Tag Archives: reflection

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

 

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I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

 

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We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving™. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me–and for my organization.

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Be Clear About What Is Truly Essential”

 

Marine corps officer Robert J. Wicks shares with us some important lessons on life and nature.

Rather than read, he encourages us to reflect.  If we face a challenge, we can act not from anger but from joy and grounded peace.

 

 

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From his book, Streams of Contentment, here are three tips on living a natural, and successful life.

* Be clear about what is truly essential.

* Appreciate everything and everyone in your life right now.

* Recognize that a little silence and solitude is no small thing.

– Robert J. Wicks

When we appreciate what is important, right now, we honor life and everyone around us.

 

 


 

 

 

Robert J. Wicks is a clinical psychologist and author, interested in how spirituality and psychology are intertwined. He graduated from Fairfield University in Connecticut in 1968, with a B.A. in psychology and philosophy. He later went on to receive his PhD in psychology from Hahnemann Medical College and Hospital, now known as Drexel University Medical College. Wicks has taught at a number of universities, given commencement speeches, and presented to Congress. In the 1990s, he worked with relief workers, who were working in Rwanda during the civil war. He has also worked with professionals who support Iraqi and Afghan war veterans in the early 2000s. Throughout his career, he has published over 40 books inspired by his studies into psychology and spirituality. Wicks has received a number of awards including the The Humanitarian Award Association for Spiritual, Ethical, Religious and Value Issues in Counseling American Counseling Association. He has been married to his wife, Michaele Barry Wicks, for over 40 years and they have one daughter together.

 

 

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it. When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it….  After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

– Warren Bennis

 

 

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Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his PhD from MIT in 1955. His focus was in Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business.

 

 

 

“Many of Us Crucify Ourselves Between Two Thieves – Regret For the Past and Fear Of the Future.” – Fulton Oursler

 

“Many of us crucify ourselves between two thieves – regret for the past and fear of the future.”

– Fulton Oursler

 

 

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What can you let go of today?

 

 


 

 

Charles Fulton Oursler (January 22, 1893 – May 24, 1952) was an American journalist, playwright, editor, and author of mysteries and detective fiction. He was raised in a devout Baptist family. His childhood passions of reading and stage magic led to crafting stories that combined magic and magicians. Notable works include “The Magician Detective,” Father Flanagan of Boy’s Town (later adapted into the 1938 movie Boys Town), and The Greatest Story Ever Told (adapted as the 1965 movie of the same name). Although he was raised in a devout Baptist family, Charlies declared himself an agnostic at age 15. He, his second wife Grace Perkins, and their family would eventually convert to Catholicism following a trip to the Holy Land. (Bio source: Wikipedia: Fulton Oursler, Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings)

The Classic Pamela Positive: “And the Day Came When the Risk to Remain Tight In a Bud Was More Painful Than the Risk It Took to Blossom.” – Anais Nin

 

“And the Day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

-Anais Nin

 

There is certainly a time to “stay in your bud,” to hibernate. There are times when it is important to be quiet, reflective. In this space, one can hear the truth, and we can ask questions which gear us towards wise actions:

 

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What shall I do for the next step to help further my business today?

What shall I do to help enhance my relationship with my husband?

What shall I do to help bring peace into a colleague’s day?

Perhaps…. it is slowing down.  It is identifying the top two companies we should speak with who would be good partners — rather than the top 10. Or sending positive stats on your husband’s favorite sports teams. Or buying a chocolate chip cookie for your colleague and leaving it on her desk with a kind note and a smile.  Anything we are impelled to do with love as our direction, is the right thing to do.

So if we listen…

and follow the footsteps of Truth in serving others…

That wisdom leads us to larger views….

and larger questions.

Perhaps there is a bigger step in our future… and it is a time to really blossom. Our bud must come forth.

 

 

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So we keep listening… at some point, wisdom will make it so clear that we must take action in a revolutionary way. Perhaps it is something we had thought of, or perhaps a surprise. It could be a career change. It could be setting up an annual get-away with your husband or changing where you and your husband live.  It could be that we manage more coworkers, or move into another business unit.

But we will be listening.  We will be poised. We will be ready to blossom!

 


 

Anaïs Nin (born Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell, February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an American author born to Spanish-Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised. She spent some time in Spain and Cuba but lived most of her life in the United States where she became an established author. She published journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), novels, critical studies, essays, and short stories. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds, was published posthumously. Nin was first married to Hugh Parker Guiler, and later to actor Rupert Pole.

Bio source: Wikipedia: Anais Nin

Quote source: Quotes on Fear and Other Profound Sayings

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution to Any Relationship Problem: What Abraham Lincoln Did

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

 

— Abraham Lincoln

 

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

 

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

 

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

 

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Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves  being right.

 

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end.  Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

 

It wins no battles.  Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

 

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We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led.  Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful.   It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family.  It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 

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Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He was instrumental in ending slavery and is admired for his commitment to national unity, equal rights, liberty, and democracy in America. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric. He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. The Civil War and the deaths of two of his children led him near the end of his life to more frequently speak of dependence on God.

Quote Source: Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address, quoted by Bob Buford in his newsletter article, “Prayers of Three Great Men in Unsettled Times.”

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Personal Happiness Lives in the Realization That……” – J.K. Rowling

“Personal happiness lives in the realization that life is not a checklist of personal acquisition or achievement; your qualifications, your CV, are not your life, though you will meet many people of my age and older that confuse the two.”

– J.K. Rowling

 

What an important statement to read over, again and again and again. Team Living and Giving, you really need to know who you are.

 
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You are vibrant, strong, positive. Or perhaps you are kind, soft and caring.  You are smart from school, street smart, or heart smart – in some way you are smart!  You help your neighbor, run an errand for your mom, bake cookies for your kids, or pull up another seat at the dinner table for an unexpected guest.  That’s being the best you.

We take J.K. Rowling’s beautiful reminder to be all who we are.  To focus on our qualities, not just on our resume. That’s how we can be happy, and give the best happiness, to others.

 

Enjoy Your Life,

Pamela

 

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J.K. Rowling is a British author, most well-known for her fantasy series Harry Potter. She grew up in a village, Winterbourne, with her younger sister and parents. Her childhood was turbulent and she turned to writing fantasy stories to share with her sister as an escape. She attended the University of Exeter, where she received her B.A. in French and Classics. She was into pop music while growing up and she also studied abroad in France for a year while in college. In 1990, she began writing the Harry Potter series, but she soon moved to Portugal to teach English. In Portugal, she met her former husband and she had one child with him. After the divorce, she moved with her young child, Jessica, to Edinburgh, Scotland to be near her sister. Throughout her difficult times, she turned to writing the novel to positively channel her energy. She finished the first book of the series in 1995 and in 1997, the book was published. From there, Rowling would receive awards and grants that allowed her to continue writing the novels. The last four books of the series broke records as the fastest-selling books in history and the brand is estimated to be valued at $15 billion dollars. In 2001, she remarried to Neil Murray and the two have a son together. She started her own charity in 2000, called Volant Charitable Trust that aims to eradicate poverty and social inequality. She is also the president of the charity Gingerbread. She gives to a number of causes including research in multiple sclerosis.