Tag Archives: transformation

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

 

anthony-delanoix-15928-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

 

fotografia-ges-636998-unsplash (1)

 

 

Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

 

Singing,

Pamela


The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

Bio source: Wikipedia

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

 

anthony-delanoix-15928-unsplash (1).jpg

 

 

We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

 

fotografia-ges-636998-unsplash (1)

 

 

Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

Singing,

Pamela

 

 


 

 

sai baba (1)

The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

 

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “You Must Pass Your Days In Song. Let Your Whole Life Be A Song.” – Sai Baba

 

 

“You must pass your days in song. Let your whole life be a song.”

– Sai Baba

 

Having a low day? Feeling a little drum. Then, pick up a song, fast or sweet, kind or slow. Let it move your heart with goodness to flow throughout the day.

 

Don’t be held back by that tiny annoyance… or that insecurity. Or the office gossip, or your feeling lonely. Your life is a song! So start singing, even if quietly to yourself. Your heart will lift.

 

anthony-delanoix-15928-unsplash (1).jpg

 

We should learn. Sai Baba was a meditative doer of good in the late 19th century. His home was home at the edge of the Babul forest in Central India. There, he meditated and soul searched, more and more, while he was winding his way through the forest. He settled upon an abandoned mosque which became a sort of home. He opened his home and accepted all. He meditated, advised, and cherished all people. Hindi, Muslim and people who didn’t even know what they believed became welcomed visitors. His whole goal was the transformation of people into realizing their spiritual selves. He held dances, meditations, and talks. He helped people as he wanted them to be free, just as he found freedom. He was free from materialism, because his life was a song.

 

fotografia-ges-636998-unsplash (1)

 

Let your life be a song. Don’t get weighed down by a sneer, a petty person or small inconvenience. Do a dance, do a song. You can even perform it quietly in your heart.

 

Let your life be a song, and you will be free.

 

Singing,

Pamela

******

 

sai baba (1)

 

The early life of Sai Baba is still cloaked in mystery. It is believed that Baba was born somewhere between 1838 and 1842 CE in a place called Pathri in Marathwada in Central India. Some believers use September 28, 1835 as an official birth date. When he was about 16 years of age, Sai Baba arrived at Shirdi. At Shirdi, Baba stayed on the outskirts of the village in Babul forest and used to mediate under a neem tree for long hours. Some villagers considered him mad, but others revered the saintly figure and gave him food for sustenance.

 

After wandering in the thorny woods for a long time, Baba moved to a dilapidated mosque, which he referred to as “Dwarkarmai” (named after the abode of Krishna, Dwarka). This mosque became the abode of Sai Baba till his last day. Here, he received pilgrims of both Hindu and Islamic persuasion. The abode of Sai Baba, Dwarkamai, was open to all, irrespective of religion, caste and creed. Sai Baba was at ease with both Hindu scriptures and Muslim texts. He used to sing the songs of Kabir and dance with ‘fakirs’. Baba was the lord of the common man and through his simple life, he worked for the spiritual metamorphosis and liberation of all human beings. Sai Baba is said to have attained ‘mahasamadhi’—the conscious departure from his living body—on October 15, 1918. Before his death, he said, “Do not think I am dead and gone. You will hear me from my Samadhi and I shall guide you.”

 

 

Citations:
Fig. 1: Photo by Anthony Delanoix on Unsplash
Fig. 2: Photo by Fotografia.ges on Unsplash

How Villagers in the Developing World Became Untrapped! Free Someone Today.

“In poor countries these days….billions of people who would be trapped in their villages enjoy the freedom that the bicycle confers to pedal around the town or countryside – to buy, sell, learn and love.” – Emma Duncan

Imagine

No transportation, except you carrying you.

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But something that weighs 23 pounds with a speed of 31 MPH can change your life like that!

And it’s simply as this.

cycling_kids

All of a sudden your life is transformed.  You can travel and see a far away friend…

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You can build a business to support your family

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You can learn and grow

bikekidschool

Love,
Pamela

Bikes change people’s lives.  Help someone Give Freedom Today!  Start today by giving!

—✶—

Emma Duncan is the Deputy Editor of “The Economist”. She has held several other posts on the paper previously, including Britain Editor, Asia Editor and chief reporter, writer and editor on climate change. She has covered the media business, the Middle East, home affairs, agriculture, commodities and the transport industry and has served as Delhi correspondent, covering India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. She has written special reports for the paper on Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states, India, Pakistan and the food industry.

Ms Duncan appears regularly on television and radio programs. She has written widely on a freelance basis, for publications such as the “Times”, “The Sunday Times”, “The Daily Telegraph”, “Vogue”, and “Cosmopolitan”.

In 1988-89, she wrote “Breaking the Curfew” (Michael Joseph), a book on politics, culture and society in the troubled state of Pakistan. She has an honours degree in politics, philosophy and economics from Oxford University and started her career as a researcher and reporter at Independent Television News. Ms Duncan has three children and lives in London and Suffolk.

Source

The Pamela Positive: “The Magic of Two People’s Connection with Each Other Can Be Life Transformative”

“…the magic of two people’s connection with each other can be life transformative, just as the lack of connection can be life depleting.”
– Marilyce Pace, business woman, writer and cat aficionado

How true it is… that how we support, connect with,  love others can fulfill us and others with such joy.  What an impact we can have each day with a sincere connection!   Thank you, Marilyce.