Tag Archives: relaxation

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Home Should Be

 

 

Home is so many things, to so may people. What should a Home be?

 

A Home Should Be Inspiring. 

 

All the objects in your home should reinforce your values and character.  Home should be a respite of calm and peace, and a reflection of who you are.

 

 

white house under maple trees

 

 

A Home Should Demonstrate Moderation. 

 

 

white wooden kitchen island and cupboard cabinets near glass panel door

 

 

A Home Should Have People Who are Loving and Kind.

 

 

A home should have balance. 

 

 

white kitchen table

 

 

The best homes reflect a sense of balance within the spaces, allowing for different types of activities.  Some may be more energetic, others which are more peaceful.

 

 

A Home Should Reflect You, What Is Right For You.

 

 

white and red concrete house

 

 

Finally,

A Home Should Be Something You Carry Everywhere.

 

 

3 women sitting on bench near the flowers

 

 

I Am Grateful for My Home and Your Home Today,

Pamela

 


Citations:

Fig¹. Scott Webb on Unsplash

Fig². Jason Briscoe on Unsplash

Fig³. Le Creuset on Unsplash

Fig⁴. Hugo Sousa on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India ‘Namaste’ means: I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace”

 

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

—Ram Dass

 

 

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

 

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

 

woman sitting on rock near green tree under white clouds and blue sky

 

 

Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

 

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing.  Be amazed.

 

Ram Dass teaches us to honor the divine in everyone, regardless of their background, religion, ethnicity, or thoughts.  He’s practiced this at Harvard, India and all over, striving to bring peace to the world, person by person.

 

 

sailboat on body of water during daytime

 

 

So, who do you see the divine in today? Who amazes you today?

 

For me, it is my Mom.   She is a great person, a great mom, a sincere friend a shining light of care for others.  She is that peacegiver of divine Love, loving others, all the time.

 

 


 

Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.

During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions.  He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path.  His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet.  He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

BioSources: Wikipedia, RamDass.org

 


Citations:
Fig¹. Brooke Cagle on Unsplash
Fig². Kevin Noble on Unsplash

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “God Is Awake” – Victor Hugo

 

“When you have laboriously accomplished your daily tasks, go to sleep in peace. God is awake.”

– Victor Hugo

 

Mr. Hugo points to our American culture for sure: We work and work and work. We are a productive country, a do-er people. Even though lately we have so many inefficiencies in government and programs, as individuals, we ‘do.’

And so we must pause. We must reflect. We realize when we lay our heads gently down for rest, that God is watching.

 

 

eduardo-flores-759365-unsplash.jpg

 

 

She is caring and loving. He is standing guard. This loving Principle may even be shaping our thoughts so that we awake refreshed. We can start the day with greater clarity and positive purpose than the day before.

Work…Rest…Trust God…

 

 

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And so we live Life fully.

 

 


 

Victor Hugo (1802 – 1885) was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist. He is considered as one of the most well-known French Romantic writers. In France, Hugo’s literary fame comes first from his poetry. Among many volumes, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 (known in English as The Hunchback of Notre-Dame).  Les Miserables focused on social issues of the time, and helped bring these to wider attention. Hugo was married to a childhood friend, Adele Foucher, and they had five children.

Source photo: everystockphoto.com

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm” – John Greenleaf Whittier

   

 “Oh Still, Small Voice of Calm”

 

 

 

sea-dawn-sunset-cloudy

 

Breathe through the pulses of our desire

Thy coolness and Thy balm;

Let sense be dumb, let flesh retire;

Speak through the earthquake, wind, and fire,

O still, small voice of calm!

 

– John Greenleaf Whittier

 

 

Dear Living and Giving readers… this is all we need today. Just a
bit of calm.  See where you can be and feel calm today.

Believing in Peace for You and for Us All,

Pamela

 


John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 – 1892) was an influential American Quaker poet and abolitionist. Highly regarded in his lifetime and after, he is remembered for his patriotic poems and a number of poems turned into hymns. Whittier grew up on a poor farm with a large extended family and little formal education. However, he was heavily influenced by Quaker ideologies of humanitarianism, compassion, and social responsibility, introduced to him by his father. He remained an outspoken proponent of abolitionism as a founding member of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Many of his early poems dealt with the cause of slavery.  After the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, Whittier turned to other forms of poetry; his most famous include Snow-Bound and Dear Lord and Father of Mankind.  Starting around 1850, he also wrote folksy New England ballads and narrative poems, sentimental country idylls, and simple religious poems that appealed strongly to his readers.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.” —Will Rogers

 

“Do the best you can, and don’t take life too serious.”

-Will Rogers

 

 

 

viva la vie.jpeg

 

 

This is great advice — and a tough one. Strive for excellence — then let go.  Excel, but relax. Be a go-getter, but laugh. One can think it is confusing!

Yet even the greatest Olympic ice skater, the president of the U.N., and your awesome mom need “a break from excellence.” Just a little time to breathe, reflect, enjoy life, live.

 

 

picnic.jpeg

 

 

Why? Because then they can go back to excellence. They’ve rejuvenated, recharged, and “re-become” themselves. Did you know that 53% of people in the U.S. are considered burned out? And 48% percent in San Francisco and 52% percent in New York. What is burnout? It is a state of physical, emotional, and/or emotional exhaustion experienced at work.

