Tag Archives: work

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving™. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me–and for my organization.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Find The People Who Can Make You A Better Person.” – Ted Danson

 

             “My philosophy is, don’t hang on to whatever degree of success or celebrity you have,” he explains. “Find the smartest people you can and work with them, even if it means taking a smaller role. Get lost in something that inspires you. Find the people who can make you a better person. That’s how you stay fresh.”

– Ted Danson

 

 

How true is this. You always want to find great people with whom to work! Then you excel, soar, float and can contribute to the world even more strongly.

 

Did you know that people who love what they do are 50% more likely to report being rated as meeting or exceeding expectations at work?1 And it follows that people who work around likeminded people with similar values are more likely to stay.  You have work you love, and people that you love.  A great (and sometimes rare) combination!

 

 

 

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Looking for it? Match up with a good-hearted, values-based team, doing something that you love. Then, identify organizations doing something you love.  Or, you can donor vice versa!  With both in mind, at some point, both will fall into place.

 

 

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You’ll learn, grow, and ascend. You will make the world better.

Plus it’s so much more fun!

Live With Great People

Everyday,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

Ted Danson, born Edward Bridge Danson, is an American actor who first became well known for his character Sam Malone on the hit sitcom, Cheers. He’s also starred on CBS’s CSI, HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm, and NBC’s The Good Place. Throughout his career, he’s won two Emmy’s, three Golden Globe Awards, and many more accolades. Outside of his acting career, Mr. Danson also is an environmentalist and released his book Oceana: Our Endangered Oceans and What We Can Do to Save Them in 2011. His father was an anthropology and director of a Native American museum, which led to Ted’s love of nature. Since then, he’s also helped found the American Oceans Campaign, which is now known as Oceana. He’s married to Mary Steenburger, and has two children.

 

Citations:
Hagel, John; Seely Brown, John; Ranjan, Alok; and Byler, Daniel, “Passion at Work”, Deloitte Insights, October 2014, https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/topics/talent/worker-passion-employee-behavior.html
Fig. 1: Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

“Love Many, Trust a Few, And Always Paddle Your Own Canoe”

 

–Terri, from Coudersport, PA, as seen on Dark Chocolate Dove Wrapper

 

Terri has it right. What a joy to enjoy dark chocolate, which I love, with a truly inspired quote.

 

 

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Life affords us so many ways to love, and how important we keep doing so. At the same time, we have to be careful, and so Trust, or entrusting ourselves to others, perhaps must be a bit more rare.  I wish it weren’t so… however, everyone is on their pathway of personal growth. So we must honor them, honor ourselves: We should always love, but not necessarily entrust to others.

 

As far as paddling one’s own canoe. As my Oma says, “You’d better put a little elbow grease into that.” She was always ensuring she had pulled her weight. In fact, when I went over to Oma’s for a sleepover as a young child, even at the age of 8 or 9, our fun together — was working together. We scrubbed the kitchen floor on hands and knees, sharpened pencils, and wrote up a list for the freezer so she knew what was in there. She taught me to care about being clean, ordered and organized, which made her home special. She made it fun. I loved working with my Oma.

 

 

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Terri, we thank you for a quote which has delighted us all!

The Classic Pamela Positive: Communicate With More Than Words

 

It is so amazing to me that when we communicate, the words really ‘come in third place.’

What’s first and second?

 

 

 

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First is the tone. If we are abrasive, affrontive, sarcastic then it doesn’t open up the conversation and action for change.

Calm, proactive, inclusive, even — “slow” — conversations help provide dynamic change. It sounds as if it is an oxymoron. But allowing the participants to breathe in the interaction helps bring about the best and most inclusive solutions for all parties.

 

 

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Second then is body language. If our body is open, or hunched over, our shoulders upright or slumped, communicates a world of information! And yes, most significantly is your “face language.” A frown or a smile will tell all, and make or break someone’s day!

 

 

 

smile!

 

 

Third come the words. This is actually not our main way to communicate. For us, we must take care that tone and face and body communicate positivity.  There are no words that will make up for a frown. 🙂

 

So yes, choose your words carefully and positively, and match them with a welcoming posture and smile.

 

Now, you are on your way to being a great communicator!

 

Communicate Positively, 

Pamela

The Classic Pamela Positive: Tell Your Team They Are Great and DON’T Give Them Anything To Do 

 

One of the most powerful things you can do to recognize someone on your team is to call them and thank them and say Youre doing a wonderful job today, and I wanted to thank you. Thats it. I just wanted you to know, and for you to take the time to recognize it. Please know how much I appreciate your consistent work and positive attitude.” 

