Tag Archives: world change

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Days Of Linear Giving Are Over

 

The days of “linear giving” are over — what I mean is, it’s not “I give you this, you give me that.”  That’s Linear Giving and it doesn’t always happen.

 

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First, you can’t truly give with the expectation that you are going to get something in return.  It’s just not the right motivation. And it will upset the balance of giving, turning it into something it’s not…

 

 

We need to give because we sincerely want to. Because it’s the right thing to do. It’s helpful, kind, nourishing to the world. And ultimately it does help ourselves… we feel nourished and uplifted by the mere act of being generous.

And it won’t stop there. More goodwill continues to come to you, in ways you never expected. From different places, different sources, and in unique ways! It’s truly quite exciting…to see good unfold when we let it go.

 

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So let’s not give and expect back. It’s not A gives to B, and B to gives to A.

It’s A gives to B. And then A gives to C and D. Then X, M, Q, and V give back to A at different times and ways in the future.

 

 

It’s circular, spherical, timeless, unbound, ever-connected giving… which is taking place, and always has been.


Fig¹. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels  Fig². Photo by fauxels on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Got My Start by Giving Myself a Start.” – Madam C.J. Walker

 

In the 1900s, Madam C.J. Walker made her mark for black women (and all women) by becoming the first African-American self-made millionaire in America.  She had a problem herself; in setting out to solve it, she helped others.

Madam Walker was losing some of her hair. So she created a hair product company that addressed this need, while helping women feel stronger, prouder, more beautiful. She was a millionaire within fifteen years.

 

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Yet it wasn’t just enhancing women’s beauty and self-esteem that made her unique. She employed thousands of women; she shone with brilliance by being a great CEO. And she left us with some inspiring mottos by which she lived her life.

Two of my favorites are:

 

“I got my start by giving myself a start.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Photography of a Man And Woman Laughing

“I had to make my own living and my own opportunity. But I made it! Don’t sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Go “start” whatever you would love to do. It can be small, it can be on the side, it can be modest. But begin today. You will know yourself more, giving of your “only-you” talents.  You will also be providing opportunities and inspiration for others.

 


In honor of Black History month, we honor Madam C.J. Walker. She was the first self-made American millionaire who was African-American or female. Her own hair loss inspired her to experiment with home remedies, and then sell them throughout the country. She began by selling Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower, a healing conditioner for scalps. She traveled door-to-door throughout the South and Southeast to sell her products. Her corporation employed as many as 3,000 people at one point. Madam Walker also founded Lelia College to train “hair culturists,” assisting other black women to start their own businesses. She was a Civil Rights activist and philanthropist.

Madam Walker had a daughter, A’Lelia Walker. She became president of her mother’s company in 1919 and remained in that position until her death in August 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Wikimedia Commons  Fig². Photo by Min An on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Can You Use and Reuse Paper?

 

We can live consciously and thoughtfully about how we use paper.

When you write a note, could you also reuse it again, and use the other side? When you receive a card, is there a portion of it that’s not written on, that could be used for a casual note to a roommate, spouse or friend?

 

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Or perhaps you could even use it for a to-do list. When you receive a box of a recent book or item of clothing, you can save it for holiday gifts. Let’s think creatively about our trees…

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE.”

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela, that’s a TREE. We can’t hurt the trees!”

 

A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6 and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

 

macro shot photography of tree during daytime

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.”

Anyone who doesn’t have hope for our future should rethink. What a wonderful opening our world is facing where we teach elementary kids the connection between paper and our living trees…to be conscious of conserving, so that Lindsey and others grow up with conservation being a natural part of their lives.

There is a new standard of living being created, and not only our youth, but our elementary school children, are leading the way.

 


Fig¹. Photo by David Vig on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE”

 

“Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, that’s a TREE. We can’t hurt the trees!”

 

 

A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6, and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

 

 

macro shot photography of tree during daytime

 

 

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.”

