Tag Archives: Values

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do Great Deeds with Little Means” -Russell Conwell

 

“Greatness consists in doing great deeds with little means in the accomplishment of vast purposes.

It consists in the private ranks of life, in helping one’s fellows, in benefiting one’s neighborhood, in blessing one’s own city and state.”

―Russell Conwell

 

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It’s that simple.

Give Something Today,

Pamela

 


Russell Conwell (February 15, 1843 – December 6, 1925) was an American Baptist minister, orator, philanthropist, lawyer, and writer. He is best remembered as the founder and first president of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and for his inspirational lecture Acres of Diamonds. The son of Massachusetts farmers, Conwell attended Yale University and after graduating enlisted in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was ordained as a Baptist minister in 1880, and delivered his famous speech “Acres of Diamonds” over 6,000 times around the world. The central idea of the work is that one need not look elsewhere for opportunity, achievement, or fortune – the resources to achieve all good things are present in one’s own community. Conwell’s capacity to establish Temple University and his other civic projects largely derived from the income that he earned from the speech. The published version has been regarded as a classic of New Thought literature since the 1870s.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Nathan Lemon on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Positive Thoughts Become Your Words. -Mahatma Gandhi

 

“Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.”

―Mahatma Gandhi

 

Photo of Woman Looking at the Mirror

 

Positive thoughts Become your Words…

Positive Thoughts Become your Behavior…

Positive Thoughts Become your Habits…

Positive Thoughts Become your Values…

And Positive Thoughts Become your Destiny.

So, Keep Positive!

Keeping on the Positive Train of Thought,

Pamela

 


Mahatma Gandhi was a political and spiritual leader during the Indian Independence movement. He preached resistance through non-violence and mass civil disobedience. He led the Indian National Congress and advocated for the end of poverty, for women’s rights and for independence from Britain. He also renounced religious violence and did several fasts in protest against it. Gandhi was deeply inspired by his Hindu faith, while also drawing on other religious philosophy, and advocating religious tolerance. He married Kasturbai Gandhi and they had four children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, The Concept of Leadership


Fig¹.Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Everything You Need Is Already Inside.” – Bill Bowerman

 

Everything you need is already inside. Just do it.

– Bill Bowerman

 

man jumping above rock mountain

 

I love Bill Bowerman’s quote, as he speaks to the potential and belief in each one of us… We should always strive to be our best and to believe in ourselves, even if we don’t always achieve our immediate goal. The importance is in the process and our motives.

We should treat ourselves and others with the utmost care, meaning, “We believe!” The alternative is costly to our health, to what we can achieve, and to what the world will miss…

What I love is that Bill Bowerman translated this belief across many areas — personal values, sports training and business. Believing isn’t relegated to any sector!

 


Bill Bowerman was a track and field coach for the University of Oregon. Born in Portland, Oregon, Bowerman was raised in Fossil, Oregon by his mother after his parents split. In his childhood, he was part of the school band and the football team. He received his B.A. from the University of Oregon, where he studied journalism and played football. He also served in the military as a Major in the army during World War II. In his 24-year career he trained 31 Olympic athletes, twelve American record holders, 51 All-Americans and 24 NCAA champions. One year he won 4 NCAA titles. In 1964 he became the co-founder of Nike. He and his wife Barbara were high school sweethearts, married for more than 60 years and they had two children together. 

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Blake Cheek on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

Photo of Woman Raising Both Hands

 

Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best. You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 


John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach. He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children. After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “The Best Way Out Is Always Through” – Robert Frost

 

“The best way out is always through.”

― Robert Frost

 

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Our dear Poet has practical advice for us…. we must take a step forward. You might be facing a challenge but you must find the way through.

We don’t have to be overwhelmed… we can simply take one step. One step towards progress. One step towards harmony. One step towards resolution!

Thank you Robert Frost for simply encouraging us. You must take a step! And, you will make it through.

