Tag Archives: success

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Don’t Bunt. Aim Out Of The Ballpark.” – David Ogilvy

 

“Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ballpark. Aim for the company of the immortals.”

―David Ogilvy

 

10967154495_4b4cefe539_o.jpg

 

This is a beautiful clear message, especially in honor of our quirky, beloved Giants, about a clear focus. A focus that aims for the best, drives for excellence, and holds the highest standards in mind. Mr. Ogilvy did that with his advertising firm, and so we can choose to aim out of the ballpark in our chosen endeavor, too.

 


David Mackenzie Ogilvy (23 June 1911 21 July 1999) was an advertising executive, widely hailed as “The Father of Advertising,and the author of the book Ogilvy on Advertising, a general commentary on advertising. He was born in West Horsley, Surrey in England and his parents were Dorothy Blow Fairfield and Francis John Longley Ogilvy, the latter a classics scholar and a financial broker. David attended St Cyprian’s School, Eastbourne; Fettes College in Edinburgh; and Christ Church, Oxford.  While working as an AGA salesman he wrote The Theory and Practice of Selling the AGA Cooker, considered by Fortune magazine as the finest sales instruction manual written. The manual led to his next job as account executive at London advertising agency Mather & Crowther, run by his older brother Francis. After WWII and having worked as a chef, researcher, and farmer Ogilvy started his own advertising agency in New York called Ogilvy, Benson, and Mather, where David was its Chairman until he retired in 1973. In the 1980s he returned as Chairman of the companys India office, then as temporary Chairman of the agencys German office, and visited and represented the companys branches around the world.

Ogilvy married three times, the first two marriages ending in divorce: first to Melinda Street, where they had one child, David Fairfield Ogilvy; then to Anne Cabot; and later on, Herta Lans until his passing in 1999 at his home in Bonnes, France.  In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of British Empire (CBE), adding to his many honors and achievements. In his lifetime and onwards he established his advertising philosophys four basic principles: creative brilliance, research, actual results for clients, and professional discipline.  

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by ogilvywashington on flickr

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Faith Is A Living, Daring Confidence

 

“Faith is a living, daring confidence in God’s grace, so sure and certain that a man could stake his life on it a thousand times”

-Martin Luther

 

Faith is a living, daring confidence. Wow! What language from Martin Luther. And his life certainly had to thrive off of daring. It’s not often we think of someone having to take a stand, and in this case, he took a stand to create a new branch of Christianity, Lutheranism.

When the Roman Catholic church solicited more funds for building St. Peter’s Basilica, Luther wrote 95 Theses to protest and foment discussion. He felt it was using money to excess, and disagreed that the pope was the only liaison to God. And due to the recent printing press, it spread all over Europe in two months, a communications miracle!

 

3404754045_461de199bd_o.jpg

 

He meant it for discussion, but he was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic church, and ostracized by thousands. But he kept going.

 

Person Walking on Metal Stairs

 

Still, Martin Luther’s life had challenges. He felt distanced from God, separated from inspiration. He was always searching for the Truth, and it was a struggle. He became a monk, a theologist, leader of a church, and always, a sincere seeker of Truth.

 

Beige and White Church Interior

 

So what is the point for us? Well, it’s not really about being Roman Catholic or Protestant. But it is about claiming rights for yourself and others where you can. And, using technology to spread the word!

 

Person Using Laptop

 

What do you need to take a stand for today?

With Gratitude For The Truth,

Pamela

 


Born in Germany in 1483, Martin Luther became one of the most influential figures in Christian history when he began the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century. He called into question some of the basic tenets of Roman Catholicism, and his followers soon split from the Roman Catholic Church to begin the Protestant tradition.

Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, in Eisleben, Saxony, in modern southeast Germany.  In 1501, Martin Luther entered the University of Erfurt, where he received a Master of Arts degree (in grammar, logic, rhetoric and metaphysics). However, in July 1505, Luther had a life-changing experience that set him on a new course. Caught in a horrific thunderstorm where he feared for his life, Luther cried out to St. Anne, the patron saint of miners, “Save me, St. Anne, and I’ll become a monk!” The storm subsided and he was saved.

The first few years of monastery life were difficult for Martin Luther, as he did not find the religious enlightenment he was seeking. Upon his return to Germany, he enrolled in the University of Wittenberg in an attempt to suppress his spiritual turmoil. He excelled in his studies and received a doctorate, becoming a professor of theology at the university. Through his studies of scripture, Martin Luther finally gained religious enlightenment.

In 1517, Pope Leo X announced a new round of indulgences to help build St. Peter’s Basilica. On October 31, 1517, an angry Martin Luther nailed a sheet of paper with 95 theses on the university’s chapel door. Though he intended these to be discussion points, the Ninety-Five Theses laid out a devastating critique of the indulgences as corrupting people’s faith. Luther also sent a copy to Archbishop Albert Albrecht of Mainz, calling on him to end the sale of indulgences. Aided by the printing press, copies of the Ninety-Five Theses spread throughout Germany within two weeks and throughout Europe within two months.

Luther publicly declared that the Bible did not give the pope the exclusive right to interpret scripture. In January 1521, Martin Luther was officially excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church. Miraculously, he was able to avoid capture and began organizing a new church, Lutheranism. He gained many followers and got support from German princes. In 1525, he married Katharina von Bora, a former nun who had abandoned the convent and taken refuge in Wittenberg. Together, over the next several years, they had six children.

