Tag Archives: understanding

The Classic Pamela Positive: Build Your Global Business by Listening

 

So you are building a business. That’s wonderful!

One of the most important things we can do when we build, is to Listen. Listening helps us understand what our clients need. It tells us what we can produce that is of value. And it shows that we care.

This is even more important when we are working with people all over the world. When getting involved internationally, it’s even more important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community. To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world. You will then build the best product, and build the best team, for the world. 

 

People Having Meeting

 

In addition, Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And, you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

Of course, this opens your business up to new opportunities.

So it’s not just another day at work today. Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about doing so each moment. Then, it’s not work, but meaningful communication, a meaningful product, a meaningful team, a meaningful life, moment by moment.  Listen to attain your business bliss!

 

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Listening Is Living,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels

Fig².  Photo by mentatdgt on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Thoughts on Kindness and Battle

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle.”

 

 

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This quote is often attributed to Philo of Alexandria. Philo was a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher who lived from 20 BC to 50 AD. This quote is also sometimes cited to Plato, a classical Greek philosopher who was the student of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle.

 

I received this great quote from a wonderful academic leader at USC, Warren Bennis. I was sharing my mission and values with Dr. Bennis, and he provided this quote as helpful guidance.

 

I met Dr. Bennis when I was inducted into his leadership institute while getting my masters in communications. His demeanor is warm, kind, astute and constantly open to new trends and progress in our society. Dr. Bennis, thank you for this meaningful quote!

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Is America’s Banyan Tree the Conference Room?

 

This is Part Two of a Two-Part series on the Bayan tree. You can read Part One here.

 

 

It is interesting how in America and in many places across the world, most of our meetings take place in walled, sterile conference rooms. Chairs are uniformly around the table. The walls are usually plastered with notices about the companys achievements. Pens and pads are available so we can write and record and get our business done.”Gosh darn it,” I can hear the executives say, “in this room we’re going to get to the solution, get down to business, and ‘make it happen.’

 

 

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Yet what if we looked at doing all of our business, or even holding all of our meetings, under a banyan tree? This return to nature might help conversations flow more easily.

 

 

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Perhaps this atmosphere would allow us to be more authentic. If we are surrounded by nature’s occasional stirring winds, visionary clouds floating across the sky, and brilliant beckoning sun, would we not also settle into a more authentic course of conversation?Could it lead to more natural, comfortable (and no less impactful, but rather more so) solutions? Within this reframing context of nature, we can discuss our goals and hopes and plans and perhaps achieve even greater goals.

 

 

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Here’s a thought… We can replace the pen, paper and busy scribbling of notes, with more eye contact. We supplant the flurried white board scrawls with more thoughtful listening. What a profound impact this has to have on any business relationship, business decision, and especially, with any personal matter. 

Until we can “Unconference Room” your meeting space, perhaps we can imagine all of our conversations thoughtfully taking place under a Banyan tree. A place where comfort, understanding, and right relationships result under its strong, rooted and peaceful presence.

 

 


 

 

The banyan tree originally received its name from the merchants who gathered beneath it to do business; in the Gujarati language, banyameans merchant/grocer.” Western visitors to India observed the merchants meeting beneath the tree, and the name evolved to refer to the tree itself. The banyan trees are given great symbolism in both Hinduism and Buddhism. Banyan trees can grow to cover hundreds of feet, and live for over a thousand years.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Do It Anyway

 

Do It Anyway

People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered.
Forgive them anyway.

If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.

If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies.
Succeed anyway.

If you are honest and sincere, people may deceive you.
Be honest and sincere anyway.

 

 

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What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight.
Create anyway.

If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous.
Be happy anyway.

The good you do today, will often be forgotten.
Do good anyway.

Give the best you have, and it will never be enough.
Give your best anyway.

In the final analysis, it is between you and God.  It was never between you and them anyway.

 


 

This poem is widely attributed to Mother Teresa, after it was found hanging on a wall in her home for children in Calcutta.  It is a revised version of “The Paradoxical Commandments,” written by Dr. Kent M. Keith.  You can read more about the story on our UniversalGiving blog, PhilanthroPost.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Listening – A Business Bliss

 

When getting involved internationally, it’s so important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community.  To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world.

 

 

colleagues-437024_640

 

 

Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. It will also open your business up to new opportunities. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you. And you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect, which is a type of “business bliss.”

So it’s not just another day at work today.   Look forward to positive work because you are a good leader, a good listener, and care about doing so each moment.  Then, it’s not work, but meaningful life, moment by moment.

 

 

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Listening is Living,

Pamela

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Importance of “Yes And”

 

When on the improv stage, one of the most important principles is listening to and supporting your partner.  If you do this, you help create a very strong sense of team, and also further the story in a way that is interesting to the audience.

 

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For example, if someone says, “Let’s go to the store,” you can “Yes and” it by saying, “wonderful, I love JZ’s store, because it has such great record memorabilia that dates back to the fifties!” What you have done is “yes and-ed” your partner.  You have essentially built on the first concept they introduced, a store.

 

Contrary to good improv, one could have done a “yes but.” For example, “Okay, that store is fine, but I really want to go to the movies.” That is denying your partner on stage, and invalidating their idea. You are not building on their initial idea, nor are you moving the story forward. You’ve essentially blocked them.  our story has now halted, and your partner does not necessarily feel supported.  This is the importance of “yes and-ing” rather than “yes but-ing.”

 

 

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Whether you’re an investor, an improviser on the stage, leading a team at a company, or a soccer captain, we can all practice the glory of “yes and-ing” one another.  If we do so, we will build a beautiful and strong world based on a foundation of supporting wins for everyone, all around.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Listening – A Business Bliss

 

When getting involved internationally, it’s so important to listen to others. Respect the person, the culture, and their local community.  To do so is to honor the unique wisdom and presence they bring to the world.

 

 

colleagues-437024_640

 

Listening, and striving to understand other people, is the right thing to do. It will also open your business up to new opportunities. When you honor people and their local customs, they will want to work with you.  And you will love working with them!  Listening is mirrored in Respect,  which is a type of “business bliss.”