Tag Archives: Values

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do Good, Feel Good

 

Do Good, Feel Good. What Kind of Ethics is That?

 

“When I do good, I feel good; when I do bad, I feel bad, and that is my religion.”

– Abraham Lincoln

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It’s straight from our esteemed President Lincoln, who is referring to that still small voice that tells us right and wrong. Everyone has it within…and we hear that gentle voice urging us one way or not.  So President Lincoln is not calling for a marvelous free for all where anyone follows their whim.  He’s calling us to listen to an internal guide of Truth.

It’s about truly doing good, authentic, down home, core, natural goodness.   This is something which is in all of us.  And it’s available to us all.   Do Good, feel that confirmation in your heart that it is the right thing. Then you feel good, and you know it is right. And then I’d add, keep on doing whatever is good!

 

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Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America.  He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose.  The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him towards the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You’ll See Spirit Operating Everywhere” —Dan Millman

 

“Like the flower, trusting Spirit working according to a higher will beyond the reach of your mind, you’ll see Spirit operating everywhere, in everyone and everything…

 

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…To trust the process of your life. The more you trust Spirit in this way, the more you will work with it directly as a living force in your life… unfolding, like a flower, toward the Light.” 

—Dan Millman

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Dan Millman is an American writer and speaker. He was born and raised in Los Angeles, California, where he had an extremely active childhood. He took part in modern dance, trampoline, and gymnastics. Millman attended University of California, Berkeley, where he would receive study psychology. He won the 1964 Trampoline World Championships in London, earned All-American honors and won an NCAA Championship in vaulting, and in 1966 he won the USGF championship in floor exercise. He won four Gold Medals in gymnastics at the 1966 Maccabiah Games. He would go on to coach gymnastics at Stanford University, before he began conducting motivational seminars and presenting keynote speeches. He’s married to Joy Millman and they have three adult children.

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Obtaining the Things We Crave Most– Give

 

“There is a wonderful mythical law that the three things we crave most in life – happiness, freedom, and peace of mind – are always attained by giving them to someone else.”

– Peyton March

 

Life is Sharing

 

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Peyton Conway March (December 27, 1864 -1955) was an American soldier and Army Chief of Staff.  He had enormous influence in preparing America for World War I, and was highly committed to upholding freedom. March was the son of Francis Andrew March, who was a founder of modern comparative linguistics in English.  He was among the first professors to advocate English be taught in universities. Peyton March fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War.  During the Russo-Japanese War, he traveled as an American military attaché with the Japanese army, and he also worked with General MacArthur.  March was promoted to brigadier general during World War I, and later to Army Chief of Staff.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make Each Day Your Masterpiece.” – John Wooden

 

“Make each day your masterpiece.”

— John Wooden

 

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Unmatched. That’s what Coach John Wooden is asking us to be.

 

To live a life unmatched each day — which is a masterpiece — means living according to your values.

 

When I usually think about a gargantuan goal, I think of something more along the lines of an Olympian. Yet it doesn’t always mean running (or winning) a marathon.

 

It is being your own masterpiece. That means today, you live with kindness in all the minute interactions you might have. It’s not just about doing your best, yet also treating others your best.  You, your being and presence, are the kind masterpiece that positively affects the world.

 

From living your masterpiece as an individual, and on this basis of values — only then can you paint another masterpiece. Pick a passion… be it gardening, being an excellent bookkeeper, being elected to office, writing a short story, exploring the best hikes and appreciating nature… And step by step, create excellence. Get inducted into your own hall of fame.

 

But remember, the greatest hall of fame is… treating others your best.

 

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John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010) was an American basketball coach. He was a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (inducted in 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categories. His ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period while at UCLA are unmatched by any other college basketball coach.  He was married to Nellie Riley for 53 years, and they had two children.  After Nellie’s death, John had a monthly ritual until his own death 25 years later, of visiting her grave and writing her a love letter.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Spending Time with People You Love and Who Love You”

“It is only a slight exaggeration to say that happiness is the experience of spending time with people you love and who love you.”

 –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel Laureate

 

Gifts and giving.  We associate so much of that with happiness.  Yet our one true Happiness is Loving Others. 

 

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Oh, that sweet presence to just be around those we cherish and feel at home with!

Daniel Kahneman is an Israeli-American psychologist and Nobel laureate.  He is known for his work in the psychology of decision-making.  He was born in Tel Aviv, spent his childhood in France, and moved to Israel in the late 1940s.  He studied psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and began his career as a lecturer there.  Kahneman has published extensively in psychology, and received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 2002 for his work on prospect theory.  He is currently on the faculty at Princeton.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “A Selfless Person Is More Concerned About the Happiness of Another…”

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“A selfless person is one who is more concerned about the happiness and well-being of another than about his or her own convenience or comfort, one who is willing to serve another when it is neither sought for nor appreciated, or one who is willing to serve even those whom he or she dislikes. A selfless person displays a willingness to sacrifice, a willingness to purge from his or her mind and heart personal wants, and needs, and feelings. Instead of reaching for and requiring praise and recognition for himself, or gratification of his or her own wants, the selfless person will meet these very human needs for others. ”

–H. Burke Peterson

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H. Burke Peterson was an authority in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, and the author of “A Glimpse of Glory”.  In World War II, he fought with the American Navy in the Pacific theatre.  After the war, he attended the University of Arizona and went on to receive his masters at the Utah State Agricultural College. He was married to Brookie Carden in 1947, and they had five daughters.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make Criticism Yield to You

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“Against criticism a man can neither protest nor defend himself;

he must act in spite of it, and then it will gradually yield to him.”

–Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

No matter how hard it is, we have to face challenging feedback and take some step of action. It’s not easy… but the more we do it, the more we become accustomed to it. To being honest with ourselves… and to overcoming the challenge. We grow, we excel, and we move on, up and over it.   With that honesty, as Goethe states, the criticism “will gradually yield to him.”

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Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832) was a German poet, playwright, novelist, and natural philosopher, best known for his two-part poetic drama Faust, which he started around the age of twenty-three and didn’t finish till shortly before his death sixty years later. He is considered one of the greatest contributors of the German Romantic period. At the age of sixteen, in 1765, Goethe went to Leipzig University to study law as his father wished, though he also gained much recognition from the Rococo poems and lyric he wrote during this period. In 1766, he fell in love with Anne Catharina Schoenkopf (1746-1810) and wrote his joyfully exuberant collection of poems Annette.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe now rests in the Fürstengruft or “Royal Tomb” in the “Historic Cemetery” in Wiemar where his dear friend Schiller is also laid to rest. In honour of these two famous German men of letters, a statue of Goethe and Schiller now stands at the German National Theatre in Munich. UNESCO’S “Memory of the World” list includes the handwritten works of Goethe preserved by the Goethe-Schiller-Archive.

Bio Source: The Literature Network