Martin Luther is one of the most influential and controversial figures in the Reformation movement. His actions fractured the Roman Catholic Church into new sects of Christianity and set in motion reform within the Church. A prominent theologian, his desire for people to feel closer to God led him to translate the Bible into the language of the people, radically changing the relationship between church leaders and their followers.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, Encyclopaedia Britannica.  Fig¹.  Photo by Zo on flickr  Fig².  Photo by Leon Macapagal on Pexels  Fig³. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels Fig⁴. Photo by Pixabay on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.

When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…

After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

- Warren Bennis

 

pexels-photo-684385.jpeg

 

I was honored to work in Leadership under Warren Bennis, a wonderful Business Leader. Ever calm and so very experienced, he taught us to look at life from an evaluative outlook.

What can I learn from this today?

How can I become better?

How will my life be better once I implement what I have learned?

 

Photo of Man Holding a Book

 

Take each step of life with great step of gratitude, goodness, and desire to grow. And upwards you go! With grace and peace. Thank you, dear Warren Bennis.

 


Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1955. His focus was on Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business. He has been married twice and has 4 children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig².  Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: “We Were Born To Succeed, Not To Fail.” – Henry David Thoreau

 

“We were born to succeed, not to fail.”

– Henry David Thoreau

 

photo-1519834785169-98be25ec3f84.jpeg

 

That is our life purpose. To follow our calling in our own specially designed way. And so we will succeed, because the measurement is solely on how you uniquely pursue your talents, goals, and qualities. Everyone has a different picture of success, his or her own beautiful expression.

I Love Your Expression,

Pamela


Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an author, philosopher, poet, abolitionist, and naturalist. He grew up in Massachusetts, into the “modest New England family” of John Thoreau, a pencil maker, and Cynthia Dunbar. He had two older siblings, Helen and John Jr., and a younger sister, Sophia. Thoreau’s birthplace still exists on Virginia Road in Concord. He studied at Harvard College between 1833 and 1837.

After college, he opened a grammar school with his brother in Concord, Massachusetts. During this time, he met Ralph Waldo Emerson who introduced him to other writers and encouraged him to publish his thoughts. He is the author of Walden, which is a philosophical argument for simple living and preservation of natural environment.  He also had other important writings on natural history, environmentalism and civil disobedience.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Ian Stauffer on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “…It Is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

 

“…It is to One’s Glory to Overlook an Offense.”

―Proverbs 19:11

Live in that Glory. Its an honor, a reverence for oneself and for others, to look up and over the offense. Lets not stare at it, contemplate it, look down at it in dismay. Can you look forward rather than rehearse the past?

 

photo-1543357480-c60d40007a3f

 

It is a tough call, especially if we are hurt. But its a good principle at work and home. A beautiful standard to which we can aspire in life.

Lets move forward to whats next: There is another act opening soon. Look forward to it!

 


Proverbs 19:11 is part of the Proverbs of Solomon, found in Proverbs 10-22:16. The specific section consists of two parts: the first contrasts the wise man and the fool (or the righteous and the wicked) and the second addresses wise and foolish speech. The Proverbs of Solomon and all other Proverbs raise questions of values, moral behavior, the meaning of life and right conduct.

Bio Source: Wikipedia: Proverbs  Fig¹.  Photo by Jason Hogan on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I Got My Start by Giving Myself a Start.” – Madam C.J. Walker

 

In the 1900s, Madam C.J. Walker made her mark for black women (and all women) by becoming the first African-American self-made millionaire in America.  She had a problem herself; in setting out to solve it, she helped others.

Madam Walker was losing some of her hair. So she created a hair product company that addressed this need, while helping women feel stronger, prouder, more beautiful. She was a millionaire within fifteen years.

 

Madam_CJ_Walker_face_circa_1914

 

Yet it wasn’t just enhancing women’s beauty and self-esteem that made her unique. She employed thousands of women; she shone with brilliance by being a great CEO. And she left us with some inspiring mottos by which she lived her life.

Two of my favorites are:

 

“I got my start by giving myself a start.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Photography of a Man And Woman Laughing

“I had to make my own living and my own opportunity. But I made it! Don’t sit down and wait for the opportunities to come. Get up and make them.”

―Madam C.J. Walker

 

Go “start” whatever you would love to do. It can be small, it can be on the side, it can be modest. But begin today. You will know yourself more, giving of your “only-you” talents.  You will also be providing opportunities and inspiration for others.

 


In honor of Black History month, we honor Madam C.J. Walker. She was the first self-made American millionaire who was African-American or female. Her own hair loss inspired her to experiment with home remedies, and then sell them throughout the country. She began by selling Madam Walker’s Wonderful Hair Grower, a healing conditioner for scalps. She traveled door-to-door throughout the South and Southeast to sell her products. Her corporation employed as many as 3,000 people at one point. Madam Walker also founded Lelia College to train “hair culturists,” assisting other black women to start their own businesses. She was a Civil Rights activist and philanthropist.

Madam Walker had a daughter, A’Lelia Walker. She became president of her mother’s company in 1919 and remained in that position until her death in August 1931.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹. Photo by Wikimedia Commons  Fig². Photo by Min An on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Make a Wish!

 

Make a Wish!

 

saad-chaudhry-775115-unsplash (1).jpg

 

It doesn’t matter if it’s your birthday. Make a wish, take a step towards your dreams. Then believe.

I’m Blowing a Good Wish for You Today,

Pamela


Fig¹. Photo by Saad Chaudry on Unsplash