Anyone who doesn’t have hope for our future should rethink. What a wonderful opening our world is facing where we teach elementary kids the connection between paper and our living trees…to be conscious of conserving, so that Lindsey and others grow up with conservation being a natural part of their lives.

There is a new standard of living being created, and not only our youth, but our elementary school children, are leading the way.

 

 


Citation:

Fig¹. David Vig on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Look Deeply and Recognize the Real Enemy” – Thich Nhat Hanh

 

“If I can say anything to you, it is to invite you to look deeply and recognize the real enemy. The enemy is not a person. That enemy is a way of thinking that has brought a lot of suffering for everyone.”

– Thich Nhat Hanh

 

Anything negative — is not from a person.

 

Radical thinking? It shouldn’t be. If we view the enemy as simply a thought and not a person, we depersonalize it. It’s temporary, changeable. And we allow the person to grow beyond it, rather than be it.

 

We can then eliminate personal offense, and work constructively towards a solution.

 

Look at the Why

 

If something seems to be negative, we can encourage ourselves to look at “the why.” Why might someone think, or take action, in this way?  This offers us an opportunity to develop empathy. Perhaps this person—let’s call her Jeanine—came from a difficult circumstance or has been hurt.

 

It’s not Jeanine who is “bad,” but the experiences which occurred in her life which impacted her. It’s those events that led to the thinking and action behind negativity.

 

 

 

 

So Jeanine’s identity is not “Prejudice”, “Anger” or “Hurt”:

 

 

 

 

It’s instead:

 

 

The most beautiful thing about this is the following.

 

She can change.

 

Allow her to do so. Wouldn’t we all wish to be forgiven for a past action?

 

 

Happy People

 

 

Every day we can begin again.   We can embrace a fresh purity for each person in our lives, allowing us and others to lives to our fullest – with Love.


 

 

 

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Buddhist monk and Zen master.  He is a well-known poet, writer and peace activist.  A native of Vietnam, during the Vietnam War he helped found the “engaged Buddhism” movement, combining the contemplative practice of the monastery with active ministry to victims of the conflict.  He founded the School of Youth Social Service, a Buddhist University, a publishing house, and a Vietnamese peace activist magazine.

During a trip to the United States, Thich Nhat Hanh persuaded Martin Luther King, Jr. to publicly oppose the Vietnam War; King subsequently nominated him for a Nobel Peace Prize.  Thich Nhat Hanh led the Buddhist delegation to the Paris Peace Talks.

Thich Nhat Hanh is the author of more than 85 books on mindfulness and peace. He founded the Plum Village community in France, a Buddhist community in exile. He continues to live and work at the Plum Village, and leads retreats worldwide on “the art of mindful living.”

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: May Your Work Bring Just and Lasting Peace

 

President Lincoln advised us…

 

“Whatever work you are devoted to….may it bring just and lasting peace.”

 

Our respected President Abraham Lincoln brought this to light in his 1865 Inaugural Address. What a calling for each of us to think, as we go about our work each day, how it can bring “just and lasting peace.”  And I think work here is not just our professional work, but any task to which we are devoting ourselves.  Any project, endeavor, activity — from raising a child to decorating a Valentine’s Day wreath — can have kindness, justice and peace as a necessary ingredient to our performing of it.

 

 

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President Lincoln says something instrumental here: As we strive for our goal, it should be peace brought between each one us, and then also with all countries. The point here is that gentle justice, no matter how small, and a caring, kind sense of peacefulness in all our interactions, bring that sense of worldwide peace. And it must start with ourselves, our conversations, our actions between each person we meet. That’s a great calling for us in living rightly every day!

 

 


 

 

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865) served as the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War and in so doing, preserved the Union, ended slavery, strengthened the national government. He promoted rapid modernization of the economy through banks, canals, railroads and tariffs to encourage the building of factories. He is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. 

The second child of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Lincoln,  Abraham was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s. Married to Mary Todd in 1842, he was an affectionate husband and father of four children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Abraham_Lincoln