 

 

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Do not add on a to do.

I know thats tempting as we as CEOs have a lot we want to accomplish! But just let the conversation rest in genuine appreciation.

Its one of the best ways you can thank someone without agenda.

 

 

 The Classic Pamela Positive: In Order to Love, You Must First Learn

“The greatest of human emotions is love. The most valuable of human gifts is the ability to learn. Therefore learn to love.”

 

 – UJ Ramdas

 

 

Oh! Dear Leaders today… may we embrace this lovely admonition. Our life is a beautiful life, at home at work, in the depths of despair, in the positive celebrations. We must continue to learn, and continue to love.

 

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I will share this story with you. Early on in my work life, I was running my second company around age 31? 32? And my heart was all in it. It was my calling; it was UniversalGiving. And had worked very hard to get it off the ground.

 

We were building the team, and it was a young team. Like me… so some were only a few years younger than me, or my age! What to do.

 

Kindness was key for me. That’s what I grew up with in my home, and I didn’t know any differently. But now, there were points of difference. People wanted things done a certain way, weren’t gracious in their conversation, or they didn’t want to work as much, but we we’re still in startup mode and needed that extra effort in the beginning (in the long-run though, I highly believe in balance!) And I cowtowed.

 

Because kindness ruled my day, I let that lead everything.

 

I let them do most everything they wanted, to maintain harmony.

 

But there wasn’t.

 

And I got walked on. And tremendously hurt.

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And they spoke down to me. And I let it happen.

 

 

There were no boundaries.

 

 

And they lost respect for me.

 

And they left.

 

And I really, really hurt.

 

I was staying with my values of kindness, yet, it was a permissiveness that was not actually loving. Love can be strong, and kind, and with boundaries. So I had to learn.

 

This is why I highly agree with UJ Ramdas. We must love– but we must learn. I learned to love in higher, different way– one based on kindness, firmness and adherance to my values. And with that, my respect for myself — and others’ respect for me — returned. And I could rebuild the team.

 

If you have a challenge today, seek out what you need to learn, and how you need to love. That’s how we can be our best leadership self. Don’t wait — we start today.  (:

 


 

UJ Ramdas brings together his passion for psychology and business to create a better world. Along with Alex Ikon, he co-created the “Five Minute Journal” with the goal to enable people to be happier in five minutes a day. With a background in behavioral science, marketing, and hypnosis he consults with hundreds of clients to bring them out of confusion into clarity. Currently based in Toronto, Canada, he is a huge fan of wilderness, eastern meditative practices, and a good cup of tea. You can visit his website by clicking here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Not As An Emblem Of Suffering…But As An Example Of Faithfulness” -Mennonite Phrase

“Not as an emblem of suffering, but as an example of faithfulness in the midst of suffering. Job never doubted God.”

-Mennonite Phrase

We are faithful in anything in life — our work, our family, our duties, not simply to do it. We do it because we cherish the values they represent, or, it supports the people we love.

 

 

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We go to work because we are impassioned by it and how we can make the world better, whether you are an international diplomat or a garbage man who helps keep our streets and health safe. We are faithful to cherish others, such as showing up for our grandson’s game or niece’s game, because we love them and want to nurture that love. Most importantly, we have faith in God because we trust that He/She has the best plan for us.  So if we love our work and love our families, shouldn’t we love an all Powerful God the most?

 

 


 

 

The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptists named after Menno Simons (1496–1561). His teachings were a relatively minor influence on the group, though. They are of the historic peace churches. Mennonites are committed to nonviolence, nonviolent resistance/reconciliation, and pacifism.  There are about 1.5 million Mennonites worldwide as of 2006. There are many different types of mennonite communities in the world. There are those that dress in old-fashioned ways, and others which are hard to tell apart from other people leading a modern lifestyle. Most Mennonites are in the United States and Democratic Republic of Congo, but Mennonites can also be found in tight-knit communities in at least 51 countries on six continents or scattered amongst the populace of those countries.

Mennonites have an international distinction among Christian denominations in disaster relief. They also place a strong theological emphasis on voluntary service. Mennonite Disaster Service, based in North America, provides both immediate and long-term responses to hurricanes, floods, and other disasters. Mennonite Central Committee provides disaster relief around the world alongside their long-term international development programs. Other programs offer a variety of relief efforts and services throughout the world.  In the last few decades some Mennonite groups have also become more actively involved with peace and social justice issues, helping to found Christian Peacemaker Teams and Mennonite Conciliation Service.