to lack of clean water.  As a developednation, it certainly doesnt seem that advanced for us to be getting water for free when there appears to be a plenitude of it.  Meanwhile, two million people in the developing world are dying every year because they cant access clean water.

 

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Maybe we wont have water fountains in the future. Maybe that just doesnt make senseand people might be forced to buy bottled water, because it is a cherished, expensive and rare commodity. Quite soon, and even by certain nations, water already is the new diamond.  And the only challenge here is that diamonds are optional.  This high-end commodityis not something we can go without.

 

 

 

 

Its where our society is now realizing that the most expensive, prized and honored possessions in our world are things that we actually cannot possesswater must be used and reobtained and used again.  Unlike diamonds, it cant fit in our jewelry box, where we take it out whenever we so desire.  Its beauty rests in livelihood.

 

 

 

 

Further, its beauty rests in the continuation of life.

Our new luxuriesare now things that we must use to survive.  They are things that must be used frequently, and they must be sought out and obtained on a daily basis.  Our new luxury is about survival.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Look Deeply and Recognize the Real Enemy” – Thich Nhat Hanh

“If I can say anything to you, it is to invite you to look deeply and recognize the real enemy. The enemy is not a person. That enemy is a way of thinking that has brought a lot of suffering for everyone.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh

Anything negative — is not from a person.

Radical thinking?  It shouldn’t be.   If we view the enemy as simply a thought and not a person, we depersonalize it.   It’s temporary, changeable.   And we allow the person to grow beyond it, rather than be it.

We can then eliminate personal offense, and work constructively towards a solution.

Look at the Why

If something seems to be negative, we can encourage ourselves to look at “the why.” Why might someone think, or take action, in this way?   This offers us an opportunity to develop empathy. Perhaps this person—let’s call her Jeanine—came from a difficult circumstance or has been hurt.

It’s not Jeanine who is “bad,” but the experiences which occurred in her life which impacted her.  It’s those events that led to the thinking and action behind negativity.

So Jeanine’s identity is not “Prejudice”, “Anger” or “Hurt”:

It’s instead:

The most beautiful thing about this is the following.

She can change.

Allow her to do so.  Wouldn’t we all wish to be forgiven for a past action?

Happy PeopleEvery day we can begin again.   We can embrace a fresh purity for each person in our lives, allowing us and others to lives to our fullest – with Love.

                                                                             —✶—

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Buddhist monk and Zen master.  He is a well-known poet, writer and peace activist.  A native of Vietnam, during the Vietnam War he helped found the “engaged Buddhism” movement, combining the contemplative practice of the monastery with active ministry to victims of the conflict.  He founded the School of Youth Social Service, a Buddhist University, a publishing house, and a Vietnamese peace activist magazine.

During a trip to the United States, Thich Nhat Hanh persuaded Martin Luther King, Jr. to publicly oppose the Vietnam War; King subsequently nominated him for a Nobel Peace Prize.  Thich Nhat Hanh led the Buddhist delegation to the Paris Peace Talks.

Thich Nhat Hanh is the author of more than 85 books on mindfulness and peace.  He founded the Plum Village community in France, a Buddhist community in exile.   He continues to live and work at the Plum Village, and leads retreats worldwide on “the art of mindful living.”

The Pamela Positive: Dag Hammarskjold Gives Hope to the World

Dag Hammarskjold was such a wonderful model of what the U.N. can be and do.  As Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1953 to 1961, Hammarskjold was known for his unrelenting energy in striving to create fairness, harmony, peace and collaboration in many corners of our world.  He represented hope and reconciliation for so many.

Hammarskjold flew around the world to try to help so many countries needing support–and independent of whether there was an economic interest there, as it should be.  He acted as a force for the U.N., representing fair involvement for all countries: for example, during one Arab crisis in 1958, the U.S. and Britain sent troops to help Lebanon and Jordan. But Hammarskjold was able to get removal of these troops, and one-sided involvement in the crisis, to stop. He then brokered Egypt lifting its blockade of Syria (which would not join the Arab League.)

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In the 1950s he helped obtain the release of U.S. airmen held captive in China. In approaching the Suez Crisis, when Egypt nationalized the canal, Hammarskjold was able to broker French, British and Egyptian collaboration to keep it open.  Meanwhile, Israel attacked Egypt and the peace process was upset.  With Mr. Hammarskjold’s leadership, U.N. Forces were able to maintain a peaceful solution until a longer term solution was reached.  Laos faced extreme danger and he was able to place UN representatives there, which provided watchful protection.  He became part of a very longterm process against apartheid, meeting several times with the Union of South Africa and striving to open up attitudes of equality and fairness regarding race.

Hammarskjold’s last challenge was the crisis in the Congo where violent civil war was ensuing. Here he had brokered leaders to  meet in neutral territory to resolve the conflict.   Unfortunately, his plane was shot down and he did not survive.

Dag Hammarskjold was mourned by the world. He was seen as an extremely strong leader led by principles; absolutely tireless and needing little sleep. It was as if he were “on call” for the world.

“The world in which I grew up in was dominated by principles and ideals…I inherited a belief that no life was more satisfactory than one of selfless service to your country or humanity.  This sacrifice required a sacrifice of all personal interests, but likewise the courage to stand up unflinchingly for your convictions.”

Hammarskjold also created a meditation room or peace room in the U.N.  It is a place only for thoughts, no words, and embraces all types of prayers.  There is a stone in the middle of the room with nothing on it, and yet a shaft of light shines directly there. It is dedicated as an altar to harmony and freedom that is worshipped in many forms, by different countries and peoples, in many varied ways all over the world.