Tag Archives: Values

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Enjoy When You Can, Endure When You Must”

 

“Enjoy when you can, and endure when you must.” 

 

— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Two grand lessons today: Enjoy and Persevere.

 

 

 

 

There is so much to enjoy… and so important that we focus on it.  It can be easy to be distracted into something that isn’t working, when we really should enjoy and relish what is before us.  It need not be a big event. It can be a small gratitude.

 

 

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Then, too, there are times to patiently persevere.  Not all is easy, peaceful; at times we must stay the course, step by step, like a diligent marathon runner, committed to her course, unrelenting until the final finish line.  It might not be a quick race, but more a matter of a marathon.

 

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766 he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Have to Be Able to Tell People ‘Great Job’ on Things That Didn’t Work”

 

“You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

— J. Kermit Campbell, former CEO of Herman Miller

 

 

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Campbell has it right.  A CEO is not an expert except in one area: getting the right people. Actually, let’s add another area: values. You must be a leader who gets the best people and demonstrates the highest values.

Even if you are a manager, you should still think this way. Empower your people to learn and maintain a domain of expertise. Hopefully, you can hire them with it. If you can’t, make sure they have the rapid capability to do so.  Let’s learn from Campbell’s advice to us:

“I don’t believe that my job is to lead design at Herman Miller.  My job is to make sure we have great design leaders, continue to listen and try to learn from them…My job is not to be a creative guy, my job is to create a culture that allows and promotes creativity…

You’re going to have to take risks. It’s not all going to work.

You have to be able to tell people ‘great job’ on things that didn’t work.”

 

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J. Kermit Campbell is a former CEO of Herman Miller, and the current Lead Independent Director of SPX Corporation.  He is an investor or board member for a number of companies and charitable organizations.  Herman Miller is a leading furniture company, founded by D. J. DePree, with a more than 100-year history.  They focus on innovation, and designing products to create a better world.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Fit Soul” – Dominic Novak

“I learned that a fit body is nothing without a fit soul.”

 

– Dominic Novak

 

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Dominic Novak is the President, owner and lead trainer of Peak Physique in Greenwich, Connecticut. He has been in the fitness industry, training clients, for over 25 years. He started Peak Physique, Inc in 1993, which is currently the largest personal training center on the East Coast. He holds a Bachelor’s of Science in Health Fitness from Springfield College. Dominic has trained athletes, celebrities and clients of all ages. His passion is guiding clients, helping them to reach their fitness goals with his steady persistence and tireless effort.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Dag Hammarskjold Gives Hope to the World

 

Dag Hammarskjold was such a wonderful model of what the U.N. can be and do. As Secretary-General of the United Nations from 1953 to 1961, Hammarskjold was known for his unrelenting energy given to fairness, peace and collaboration. He represented hope and reconciliation throughout many corners of our world.

 

Hammarskjold supported countries whether or not there was an economic interest, as it should be.  Equitable involvement for all countries was his philosophy.

 

 

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For example in the Suez Crisis, when Egypt nationalized the canal, Hammarskjold was able to broker French, British and Egyptian collaboration to keep it open. Meanwhile, Israel attacked Egypt and the peace process was upset. With Mr. Hammarskjold’s leadership, U.N. Forces were able to maintain a peaceful solution until a longer term solution was reached.

 

In endangered Laos, he was able to place UN representatives there, which provided watchful protection. He also became part of a very long-term process against apartheid, meeting several times with the Union of South Africa, opening up attitudes of equality and fairness regarding race.

 

 

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Hammarskjold’s last challenge was the crisis in the Congo where violent civil war was ensuing. Here he had brokered leaders meeting in neutral territory to resolve the conflict. Unfortunately, his plane was shot down and he did not survive.

 

Dag Hammarskjold was mourned by the world. He was seen as an extremely strong leader led by principles; tireless and needing little sleep.

 

 

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It was as if he were “on call” for the world.

 

“The world in which I grew up in was dominated by principles and ideals…I inherited a belief that no life was more satisfactory than one of selfless service to your country or humanity.  This sacrifice required a sacrifice of all personal interests, but likewise the courage to stand up unflinchingly for your convictions.”

 

 

 

Hammarskjold also created a meditation room or peace room in the U.N.  It is a place only for thoughts, no words, and embraces all types of prayers.  There is a stone in the middle of the room with nothing on it, and yet a shaft of light shines directly there.  It is dedicated as an altar to harmony and freedom that is worshipped in many forms, by different countries and peoples, in many varied ways all over the world.

