Tag Archives: sustainability

The New Luxury – Water

In many emerging nations, children are starving and dying due to lack of clean water.  As a “developed” nation, it certainly doesn’t seem that advanced for us to be getting water for free.   Meanwhile, two million people in the developing world are dying every year because they can’t access clean water.

Maybe we won’t have water fountains in the future.

It doesn’t make sense.   If there is a limited, precious resource, why should it flow freely to those who have the most access to it? And at the same time, be so costly to others who need it most?

I think we should have to buy our water, bottled or fountain.  It’s a cherished, expensive and rare commodity. Quite soon, and even by certain nations, water already is the new diamond.

The diamonds which are jewels are high end commodities, which are optional.  Yet water is not a “high-end commodity” that we can go without.

Our society is now realizing that the most prized and honored possessions in our world are things that we actually cannot possess…  Water is used, captured again, recycled in nature, and used again.  Unlike diamonds, it can’t fit in our jewelry box, where we take it out whenever we so desire.  Its beauty rests in its necessary part of our day to day.

Its beauty rests in the continuation of life.

*************

Let’s do all we can today to conserve water or donate to make water available for someone else.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make of Your Life an Affirmation”

4678571644_e92e303f6f_o

“Make of your life an affirmation, defined by your ideals, not the negation of others. Dare to the level of your capability then go beyond to a higher level.” –Alexander Haig

—✶—

Alexander Haig was a four-star general in the United States Army, as well as Chief of Staff under President Nixon and President Ford, and Secretary of State under President ReaganA veteran of Korea and Vietnam, Haig received the Distinguished Service Cross, the Silver Star with oak leaf cluster, and the Purple Heart.

 

Pamela’s Weekly Words of Wisdom: “Shame on You, Aunt Pamela, That’s a TREE”

birch-588926_640A few years ago, my niece Lindsey gave me a great talking to. She was 5 or 6, and needed help in the restroom, so off we went. As we finished up, I pulled two paper towels to dry my hands.

“Shame on you, Aunt Pamela. That’s a tree! We can’t hurt the trees!”

I asked her where she learned that important lesson.

“In school. They teach us paper comes from trees, and we need to keep our trees.” Continue reading

What We Can Learn from Japan’s Environmental Sustainability

cairn-437303_1280

Where do you think the concept of environmental sustainability came from? Sometimes we think America is the “entrepreneur of all answers.” We innovate here, and I love that quality about our country. And while I’m proud of California’s increased consciousness about the importance of preserving our Earth, we usually have to look back to see where the truth started. Continue reading

“The Spirit of Kansas City”: Where the Greeting Card Industry Got Started

unnamed-4

It was my joy to be visiting a friend and for a business trip in Kansas City and there… I stumbled upon the story of the founder of Hallmark cards. Joyce Clyde Hall grew up in Nebraska, his two older brothers opened up a post card store, which were then very much in vogue. He worked for them for awhile and then thought perhaps he would move and open up distribution and send bulk postcards to retailers. A friend, who later became a top salesman for him, deterred him from going to Omaha and said, “You should go to Kansas City! There you will find such spirit and receptivity!”

Continue reading

Start Up or Continue Mode?

rsz_pyramid copyIf you’re in Silicon Valley, the big word on the street is “Start Up Mode.” It’s cool, it’s hip and it’s new. If you’re in Start Up Mode that indicates you’re doing something innovative —  and people’s ears will perk up.

But I’d like to talk today about one of the most important Modes. And some see it as less attractive.  It’s what I call “Continue Mode.”  Continue reading

The Classic Pamela Positive: The Right Timing In Your Life: What We Can Learn from Japan’s Edo Era

tomato-178900_640During the Edo era in Japan (1603-1868), the only wood they’d use from the forest was if a branch had fallen from a tree.  In the same way, we don’t pick fruit before it’s ripe.

We don’t wrench the immature tomato from the vine.  When it is the right time, you’ll find it almost drops off naturally in your hand. Continue reading