Tag Archives: thinking

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India ‘Namaste’ means: I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace”

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

—Ram Dass

 

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

 

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

 

woman sitting on rock near green tree under white clouds and blue sky

 

 

Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

 

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing.  Be amazed.

 

Ram Dass teaches us to honor the divine in everyone, regardless of their background, religion, ethnicity, or thoughts.  He’s practiced this at Harvard, India and all over, striving to bring peace to the world, person by person.

 

 

sailboat on body of water during daytime

 

 

So, who do you see the divine in today? Who amazes you today?

 

For me, it is my Mom.   She is a great person, a great mom, a sincere friend a shining light of care for others.  She is that peacegiver of divine Love, loving others, all the time.

 

 


 

Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions.  He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path.  His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet.  He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

BioSources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Brooke Cagle on Unsplash
Fig². Kevin Noble on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India, when we meet and greet and we say ‘Namaste’, which means: I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace”

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

 

-Ram Dass

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

 

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

 

brooke-cagle-320838-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

 

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing.  Be amazed.

 

 

dave-contreras-119713-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Who amazes you today?

 

For me, it is my Mom, and my sister. Both great people, great moms, and shining lights of caring for others.

 


 

 

  • Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.
  • During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions.  He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path.  His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet.  He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

 

Sources: Wikipedia: Ram Dass and Bio from RamDass.org

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Should Our Work Make Us Happy?

 

I find that so much of what is true ‘happiness’ in one’s job is how we conduct ourselves and our thinking.

 

For example, even if your job isn’t your exact ideal, there are elements that can bring full happiness. Being of service is not relegated to any one sector. Being professional, kind, courteous, and with a high “client service” attitude to external parties as well as to the internal team, can bring high “happiness” value.

 

 

 

 

 

Ideally, it should be coupled with sincere appreciation in return.  Regardless, it makes us feel happy to deliver sincere value. We hold a “high happiness quotient” in our own esteem for ourselves and how we are serving.

 

 

work2

 

On the larger scale of trying to find something you love to do—I do think each person has a wonderful contribution in life and is here for a reason. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to search for it. Part of the searching makes us who we are; hones our goals; and positively affects others along the way… Life is not just an end game of finding the one job which makes you happy. You are evolving, and your happiness, and therefore growth, is also evolving.

 

The Pamela Positive: “The Rain Had Painted Beauty in the Garden”

Today I’d like to honor what Stephanie Morimoto wrote in a beautiful post about nature and overcoming life difficulties.  

My favorite line of her beautiful writing was “the rain had painted beauty in the garden.”  Any seeming difficulties are signs. Signs of how we need to turn a bit more attention to some part of our life… or sometimes, let go and gently turn away from some other aspect of our life…to listen and know which people we should serve more closely…and which ones we should gently love from afar.

While I adore the “sunniness of the sun,” rain is welcome to me. I grew up with the drought here so I am so grateful for it.  It feels a bit refreshing…and as she discovered, beauty burgeons and beckons in different ways.  But of course, after awhile, I certainly welcome the sun back!

Thank you for a moving post, Stephanie, tying in food, our land, nature — into positive life lessons.

Here’s an excerpt from Stephanie’s post:

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“Our limited perspective, our hopes and fears, become our measure of life, and when circumstances don’t fit our ideas they become our difficulties.”–Benjamin Franklin

I experienced how to take what Benjamin Franklin said and flip it on its head…I was able to transform those difficulties into inspirations…

So I thought, why not apply this concept to other areas of my life? For instance, the rainy, chilly weather we’ve been having lately has been bumming me out. Every morning I’d get up, make my cup of tea, and be itching to go outside and garden, but the drizzle would dissuade me.

The other day, though, when there was a lull in the downpour, I decided to get over it. I thought the soil may have dried out just enough for me to get the garlic and favas in the ground, so I grabbed my trowel and tromped outside.

I was able to plant the garlic and favas. But the thing that was even more exciting was seeing that the rain had painted beauty in the garden. Fat water droplets hung on the bronze fennel, decorating it into something reminiscent of a Christmas tree (highly appropriate for this time of year).

…Experiencing this day in the garden brought what I believe Franklin’s point was home for me. We each have the power to transform circumstances that can seem difficult, irritating, depressing (or whatever) into something easier, fun, or inspiring. We just have to change our perspectives: turn upside down, push ourselves outside, and see the world just a little bit differently.