Tag Archives: Volunteer

The Pamela Positive: “Go Instantly And Do The Thing” – Phillip Brooks

 

“If you could only know and see and feel, all of a sudden, that ‘the time is short,’ how it would break the spell. How you would go instantly and do the thing, which you might never have another chance to do!”

―Phillip Brooks

 

architektura-clovek-muz-odlesk-1777792.jpg

 

There is no time to hesitate. Do you see a way that you can go good? Then we must do it now.

Slow down to help someone across the street.

I know it’s hard, but let someone in front of you on the highway.

Smile to someone who is waiting at the bus stop.

Save part of your dinner and bring it over to your neighbor, unexpectedly.

Be warm, be kind, even when you feel stressed.

 

Soldier Giving Red Fruit on 2 Children during Daytime

 

Time to do good now. You will find a way. Look and the opportunities abound to give back, give forward, give all around.  

Give Where We Can Today,

Pamela

 


Phillips Brooks (December 13, 1835 – January 23, 1893) was an American Episcopal clergyman and author, long the Rector of Boston’s Trinity Church and briefly Bishop of Massachusetts, and particularly remembered as the lyricist of the Christmas hymn, O Little Town of Bethlehem.

Born in Boston, Brooks was descended through his father, William Gray Brooks, from the Rev. John Cotton; through his mother, Mary Ann Phillips, he was a great-grandson of Samuel Phillips, Jr., founder of Phillips Academy (Andover, Massachusetts). Three of Brooks’ five brothers – Frederic, Arthur and John Cotton – were eventually ordained in the Episcopal Church. Phillips Brooks prepared for college at the Boston Latin School and graduated from Harvard University in 1855 at the age of 20, where he was elected to the A.D. Club. He worked briefly as a school teacher at Boston Latin.

During the American Civil War, he upheld the cause of the North and opposed slavery, and his sermon on the death of Abraham Lincoln was an eloquent expression of the character of both men. His sermon at Harvard’s commemoration of the Civil War dead in 1865 likewise attracted attention nationwide. Brooks’s understanding of individuals and of other religious traditions gained a following across a broad segment of society, as well as increased support for the Episcopal Church. Within his lifetime, he received honorary degrees from Harvard (1877) and Columbia (1887), and the Doctor of Divinity degree by the University of Oxford, England (1885).

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Juliano Ferreira on Pexels  Fig². Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away From The Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

photo-1500917832468-298fa6292e2b.jpeg

 

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

photo-1491236149350-54bdab98dc14.jpeg

 

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights. You inspire!

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Bobby Burch on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Erik Dungan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Greatest Mind is Always the Simplest.” – Russell Conwell

 

 

Now, the greatest mind is always the simplest.

Did you ever see a really great man?

Great in the best and truest sense?

If so, you could walk right up to him and say:

“How are you, Jim?”

 

—Russell Conwell

 

 

selective focus photo of man waving in vehicle

 

 

That’s right. The most amazing people are warm and accessible to all. That’s because they know everyone has a beautiful gift to give, and no one is greater. The greatest gift is being open and loving.

 

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio source: Wikipedia


Citation:

Fig¹. JuniperPhoton on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Sail Away from the Safe Harbor” —Mark Twain

 

 

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”

—Mark Twain

 

 

photo-1500917832468-298fa6292e2b.jpeg

 

 

Its okay to feel safe. In some ways, we need to feel safe as a launching pad, knowing that someone believes in us. And from that harbor, we can and should launch into spectacular venues where we push ourselves out of our comfort zone. You will grow and be inspired in ways you could never imagine. You inspire.

 

 

photo-1491236149350-54bdab98dc14.jpeg

 

 

For those of you who dream and discover starting from shaky ground, you have a courage that will carry you through to new heights and insights.  You inspire!

 

 


Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens, in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835. He was the sixth child in his family. In 1847, his father died, which caused his family to fall into poverty. This would shape Clemens’ writing and how he viewed the world. To help support his family, he began working as a printer at age 12.

In July 1961, he headed out west where he would eventually find steady work as a reporter for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In his writing, he presented an honest, yet satirical portrayal of the antebellum south. His criticisms of the south, such as in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, cried out against racist attitudes. He led an exciting life as a ferry boat driver and a prospector during the Gold Rush; his experiences enhanced his understanding of the American culture which he wrote about.

In 1870, he married Olivia Langdon and the couple settled in Buffalo, New York with their four children. 

