Tag Archives: social media

Would You Say No To a Text? (Third in a Series of Three)

This is part 3 of a 3 part series that talks about finding and developing relationships you care about when social media can make it confusing to determine which are real. 
As you saw in my first part of this series, being present at lunch can make all the difference. (Read before about my lunch with Steve Mitchell from Ernst and Young, and the gift making each moment about people, relationships and being present. And in the second in our Series, we spoke of “Saying No to Social Media”.
So here’s where we are getting to the crux of what relationships mean in our day-to-day.   I am mentoring a few university students on their projects. Often times, the calls veer into day-to-day questions about values, and what is important in life. These conversations are very sincere, caring as students share their deepest thoughts.
I received this call the other evening from a very smart, engaged engineer who wants to make a difference in clean energy.
“I’m feeling really concerned. It feels off,” he said.
“What’s going on,” I respond.
“I was just realizing I am walking around campus and I know 100 people.  They know me. We say hi and we are friendly and it’s like I know all these people.”
“But I don’t,” he continued.  “At the end of the day, who of these people has my back…?”
 
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He was really worried.
It’s actually a good marker he was worried. For what he was driving at was that he desired substance.  That true connection, that life is about people, relationships and being present. And he didn’t necessarily feel that.  Who would have his back, or, be there for him?
 
Conversations like these show a natural backlash to our texting and social media norms.  They confront what being connected, feeling loved and feeling safe means.  So we have to work on having relationships in our lives that really make a difference. 
 
“Deepak,* you’re having the right thoughts. You’re valuing people and you’re seeking greater connections.  But the question I would ask is not “who has your back,” but “whose back do you have?  Who do you really care about, and of those 100 people, who do you really want a long-term, positive relationship of care and true sharing?”
 
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When we ask how we can care about someone else, we start taking practical steps to connect with them.  We will listen, help them grow and cheer them on.   Now you “have their back,” although I would say you’re seeking a way to connect mind and hearts. We’re not just trying to protect ourselves or others. We are seeking enriching, loving relationships.  
 
This led Deepak to start thinking about who he wanted a deeper relationship with. Maybe that was more lunches, study times, or shared activities with a few people.  It brought relief to his mind. He had a plan on how to care more deeply about others, and how they in turn would do the same.
 
In this digital world, we get caught up in texting, social media, and simply “waving to 100 people” who we might not really know.  For a true connection in life it’s about people, relationships and being present. How will you connect and care for someone today, offline? Please share!
*name was changed for confidential reasons
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Would You Say No To a Text? (Second of a series of three)

This is part 2 of a 3 part series that talks about the influence of social media on how present people are in their daily lives. 
As you saw in my first part of this series, being present at lunch can make all the difference. (Read before about my lunch with Steve Mitchell from Ernst and Young, and the gift making each moment about people, relationships and being present.)
But saying no to text isn’t the only area of which we need to be aware, and even say no to.
92% of American teenagers (ages 13-17) are online every day. In fact, almost a quarter say they are on some type of platform constantly. According to the 2015 report by Pew Research Center, there was one TV show where parents “tested” taking away their teens cellphones for 24 hours. In some cases, there were shrieks, cries and anguish of the teens begging for their phones back. They were overly connected to their phones.
Christine Rosen wrote in the Wall Street Journal:
“A typical teen, according to Pew, has 145 Facebook friends and 150 Instagram followers.  Based on survey data from our lab as well as national statistics, I would estimate that only between 5% and 15% of teens abstain from social-media use.”
But the social media tides maybe changing.  I know some people on my team who don’t do social media, or aren’t that involved. One of my great marketers was 26 and considered “YGen” — and was not on any social media. She simply told me she didn’t have time, and wasn’t interested.
Christine Rosen quotes a woman:
 “I feel like a lot of what happens on Instagram isn’t valuable communication,” said Katherine Silk, 18, who grew up in Los Angeles and is about to start a gap year before heading to Emory University. “I’ll be with friends eating, and they’ll say, ‘ Let’s post this on Instagram!’ Sometimes I feel like saying, ‘you should be talking to me and the other people here, not posting things for people who may or may not care, just so you can get more likes.”
As for the possibility that they are missing out, the social-media abstainers are sanguine. “If I have something important to tell my friends, I’ll call them. That’s enough,”  says Ms. Silk.”
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Just as it’s important to be present with your colleague at lunch, being truly connected is not just online. It’s spending your time in a way that is present with others, not just FOMO.  If you are crying for your phone, maybe it’s time to set up in an in-person with your friend, or friends together. We have a need to connect. Social media isn’t the only filler to that need.
          Connecting is all about people, relationships and being present.  
 
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Would you ‘Say No to Text?” Say No to Social Media?  Tell me what you think.  
 