 

I’m Taking My Step,

Pamela

 


Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a highly-regarded poet known for his depiction of rural life. He published his first poem in high school. He attended Harvard but did not graduate due to illness; he received an honorary degree from Harvard posthumously, as well as more than 40 other honorary degrees. Though Frost grew up in the city, he lived on farms later in his life. He was a professor at Amherst College, and at Middlebury College for 42 years. Some of his best-known poems include “The Road Not Taken,” “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” and “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

This particular quote is from the poem “A Servant to Servants” (1914). Many of Frost’s poems explore the splendor of the outdoors. However, “A Servant to Servants” is a contrast to the typical Frostian nature poem. Its speaker is the wife of a hard-working farmer who feels trapped in her life that seems meaningless. She explains her monotonous daily routine. The poem is written in iambic pentameter, although it varies in meter with no apparent rhyme scheme. A constant symbol in this poem is nature representing freedom, but it is a freedom that the speaker cannot attain.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo from Wikimedia

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Not As An Emblem Of Suffering…But As An Example Of Faithfulness” -Mennonite Phrase

 

“Not as an emblem of suffering, but as an example of faithfulness in the midst of suffering. Job never doubted God.”

―Mennonite Phrase

 

We are faithful in anything in life ― our work, our family, our duties, not simply to do it. We do it because we cherish the values they represent, or, it supports the people we love.

 

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We go to work because we are impassioned by it and how we can make the world better, whether you are an international diplomat or a garbage man who helps keep our streets and health safe. We are faithful to cherish others, such as showing up for our grandson’s game or niece’s game, because we love them and want to nurture that love. Most importantly, we have faith in God because we trust that He/She has the best plan for us. So if we love our work and love our families, shouldn’t we love an all Powerful God the most?

 

Being Grateful to a Great God,

Pamela

 


The Mennonites are a group of Christian Anabaptists named after Menno Simons (1496–1561). His teachings were a relatively minor influence on the group, though. They are of the historic peace churches. Mennonites are committed to nonviolence, nonviolent resistance/reconciliation, and pacifism. There are about 1.5 million Mennonites worldwide as of 2006. There are many different types of Mennonite communities in the world. There are those that dress in old-fashioned ways, and others which are hard to tell apart from other people leading a modern lifestyle. Most Mennonites are in the United States and Democratic Republic of Congo, but Mennonites can also be found in tight-knit communities in at least 51 countries on six continents or scattered amongst the populace of those countries.

Mennonites have an international distinction among Christian denominations in disaster relief. They also place a strong theological emphasis on voluntary service. Mennonite Disaster Service, based in North America, provides both immediate and long-term responses to hurricanes, floods, and other disasters. Mennonite Central Committee provides disaster relief around the world alongside their long-term international development programs. Other programs offer a variety of relief efforts and services throughout the world.  In the last few decades some Mennonite groups have also become more actively involved with peace and social justice issues, helping to found Christian Peacemaker Teams and Mennonite Conciliation Service.

Bio Source: Wikipedia


Fig¹.  Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself – To Be Too Large For Worry… Part Ten of Ten

 

This is Part Ten of Ten in the Series on “The Classic Pamela Positive: Promise Yourself”.  Please click here to start from the beginning!

 

 

Promise Yourself

To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear, and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.

—Christian D. Larson

 

 

Promise Yourself is a beautiful list of 10 Positives we should “Promise Ourselves.”  The piece allows us to embrace life fully by expecting the best and clearing away anything that might hold us back.  It’s healthy for our minds and hearts.

 

 

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Here’s your tenth one, below.  I hope you will practice it with me today!  Please let me know your thoughts and how it affects your day, your life, and the people around you.

 

 


Christian D. Larson (1874 – 1962) was a New Thought leader and teacher, as well as a prolific author of metaphysical and New Thought books.  He is credited by Horatio Dresser as being a founder in the New Thought movement.  Many of Larson’s books remain in print today, nearly 100 years after they were first published, and his writings influenced notable New Thought authors and leaders, including Religious Science founder, Ernest Holmes.

Larson, of Norwegian origin, was born in Iowa and attended Iowa State College and a Unitarian theological school in Meadville, PA.  While little is known about his personal life and what led to his studies in mental science, what is known is its logical teachings appealed to Larson’s analytical mind and led him to discover that combining theology and science could provide a practical and systematic philosophy of life.  During his time he was honorary president of the International New Thought Alliance and lectured extensively during the 1920s and 1930s.  He was a colleague of such notables as William Walker Atkinson, Charles Brodie Patterson, and Home of Truth founder Annie Rix Militz.  He developed the Optimist Creed in use today by Optimist International, better known as the Optimist Clubs.

He married wife Georgea L DuBois on February 14, 1918. They had two children, Louise DuBois Larson (born 1920) and Christian D. Larson Jr. (born 1924). The family lived in Beverly Hills for many years.

BioSource: Wikipedia and Christian D. Larson Home Page


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