Tag Archives: selflessness

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

 

In this article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

 

 

 

As Cindy Crawford says,

 

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

 

 

 

 

So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

 

 


 

 

Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She was frequently featured on a number of magazines including Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Allure. She has walked on the runway for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Christian Dior. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns, and appeared in TV, music videos, and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings. 

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center. She is married to fellow model, Rande Gerber and they have two children together. 

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: Sticking with the Beauty of Loving Yourself and Others

In this article by fellow Fast Company blogger, Alicia Morga, advised: “Adopt the Cindy Crawford motto: no flaws…stick with the beauty of loving yourself and others.”

As Cindy Crawford says,

“Never point out your flaws, but do admit to your mistakes.”

 

What a powerful distinction.  Cindy is an accomplished wife, mother, businesswoman, spokesperson and model.  She’s demonstrated beauty in so many ways, specifically through her acumen, well-spoken manner, desire to make a beautiful life and home accessible to everyone, and most importantly, knowing that true, lasting beauty starts and comes from within.

Beauty is about trusting yourself, appreciating your unique qualities, just as we should for other people. It’s one of our greatest age old wisdoms, to love your neighbor as yourself.  And to love our neighbor as ourselves, we have to start with, yes, you and me.

 

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So, as Cindy advises, don’t point out areas of yourself that are weak. You might be working on those, and we all have areas of improvement. Do demonstrate your positive qualities of intellect, kindness, graciousness, honesty, selflessness. We recognize and celebrate these abundantly.

There will be a time, many times, when we all need to own up to mistakes or ways we can be better. Then we, with rapid fire, should admit our mistakes and, where necessary, apologize. Part of our beauty is cultivating caring, honest, open relationships where we admit where we could have been better. With this admittance comes strength and a more beautifully enduring relationship with others – and ourselves.

Truth is beauty. We start with the Truth of what is good about us and others. We stay with that until we find a time where we need to admit where we fell down. And we avoid simply putting others, or ourselves, down at all.

Stick with the Beauty of loving yourself and others.

***

Cindy Crawford was a popular supermodel of the ’80s and ’90s. She was frequently featured on a number of magazines including Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan, and Allure. She has walked on the runway for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Christian Dior. She has also been involved in fitness campaigns, and appeared in TV, music videos, and movies.  Since retiring from modeling in 2000, she has been working on creating beauty products and home furnishings. 

When Crawford was ten, her three-year-old brother Jeff died of leukemia. Since then, a focal point of her charity work has been childhood leukemia research. She is an official supporter of the Ronald McDonald House Charities and an honorary committee member of the California Wildlife Center. She is married to fellow model, Rande Gerber and they have two children together. 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “I don’t think you ever stop giving.” —Oprah Winfrey

 

  “I don’t think you ever stop giving. I really don’t. I think it’s an on-going process. And it’s not just about being able to write a check. It’s being able to touch somebody’s life.” —Oprah Winfrey

 

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That’s what we are all here to do: Touch someone’s life today.  

Stop what you are doing, look up, and care about someone today. That might be the window washer, the barista at Peet’s, your mom, or the building manager.

 
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Everyone needs care, love, and attention. Touch someone’s life, right now.

How will you do it?

Touch a Life,

Pamela​

 

*******************************************************************************

 

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Oprah Gail Winfrey was born on an isolated farm in Kosciusko, Mississippi, on January 29, 1954. Winfrey’s unmarried parents separated soon after she was born and left her in the care of her maternal grandmother on the farm. The poor, urban lifestyle had its negative effect on Winfrey as a young teenager. Winfrey said her father saved her life. He was very strict and provided her with guidance, structure, rules, and books. Winfrey became an excellent student.

Winfrey became Miss Black Nashville and Miss Tennessee. The Nashville Columbia Broadcasting System affiliate offered her a job; Winfrey turned it down twice, but finally took the advice of a speech teacher, who reminded her that job offers from CBS were “the reason people go to college.” Winfrey was Nashville’s first African American female co-anchor of the evening news. Her emotional ad-lib delivery eventually got her transferred to the daytime talk show arena, and after boosting a third-rated local Chicago talk show to first place, she launched her own production company and became internationally syndicated. By the mid-1990’s, she had reinvented her show with a focus on literature, self-improvement, and spirituality. Though criticized for unleashing a confession culture, promoting controversial self-help ideas, and an emotion-centered approach, she is often praised for overcoming adversity to become a benefactor to others.

Winfrey’s The Oprah Winfrey Show was hugely successful. It was broadcasted in 145 countries and had an average of 233,000 viewers in 2016. When her show first began, her audience was 55 percent larger than that of her closest competitors. Since its creation in 2000, O, The Oprah Magazine has become one of the most successful titles of the periodical press, its print run copies exceeding 2 million.