Christine Rosen is a writer for The Wall Street Journal. Read her article here.

Basketball Feet: Staying On Your Toes for the Next Move in Social Media

Any good Basketball Player knows you have to do your best to forecast, but you can’t always know where the ball is going. That’s why you stay on you feet, and specifically your toes.

So I told my team to stay on their feet regarding Social Media. Basketball feet. You’re ready, on your toes, watching for that next move.

And so it is with Social Media. Algorithms change. Search results adapt. New criteria come in; others are wiped out. A social media site’s goal is to make search results legitimate, authentic and helpful. So should UniversalGiving’s listings be: true, helpful, inspiring.

No good basketball player drives toward the right hand side of the basket every single time. No great athlete ever takes a three point shot every single play.

Social Media sites won’t stay the same. They move it up, they change it up and make it better — and so should we.

Why You Can’t Take Your Freedom to Think, and Freedom to Speak, for Granted

I love our famous Social Media Guru Beth Kanter.  Below is a great excerpt on how to attain Internet access, from what she and her colleagues learned from all over the world.

May people who need a voice, have one. May people who desire freedom attain it. May people who simply want to express an idea….

be able to do so.

We shouldn’t ever take our freedom to think, and our freedom to speak, for granted.

Read on to get your freedom, or help someone who needs it.   Beth Kanter relates how she faced Internet blockage during a Social Media training center in the Middle East:

“Unfortunately, yesterday, the Pakistan government decided to block Twitter – after we had just gotten everyone comfortable tweeting!

According to Pakistan’s Express Tribune, the request to block the site was made by the Ministry of Information and Technology, because of a drawing competition (details here). The ministry asked Twitter to remove the content, but Twitter responded that it “cannot stop any individual doing anything of this nature on the website.”    Directives to block the site were sent to ISPs in several parts of the country, including PTCL Broadband and Wi-Tribe. It also reports that Twitter is still accessible by mobile using secure browsers like Opera, as well as proxies and VPNs.  More from GlobalVoices.

The coverage in TechCrunch came about when activists in Pakistan wrote to major social media sites about the block.  Waqas Ali, who is Lahore, sent TechCrunch a screenshot of the blocked Twitter.   According to TechCrunch, Ali has also played a role in a past campaign in the country to keep Facebook from getting banned.

The block did not last long.  According to Pakistan’s Express Tribune, the Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani made the decision to restore access to Twitter.   

My colleague, Stephanie Rudat, who is working with me on the project, and I decided that we needed to “How To Get Past Internet Censorship” review.   Stephanie put together this awesome resource list of services.”

*****

Beth, thank you for an inspiring and practical way to help others…and to being responsive!    I bet the entire world thanks you.

Biography – Beth Kanter (from bethkanter.org)

Beth Kanter is the author of Beth’s Blog: How Nonprofits Can Use Social Media, one of the longest running and most popular blogs for nonprofits.  She co-authored the book titled “The Networked Nonprofit” with Allison Fine published by J Wiley in 2010 that received Honorable Mention for the Terry McAdams Award.  Beth has over 30 years working in the nonprofit sector in technology, training, capacity building, evaluation, fundraising, and marketing.   Her second book, Measuring the Networked Nonprofit,  with Co-Author KD Paine, will be published in October, 2012.

In 2009, she was named by Fast Company Magazine as one of the most influential women in technology and one of Business Week’s “Voices of Innovation for Social Media.”  She was named Visiting Scholar for Social Media and Nonprofits for the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in 2009-2012.  She was a Society of New Communications Research Fellow for 2010.

Beth was honored with the inaugural PepsiCo Women’s Inspiration Award at the 2011SxSW Interactive Festival.

The Future for Social Media

Predicting the next big trend in social media is a widespread goal.  I recently read an article  by David Armano which offered some good insights.  “Six Social Media Trends for 2010” looks at where we are, and suggests where we might be going.  David also asked for our own predictions.  Here are the three I can see:

1- Global Phone Pals. We’ll see increased world peace and  understanding due to more people communicating so easily through global phone networks, begin ‘phone pals’ rather then penpals. We’ll see this most with the generation starting at age 10. They don’t know anything else but a global world.

2- Focus on Quality. People will fatigue of keeping up numerous sites. They’ll begin to pick a few which provide excellence in information and stick with those sites which can consistently deliver the following:

– Quality Information
– Quality Interaction (with other, qualified people providing value/excellence in their social media experience)

3- Specific Successes and Failures.  We’ll see some sites crash and burn, but not always across the board. We’re already seeing some social media sites fail in one country and thrive in others (ie Friendster: failed in U.S., but succeeding in Asia, primarily the Phillipines.)

What trends do you see in social media for the future?