 

 

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So let the superstar in your life go for it and let go. They deserve it. And so do you!

 

 

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William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma. Rogers grew up in a ranching family. In 1905, Rogers began performing a lasso act on the vaudeville circuit. His charm and humor, along with his technical ability, made Rogers a star. Audiences responded with enthusiasm to his off-the-cuff remarks delivered while performing elaborate roping tricks. Rogers parlayed his vaudeville success into a Broadway career. He debuted in New York in 1916, performing in The Wall Street Girl. This led to many more theatrical roles, including headlining appearances in the Ziegfeld Follies. In addition to acting, Rogers became nationally known as a writer. He penned a column for the Saturday Evening Post in newspapers. His columns dealt with contemporary issues from a perspective of small town morality, emphasizing the integrity of working people.

Rogers’s fame had eclipsed his country bumpkin persona by 1930. No longer believable as an uneducated outsider, he was able to voice his characteristic wit and wisdom while playing a professional. Legendary director John Ford worked with Rogers on three of these later films—Doctor Bull, Judge Priest and The Steamboat Round the Bend. On August 15, 1935, the plane carrying Will Rogers crashed in Point Barrow, Alaska. He died on impact. Millions across the country mourned the sudden silencing of a quintessentially American voice.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Make A Date With Your Favorite Book Tonight.” – Love, Dove

 

In Silicon Valley, we are go-go-go getters. We “go -get” after our businesses, our startup company, our new deal, our new everything. We are “on it!”

 

And yet… while that productivity is good, leadership and kind care taking of oneself takes time.

I’ll share. A couple years ago, I had a Duke Event (which I love) and a Stanford International Happy Hour, (which I also love). And yet, I needed to be quiet…

 

But my mind said…  

 

You should go!! You could meet more people that will help UniversalGiving! You should take this opportunity. If you don’t you will feel badly.

 

 

dovedove

 

And part of me, did.

 

I wrestled.

 

I finally made the decision:

 

To go home. 

 

And I read. And it was so peaceful, and life giving and regenerating, and kind. And I was filled. And I was ready the next day…

 

 

do-you-love-me_personalityhacker

 

 

If you’ve been going hard, why not let yourself go home tonight. You don’t need to network, make the next deal, meet a new person. If you are supposed to meet them, they will come back into your life in another way, if that is the right opportunity for the both of you.

 

Enjoy a Peaceful Night. I’m going to church… and then, I’m going to read. 🙂

Sincerely,
Pamela

 


 

Dove Chocolate, sold as Galaxy in other countries, is a Mars Company owned and operated brand of chocolate that is virtually in all supermarkets and convenience stores across the US. They are well known for their silky and smooth texture and are well liked. However, what makes each chocolate special is the addition of a quote inside each of their wrappers, which has attracted both praise and critique from many consumers.
Dove Chocolate messages like “Believe in yourself,” and “Make the most of everyday,” and others dealing with hope, mindfulness, and inspiration, bring positivity to the life of the reader. However, some people feel that sayings like “Too much of a good thing is still wonderful,” and “Do what feels right,” are misleading and may be giving people bad advice, and have been poking fun at the wrapper messages. You can take a look at photos of their wrappers by clicking here and you can read a compilation of their messages here.

The Classic Pamela Positive: “In India, when we meet and greet and we say ‘Namaste’, which means: I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace”

“In India, when we meet and greet and we say Namaste, which means: I honor the place in you where the entire universe resides, I honor the place in you of love, of light, of truth, of peace. I honor the place within you where if you are in that place in you and I am in that place in me, there is only one of us.”

 

-Ram Dass

Come down from your energy high, your doerism, your list. Your take-care-of -the-top-priorities-at-work, and get-done-with-all-your email focus. Dont go to the drycleaners or grocery store. Stop cleaning your home, pushing yourself on your career, helping your kids (for a moment), trying to have kids, networking, volunteering, or getting a match.com date.

 

Stop worrying. Stop thinking about the future.

 

 

brooke-cagle-320838-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Stop your TV show. Your podcast. Your Spotify.

 

Just honor that other person in front of you, in a space of servitude, awe and love. The people in our lives are amazing.  Be amazed.

 

 

dave-contreras-119713-unsplash.jpg

 

 

Who amazes you today?

 

For me, it is my Mom, and my sister. Both great people, great moms, and shining lights of caring for others.

 


 

 

  • Ram Dass (born Richard Alpert; April 6, 1931) is an American contemporary spiritual teacher and the author of the seminal 1971 book Be Here Now. He is known for his personal and professional associations with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s, for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba, and for founding the charitable organizations Seva Foundation and Hanuman Foundation.
  • During his psychedelic research, Ram Dass traveled to India in 1967 and met his guru, Neem Karoli Baba, affectionately known as Maharajji, who gave Ram Dass his name, which means “servant of God.”  Since 1968, Ram Dass has pursued a panoramic array of spiritual methods and practices from potent ancient wisdom traditions.  He has also practiced karma yoga or spiritual service, which opened up many other souls to their deep yet individuated spiritual practice and path.  His unique skill in getting people to cut through and feel divine love without dogma is still a positive influence on many people from all over the planet.  He now resides on Maui, where he shares his teachings through the internet and through retreats on Maui. His work continues to be a path of inspiration to his old students and friends as well as young people and newcomers.

 

Sources: Wikipedia: Ram Dass and Bio from RamDass.org