Tag Archives: thought

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India ‘Namaste’ Means: I Honor The Place In You Of Love, Of Light, Of Truth, Of Peace.” -Ram Dass

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

-Ram Dass

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

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Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe, and love. The people in our lives are amazing. Be amazed.

Ram Dass teaches us to honor the divine in everyone, regardless of their background, religion, ethnicity, or thoughts. He’s practiced this at Harvard, India and all over, striving to bring peace to the world, person by person.

 

sailboat on body of water during daytime

 

So, who do you see the divine in today? Who amazes you today?

For me, it is my Mom. She is a great person, a great mom, a sincere friend a shining light of care for others. She is that peacegiver of divine love, loving others, all the time. Find someone who is your peacegiver and recognize them today. Thank you, dear Mom!

 


Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions. He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path. His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet. He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

Bio Sources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org  Fig¹. Photo by Nathan Cowley on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Kevin Noble on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution To Any Relationship Problem

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

― Abraham Lincoln

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

woman walking along pathway during daytime

 

Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves being right.

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end. Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

It wins no battles. Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets

 

We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led. Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful. It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

Two Women Sitting on Ground Near Bonfire

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family. It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 


Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He is regarded as one of America’s greatest heroes due to his role as savior of the Union and emancipator of slaves. His rise from humble beginnings to achieving the highest office in the land is a remarkable story. His eloquent support of democracy and insistence that the Union was worth saving embody the ideals of self-government that all nations strive to achieve. Lincoln’s distinctively humane personality and incredible impact on the nation have endowed him with an enduring legacy. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. Lincoln married Mary Todd on November 4, 1842, at her sister Elizabeth’s home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 23 years old and he was 33 years of age. They had four sons, all born in Springfield.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY  Fig¹.  Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Alexander Ramsey on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Vera Arsic on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sit Down At The Table

 

“…they’ve done studies on children who are required to sit down at the family table and those who are not.  And the ones who are score higher academically; they’re more well adjusted.”

― Paula Deen

 

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Sit down, be present, share. It’s not just about community, about family… but also about being the best we can be. Sitting down at the table with your loved ones for a mealtime shares love, and, helps you reach your goals!

Paula Deen did just that… she made ‘sitting down’ at the table with loved ones a life calling.  She does that fulltime, preparing lovely meals, and allowing us to enjoy and make them as well.

 

Sharing Cherry Tomatoes

 

So take some time to sit with your family, friends, or loved ones.. be supported…be nourished.. and be your best self. Thank you to Paula Deen who lives it daily.

Sitting With My Family,

Pamela


Paula Deen was born Paula Hiers in Albany, Georgia, the daughter of Corrie A. (née Paul) and Earl Wayne Hiers, Sr. Her parents died before she was 23, and an early marriage ended in divorce. In her 20s, Deen suffered from panic attacks and agoraphobia. She then focused on cooking for her family as something she could do without leaving her house.

Her grandmother Irene Paul had taught her the hand-me-down art of Southern cooking; one of the only places she felt safe was at her own stove, making thousands of pots of chicken and dumplings.  She later moved to Savannah, Georgia, with her sons.  Paula had many different jobs and roles, learning what she loved to do.  She tried hanging wallpaper, working as a bank teller, selling real estate and insurance. She then started a catering service,  making sandwiches and meals, which her sons Jamie and Bobby delivered. She then found her calling.

BioSource: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Pablo Merchán Montes on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by fauxels on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Praise and Joy Should Be a Permanent Part of Our Soul

 

A person is fully human

“when joy is the fundamental thing in him, and grief the superficial. Melancholy should be an innocent interlude, a tender and fugitive frame of mind; praise should be the permanent pulsation of the soul.  Pessimism is at best an emotional half-holiday; joy is the uproarious labor by which all things live.”

―G. K. Chesterton

 

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G.K. Chesteron certainly let us know what we need to focus on: joy. And what a life force it is! We don’t realize how much our thoughts impact us, our minds, our actions, our responses.  And therefore how it affects others’ minds, actions, and responses. He also points to the vapidness of negative thinking. What can it do, how can it build? It only tears down. And so we should, as best as possible, obliterate it from thought.

 

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We can contribute so much in this world. It starts with our thoughts; it starts right now; and that joy can carry us to an entirely different level of harmonious living.

Thank you to Gilbert Keith Chesterton for such wonderful advice.


G.K. Chesterton was a profound English writer of the 20th century who contributed across philosophy and poetry, as well as fiction. Two of his best-known works are Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man. He also wrote a weekly column in The London Illustrated News for thirty years. He was known for his incredible intellect, desire to decrease political divisions, and strong reasoning skills.

Bio Source: The Society of Gilbert Keith Chesterton  Fig¹. Photo by Rob Laughter on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Kacper Szczechla on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: How Can You Use and Reuse Paper?

 

We can live consciously and thoughtfully about how we use paper.

When you write a note, could you also reuse it again, and use the other side? When you receive a card, is there a portion of it that’s not written on, that could be used for a casual note to a roommate, spouse or friend?

 

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Or perhaps you could even use it for a to-do list. When you receive a box of a recent book or item of clothing, you can save it for holiday gifts. Let’s think creatively about our trees…