 

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Dag Hammarskjold was an economist and diplomat who was the second Secretary-General of the United Nations. He was born in Jönköping and grew up in Uppsala. His father was Hjalmar Hammarskjöld, the Prime Minister of Sweden from 1914 to 1917. By the age of 25, he had already received a Licentiate of Philosophy and his Master of Laws degree. After receiving his Ph.D. in Economics, Hammarskjold began serving his country in various roles from state secretary in the Ministry of Finance to being vice chairman of of the Swedish delegation to the United Nations General Assembly. In becoming Secretary-General, he received an unexpected nomination from the Secretary Council (with China abstaining) and he surprised everyone with his knowledge of the United Nations’ affairs when accepting his nominations. He’s widely considered to be one of the two best Secretary-Generals of the United Nations. During his tenure, he made sure to promote peace and equality both within and outside the United Nations. Hammarskjold promoted peace in Congo and he was unexpectedly killed en route to a trip there. After his death, he was rewarded a Nobel Prize. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Personal Happiness Lives in the Realization That……” – J.K. Rowling

“Personal happiness lives in the realization that life is not a checklist of personal acquisition or achievement; your qualifications, your CV, are not your life, though you will meet many people of my age and older that confuse the two.”

– J.K. Rowling

 

What an important statement to read over, again and again and again. Team Living and Giving, you really need to know who you are.

 
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You are vibrant, strong, positive. Or perhaps you are kind, soft and caring.  You are smart from school, street smart, or heart smart – in some way you are smart!  You help your neighbor, run an errand for your mom, bake cookies for your kids, or pull up another seat at the dinner table for an unexpected guest.  That’s being the best you.

We take J.K. Rowling’s beautiful reminder to be all who we are.  To focus on our qualities, not just on our resume. That’s how we can be happy, and give the best happiness, to others.

 

Enjoy Your Life,

Pamela

 

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J.K. Rowling is a British author, most well-known for her fantasy series Harry Potter. She grew up in a village, Winterbourne, with her younger sister and parents. Her childhood was turbulent and she turned to writing fantasy stories to share with her sister as an escape. She attended the University of Exeter, where she received her B.A. in French and Classics. She was into pop music while growing up and she also studied abroad in France for a year while in college. In 1990, she began writing the Harry Potter series, but she soon moved to Portugal to teach English. In Portugal, she met her former husband and she had one child with him. After the divorce, she moved with her young child, Jessica, to Edinburgh, Scotland to be near her sister. Throughout her difficult times, she turned to writing the novel to positively channel her energy. She finished the first book of the series in 1995 and in 1997, the book was published. From there, Rowling would receive awards and grants that allowed her to continue writing the novels. The last four books of the series broke records as the fastest-selling books in history and the brand is estimated to be valued at $15 billion dollars. In 2001, she remarried to Neil Murray and the two have a son together. She started her own charity in 2000, called Volant Charitable Trust that aims to eradicate poverty and social inequality. She is also the president of the charity Gingerbread. She gives to a number of causes including research in multiple sclerosis.

The Classic Pamela Positive: We’re Going in Different Directions, No We’re Not

 

One morning as I was leaving for work, my mom and I had a very special interchange.  

 

We live in Menlo Park, and I was headed north to San Francisco.  My parents were headed south to Carmel for a bit of rest.  “Have a great day, Mom!  Thank you for having meand now were going in different directions!

 

 

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No, were not,” she said immediately.

I knew exactly what she meant.  Our minds and hearts are going in the same direction.   Shes taught me to be loving and kind.   To follow my heart, and to do what I love to do.  And to live rightly.   And that is what she does with her life. She is so consistently, joyously serving others.  Ive never seen a better model of this.

 

 

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And so, as we parted that morning, we went in the same direction.

The Classic Pamela Positive: What We Can Learn from the Gentle, Observant Jain Religion

 

Jainism is a group that believes we should leave barely a footprint on this earth. They believe in gentility, kindness, and care for every living creature. It’s even to the extent of not eating root vegetables, because pulling up the roots makes the plant die. Jains honor every living thing.

 

 

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Founded in a similar time frame as Buddhism, Jainism primarily existed in Hindu parts of India. In the present day it is a small but powerful minority among the world’s religions, with some 4 million followers in India and growing communities elsewhere in the world. A few core beliefs of Jainism include that every living being has a soul; non-violence is the path to right thinking; attachment to possessions should be limited, and one’s life should be lived to be useful to others.

 

May we be gentle, respectful and observant of the preciousness of life in all its form.