 

Photo credit: Pamela Littky for VARIETY

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.” —Lao Tzu

“Manifest plainness, embrace simplicity. Reduce selfishness, have few desires.”
—Lao Tzu

 

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Lao Tzus counsel helps us to keep life pure.  If we are running from one activity to the next, we are missing serenity in our daily lives. If we are accumulating things, our lives are crowded by materialism.  It can prevent us from being clear and free to receive new ideas.

 

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Simplicity allows us to not be distracted.  We focus on living a life well lived. We focus on spiritual qualities such as kindness and consideration, which allow our lives to serve others, and ourselves, with the highest good in mind.

***

The specific birthdate of Lao Tzu is unknown. Legends vary, but scholars place his birth between 600 and 300 B.C.E. Lao Tzu is attributed with the writing of the Tao-Te Ching,(taomeaning the way of all life, temeaning the fit use of life by men, and chingmeaning text or classic). Lao Tzu was not his real name, but an honorific given the sage, meaning Old Master.”  Lao Tzus wise counsel attracted followers, but he refused to set his ideas down in writing. He believed that written words might solidify into formal dogma. Lao Tzu wanted his philosophy to remain a natural way to live life with goodness, serenity and respect. Lao Tzu laid down no rigid code of behavior. He believed a persons conduct should be governed by instinct and conscience.

The Good Trade: How to Give Back When You’re Short on Cash Part II

In Part I of this series, we talked about attitude changes making meaningful phone calls are ways that simultaneously save money and give back to your community. In Part II,  we finish this series with other ideas that make you feel good without spending!

Missed Part I? Click here! 

♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~♦~

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3. THANK YOU NOTES

While some people enjoy receiving gifts, all of us appreciate a kind word. It is one thing to say it, but it can be even more meaningful to put a note in writing. What if you made a commitment to write a thank you note to someone every week? Since the invention of stamps in 1840, this has been possible. Hallmark really innovated by coming up with the concept of greeting cards. In the early 1900s an aspiring entrepreneur, Joyce Clyde Hall, left Nebraska to sell his cards in Kansas City.  He simply had positive quotes, and put them in the cards. Soon we had cards for birthdays, anniversaries, graduations and the like.

Now you can congratulate friends on a new job, express condolences for the passing of a loved one, or simply say you are thinking of them. You can think of any positive reason you like. Handwritten letters are memorable, and heartfelt.

4. INVITE SOMEONE OVER FOR DINNER

You never know what someone might be going through – a painful divorce, struggling through college, or just having a bad day. Opening up your home will make someone feel appreciated. In addition, it costs less than going out. The leftovers from this dinner can be packaged up for the homeless. That’s double giving!

5. SET ASIDE MONEY FROM A DAILY RITUAL TO DONATE

Giving doesn’t have to mean a life full of sacrifices. We can still buy an In-N-Out burger or get our nails done. But instead of buying several Starbuck’s coffees every week, you can drink one less.  Donate the money you saved: Even $5 can make a difference in someone’s life. In the U.S. it can buy a small lunch, but abroad it can be used to build a library or to buy mosquito nets to prevent malaria. In these cases, your money is scaling to help many people — your dollar goes even further. 
Difficult financial times does not mean your giving must shut down. Instead, it allows us to examine how our time and money are spent. Do you have time to write that kind note? Have a free moment to make a delicious home cooked meal? There are so many ways to give back that won’t hurt your wallet and will enrich your life.  It takes a different view of wealth. This kind of wealth consists of kindness, patience, and selflessness.   

There’s not a moment to wait – let’s get started giving of our abundance!

 

Click here for the full article on The Good Trade’s website!

POP! Your Inspiration for the Day. You Can’t Miss with This!

“Fill your life with love.  Scatter sunshine.  Forget self, think of others.”

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What a lovely admonition from Normal Vincent Peale, a thought leader in the 50s who counseled presidents, church leaders, and thousands of people needing help and advice.

People came to him with deep sadness, hurt and pain, mostly emotional.   Yet he helped “turn them around.”  He’d lift them up. Give them practical steps to change their lives.   Make it doable and inspiring.


Norman Vincent Peale was the pastor of Marble Collegiate Church in New York City from 1922 to 1974. He founded Guidposts in 1945. He published his best selling The Power of Positive Thinking in 1952. His other books include The Art of Living, A Guide to Confident Living (also a radio show), The Tough-Minded Optimist and Inspiring Messages for Daily Living. 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Vincent_Peale

 

Purpose in Life — I am Here to Establish Connections of Love

“I am here to establish connections of love. To celebrate all affection; to raise others up in a spiritual, boundless way.”

This was a sweet journal entry at a very young age.  It aspires to just give selflessly, overflowing with goodness.  I look back on it fondly, to think how I can:

Create a connection based on love, no matter who I meet today

Celebrate any way I see affection, kindness, compassion

Lift others up spiritually, encouraging them.

Please join me today living a life of love!