Tag Archives: reflection

The Classic Pamela Positive: A Solution To Any Relationship Problem

 

“You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors… Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”

― Abraham Lincoln

 

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No matter how we feel we have been wronged, let’s follow Lincoln’s wise advice.

At a minimum, we can pause before we take action.

We slow down to determine the right pathway.

 

woman walking along pathway during daytime

 

Even if we take a stance for what is right, we must come not from a space of ourselves being right.

Taking action simply because we are right does not serve the end. Taking action because we feel wronged most certainly doesn’t.

It wins no battles. Your opponent, who is indeed your friend, will not feel heard, respected, even loved.

 

Man And Woman Wearing Brown Leather Jackets

 

We must step back and come from a space of calm and centeredness, expecting the best for both parties. Then, listening as to what that next step should be, we will be led. Your response, then, is not a reaction; it is thoughtful. It is not ever in retaliation, for no law endorses it. It is of pure motive, as Abraham Lincoln speaks to “the better angels of our nature.”

 

Two Women Sitting on Ground Near Bonfire

 

It does not matter if you are in politics, business, a personal relationship, in a family. It all applies. It’s a law of nature that allows us to keep that “Union” that Abraham Lincoln fought so dearly for, for our country. Thus by his example and success, we too can take a stand to preserve the union of any relationship in our lives.

 


Abraham Lincoln served as the 16th President of the United States, during the Civil War.  He is regarded as one of America’s greatest heroes due to his role as savior of the Union and emancipator of slaves. His rise from humble beginnings to achieving the highest office in the land is a remarkable story. His eloquent support of democracy and insistence that the Union was worth saving embody the ideals of self-government that all nations strive to achieve. Lincoln’s distinctively humane personality and incredible impact on the nation have endowed him with an enduring legacy. He is also known for his humble background, self-education, and skill with writing and rhetoric.  He was not a member of any one organized religion, but he frequently used Biblical imagery and references in his writing and speaking, and referenced a Providence who had a higher purpose. Lincoln married Mary Todd on November 4, 1842, at her sister Elizabeth’s home in Springfield, Illinois. She was 23 years old and he was 33 years of age. They had four sons, all born in Springfield.

Bio Source: Wikipedia, BIOGRAPHY  Fig¹.  Photo by Library of Congress on Unsplash  Fig². Photo by Alexander Ramsey on Unsplash  Fig³. Photo by Vera Arsic on Pexels  Fig⁴. Photo by VisionPic .net on Pexels

 

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking Of The Things In My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is A Peaceful And Positive Way To Start The Day.” – Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it.

When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…

After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

- Warren Bennis

 

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I was honored to work in Leadership under Warren Bennis, a wonderful Business Leader. Ever calm and so very experienced, he taught us to look at life from an evaluative outlook.

What can I learn from this today?

How can I become better?

How will my life be better once I implement what I have learned?

 

Photo of Man Holding a Book

 

Take each step of life with great step of gratitude, goodness, and desire to grow. And upwards you go! With grace and peace. Thank you, dear Warren Bennis.

 


Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1955. His focus was on Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business. He has been married twice and has 4 children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig².  Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

photo-1517960413843-0aee8e2b3285

 

I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

woman kissing baby wearing gray onesie

 

We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving®. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me-and for my organization.

Keeping Balanced for Me, for You and Our Way of Giving Back to the World,

Pamela


Fig¹.  Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash  Fig².  Photo by Vincent Delegge on Unsplash

The Classic Pamela Positive: “Thinking of the Things in My Life That Bring Me Pleasure Is a Peaceful and Positive Way to Start the Day.” -Warren Bennis

 

“Thinking of the things in my life that bring me pleasure is a peaceful and positive way to start the day — and a much better way to deal with a perceived failure than to ruminate on it. 

When you’re down, think of the things you have to look forward to. When you are no longer in the grip of the mishap, then you are ready to reflect on it…. 

After reflection, the learning of the past is known, and the solution of the experience — the course of action we must take as a result — becomes clear. ”

- Warren Bennis

 

Close-up Photo of Man Wearing Black Suit Jacket Doing Thumbs Up Gesture

 

I was honored to work in Leadership under Warren Bennis, a wonderful Business Leader. Ever calm and so very experienced, he taught us to look at life from an evaluative outlook.

What can I learn from this today?

How can I become better?

How will my life be better once I implement what I have learned?

 

Photo of Man Holding a Book

 

Take each step of life with great step of gratitude, goodness, and desire to grow. And upwards you go! With grace and peace. Thank you, dear Warren Bennis.

 


Warren Bennis was a pioneer in Leadership studies, writing numerous influential books on the subject, including Leaders and Leading For a Lifetime. He was raised in New Jersey and he enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943. During his time in the U.S. Army, he received the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. After his time in the military, he went on to attend Antioch College, receiving his B.A. in 1951. He continued his education at the London School of Economics before receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1955. His focus was on Economics. He was a business professor at the University of Southern California. In 2007, BusinessWeek named him one of the top ten thought leaders in business. He has been married twice and has 4 children.

Bio Source: Wikipedia  Fig¹.  Photo by Lucas on Pexels  Fig².  Photo by bruce mars on Pexels

The Classic Pamela Positive: Keep Your Balance

 

I think one key point in life is to maintain balance — balance between time for work, time for loved ones, time for oneself, time for interests outside of one’s business. It’s so important to keep that balance, or we’ll simply burn-out.

 

photo-1517960413843-0aee8e2b3285

 

I remember once when I was young in my career, and meeting with a fairly older, single woman. She was a successful venture capitalist. But I don’t know that I would consider her life successful. She traveled the world incessantly and was on every important board. But she seemed tired and joy was scarce. She told me to “Pack it all in.”

I didn’t. I kept my balance. I started a nonprofit and I did creative improv. I took care of my very young nephews and nieces. I loved life and I loved the people in my life.

 

woman kissing baby wearing gray onesie

 

We need to be renewed. We need to feel honored as whole, functioning people with families, outside interests, balanced lives, as well as our commitment to achieving the goals and vision of the organizations we run. The beauty of this balance is that I come back energized to UniversalGiving®. My mind has had “time off” and is thrilled to re-engage with our efforts to serve. I look at challenges in a new light. My energy is renewed. I bring new skills to the table; my thoughts are stronger and more helpful. It’s better for me-and for my organization.

Keeping Balanced for Me, for You and Our Way of Giving Back to the World,

Pamela

 


Fig¹.  Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

Fig².  Photo by Vincent Delegge on Unsplash