Tag Archives: simplicity

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural” – Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

— Dr. Benjamin Spock

 

girl wearing pink camisole on brown plant during daytime

 

It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.  It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

 

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…

 


Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children.  He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history.  Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books.  He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s.  While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing.  He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.

Bio Source: Wikipedia 


Fig¹.Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

 

 

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”

—Lao Tzu

 

green leafed plant on clear glass vase filled with water

 

 

Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure. If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism. It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

 

man standing on stone looking at sunset

 

 

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted. We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

 

 


Legends vary, but scholars place Lao Tzu birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

According to many popular legends, the philosopher got married and also had a son named ‘Zong’, who later became a legendary soldier.

Biosource: Wikipedia, The Famous People


Citations:

Fig¹.Sarah Dorweiler on Unsplash

Fig².Joshua Earle on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Home Should Be

 

 

Home is so many things, to so may people. What should a Home be?

 

A Home Should Be Inspiring. 

 

All the objects in your home should reinforce your values and character.  Home should be a respite of calm and peace, and a reflection of who you are.

 

 

white house under maple trees

 

 

A Home Should Demonstrate Moderation. 

 

 

white wooden kitchen island and cupboard cabinets near glass panel door

 

 

A Home Should Have People Who are Loving and Kind.

 

 

A home should have balance. 

 

 

white kitchen table

 

 

The best homes reflect a sense of balance within the spaces, allowing for different types of activities.  Some may be more energetic, others which are more peaceful.

 

 

A Home Should Reflect You, What Is Right For You.

 

 

white and red concrete house

 

 

Finally,

A Home Should Be Something You Carry Everywhere.

 

 

3 women sitting on bench near the flowers

 

 

I Am Grateful for My Home and Your Home Today,

Pamela

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Scott Webb on Unsplash

Fig². Jason Briscoe on Unsplash

Fig³. Le Creuset on Unsplash

Fig⁴. Hugo Sousa on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

 

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”

—Lao Tzu

 

photo-1523441263-830cac2fe90b

 

 

Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure. If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism. It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

 

photo-1526779259212-939e64788e3c.jpeg

 

 

Simplicity allows us to not be distracted. We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

 

 


 

 

Legends vary, but scholars place Lao Tzu birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

The Classic Pamela Positive: Money Increases Happiness

 

Money increases happiness, according to Harvard University

But only when it is lifting people out of extreme poverty.  

 

 

MONIEZ.jpeg

 

 

It essentially comes down to Maslow’s basic needs.  

If money can help you attain shelter, food and clothing — which eventually lifts you into the middle class –  then it does bring you happiness.

But little after that.

Once those basic needs are taken care of, we must go to higher needs for happiness.  Caring for people. Caring for ourselves. Doing the right thing. Living a simpler life.

According to Stephen G. Post, Director of Compassionate Care at Stony Brook University in New York, happiness was on a higher level during the Great Depression than it was at the turn of this century.  He attributes much of this to a simpler lifestyle.

Live simply; be happy.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Home Should Be

 

A home should be inspiring. 

 

All the objects in your home should reinforce your values and character.  Home should be a respite of calm and peace, and a reflection of who you are.

 

A home should demonstrate moderation. 

 

 

brina-blum-612693-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Homes should reflect what is needed.  Meet your needs, and then embrace moderation and simplicity.

 

A home should have balance. 

 

The best homes reflect a sense of balance within the spaces, allowing for different types of activities.  Some may be more energetic, others which are more peaceful.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Better To Make a Few Mistakes Being Natural

 

“Better to make a few mistakes being natural than to do everything out of a feeling of worry.”

 

The Common Sense Book of Baby and Child Care, Dr. Benjamin Spock, 1946

 

 

toddler-439112_640

 

It’s better to make a few mistakes being natural.   It’s important to be who we are in a natural, real way.  If we get everything right, and are absolutely perfect, but it’s done with anxiety…. then it actually isn’t right, is it?

 

What we do needs to be done with care, love, calm.  With joy and sincerity…and since Dr. Benjamin Spock was a famous leader in parenting in the 40s, I’ll take his advice not only for parenting, but also for management.  And for our communications, how we live our lives, how we treat others…

 

******

 

Dr. Spock was an influential writer on childrearing, who advocated for increased flexibility and affection in the treatment of infants and children. He was a pediatrician and his book entitled Baby and Childcare is one of the best selling books in history. Aside from that work, he also published 12 other books. He was an activist, involved in the anti-war movements in the 1960s and 1970s. While at Yale University, he became an Olympic gold medalist in rowing. He married Jane Cheney and they had two children together.