Biosource: Wikipedia


Citations:

Fig¹. Bobby Burch on Unsplash

Fig². Erik Dungan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: How You Can Be A Family That Gives Back, Part One

 

 

Often we think about giving in a solitary way. It’s just us giving.

We are approached by nonprofits and we give. We see a cause, and we give.

 

 

aaron-burden-211846-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

But you can have a greater impact if you do one thing: include others. Most importantly, include your family.

 

 

gustavo-alves-669854-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

When you give solo, you are making an impact. But when you share it with others, as a lesson, an inspiration, and as a humble manifestation of good, you are helping the world. You are helping other members of your family see good taking place. Then, it can become a habit. Others will see that as a model of how one should live. They will naturally give.

 

Here’s some practical tips on how your family can give during the holidays or any time of year. Please share with us what you did!

 

1. Model Early

 

Certainly, a humble attitude regarding giving is always appreciated. When people speak about a long list of their giving, it can be about bravado.

 

With family, it’s different. Your 4-year old, 6-year-old, 18-year-old… whatever age they are… will understand it and absorb it. So begin gently sharing how you dropped off a meal for a single mom; donated clothes to the neighbor down the street; or quietly funded a scholarship. All of these actions make a difference. If your child sees this is the norm, he, she, they, or we will do it too.

 

 

tyler-nix-504391-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

2. Come Up With Your Family Values

Have a dialogue at the family table about what’s important to your family. Is it love? Truth? Doing the right thing, being selfless, slowing down, listening, helping others…? You can decide as a family and make sure that you have that up on an inspirational white board, bulletin board, or chalk board that you can point to. You can read before you sit down for your meals. Have a vision for the type of family you want to be, serving with the world and your local community.

Next, come up with your values. You don’t need more than three. They might be Grace, telling the truth, and loving kindness.  You can always change them but it’s important to start living and practicing them. You can then talk about it at the table. What did you do today to really live these values?

 

 

ty-williams-466945-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Is this philanthropy? You bet it is. The definition of philanthropy by Merriam-Webster is

“goodwill to fellow members of the human race” 

which also means loving people. Loving people is the purest form of philanthropy. It’s from the Latin philanthropia, which is defined by loving people:

Phil (Love) + Anthrōpos (human being).

 

Untitled design (3) (1).jpg

 

3. Make A Statement

Now, you’re ready to allow your young ones to make a statement. And they might not be young ones? Many of us live in larger families or blended families. Perhaps everyone gets an “allowance” to do good, not just teens.

 

 

sharon-mccutcheon-556371-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

4. Give Your Time

Perhaps one of the most precious things in our busy, Silicon Valley and global world is our time. How we spend it makes a statement. Are you volunteering? It’s great to take your time to do this with other family members.

You might see dad go to be a banker in the morning or go to work at Bapco construction on the street. But when you’re volunteering, you’re all working together, replanting the garden, or serving meals to homeless individuals. By giving back together, everyone is doing the same thing to create a greater good. And it’s been proven if your family volunteers together, “the children felt cheered up,” and they “respected their parents more.”2 Those are two great, family bonding reasons!

 

Everyone should set aside an allowance from your savings or be given it from their parents and talk about what they did that week at the dinner table. It’s basically a spending account, for the world. Right now, just over 60% of parents provide an allowance.1 Be a part of a movement to give your family an allowance to help the world!

 

 

val-vesa-624638-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

So get out there and volunteer and be a stronger family.

I hope these have helped you understand how to live a more impactful life and how to truly give. It’s not just about

 

 

rawpixel-570908-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

It’s about the

 

 

jon-tyson-762642-unsplash (1) (1) (1).jpg

 

 

Let’s Be Living And Giving,

Pamela

 

 

 


Citations:
1Fabbri, Briana, “Allowance in America: When, Why & How Much We Pay Our Kids”, NetCredit, published on September 11, 2013,https://www.netcredit.com/blog/allowance-in-america/
2 Littlepage, Laura, “Family Volunteering: An Exploratory Study of the Impact of Families”, Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, 2003, https://archives.iupui.edu/bitstream/handle/2450/438/31_03-C05_Family_Volunteering.pdf?sequence=1
Fig. 1: Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Gustavo Alves on Unsplash
Fig. 3: Photo by Tyler Nix on Unsplash
Fig. 4: Photo by Ty Williams on Unsplash
Fig. 5: Flyer created on Canva
Fig. 6: Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash
Fig. 7: Photo by Val Vesa on Unsplash
Fig. 8: Photo by Rawpixel on Unsplash
Fig. 9: Photo by Jon Tyson on Unsplash